Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Today
  2. Tomchri

    Map Day

    Another tiny question,, what clearances do you guys use on the cam sensor? Different behavior? Cheers tom
  3. Tomchri

    Map Day

    I definitely need all the help I can get happy to come back with something. Greenie is running,,,, But very wet outside,,, and it's Friday. Cheers tom
  4. Lockdown is finally easing here. Went a 400 mile run on Monday to the west coast, roads were very quiet, no caravans, Motorhomes etc to impede progress. Loved it, just what I needed. Pubs, hotels, campsites open next week. See what the “new normal” is then.
  5. vtwins4life

    Another V11

    I saw an MT01 at Alice's up on the Skyline outside of Palo Alto a decade ago and never forgot it. Been trying to find one in the States is near impossible and importing one from Canada is out of the question since the model was never certified here. Maybe I'll get lucky one of these days and score one.... VT4L
  6. Thanks DOCC. Apparently its just a plug, so I should be able to fashion a tool for the job.
  7. Lucky Phil

    Map Day

    Ha, ok I was imagining it was used from the other direction,Doh. Thats why the knurling is where it is. Sometimes my dumbness amazes even me. Ciao
  8. That is a common problem with the big blocks. Your differing amount of washers doesn't mean squat. It happened to The Kid the first time he rode his Spot in anger in the Appalachians. You'll notice the gasket gets sucked inward. His was sucked inward in the same place. Use the gaskets with metal core. He's the best mechanic I know, and he knows how to properly install a gasket. We did a field repair with gasket goo that got us through the trip, then he installed the "good" gaskets. 2017-06-04_01-31-41 by Charles Stottlemyer, on Flickr
  9. Tomchri

    Map Day

    0.85mm Cheers Tom Sent fra min SM-A505FN via Tapatalk
  10. Tomchri

    Map Day

    Øhlins tool, with the 10mm hole on the side, if a little help needed. Cheers Tom Sent fra min SM-A505FN via Tapatalk
  11. Tomchri

    Map Day

    It rest on the flat surface on the crankcase. Works good. Cheers Tom Sent fra min SM-A505FN via Tapatalk
  12. You know the other side is screwed up too . Take it apart and do it right . You don't want to ride 45 miles and ruin a new riding boot on this account .
  13. Seth , the leaking o-ring(s) can be accessed after removing the rocker arm assy . Look at a parts diagram and see what you need . When I repaired mine , I just used OEM stuff .
  14. Ha, yes I've had a few interesting discussions with Boeing "We didn't think of that solution so it can't be right" design engineers a few times. Ciao
  15. I have an assortment of the green "high pressure" O-rings for car/truck HVAC use. They appear to be viton - rather higher durometer than the usual nitrile - so would be appropriate for Guzzi crank sensors and that kind of stuff. 390º was their designated limit for that material. Boeing experience you say? I was in tooling in the 70s until I found a steady job in the government Dad spent 38 years there, ending up in Experimental and Test (B-3410 for any Boeing types) in a small building adjacent to the runway. He enjoyed the heck out of it, as the shop was a microcosm of the manufacturing process, with early CNC, heat treat furnace, autoclave, A&P welders etc. He told me stories of the various times he had to demonstrate to certain engineers that two objects cannot occupy the same physical space.
  16. Yep, not bad. I've looked at a dozen or more of these charts over the last few months and whats frustrating is they can vary wildly in their application criterion. I was primarily looking at Petrol compatibility and as this chart shows FKM is very good but I've seen charts that says Nitrile is good with petrol which it isn't in my experience. It's acceptable in fuel for a captured joint with no relative movement where the significant swelling can work to improve the seal but if you want a seal that wont swell in fuel you need FKM. An example. The link you sent indicates Nitrile is "poor" for gasoline but if you go to their complete compatibility guide it's rated as a "1" "satisfactory" ! There are so many seal material compositions that it gets complicated and identifying what a seal is actually made from can be next to impossible if it's not labeled. Viton/FKM all the way for me, you can't go wrong in the majority of applications. We actually had a major issue with Leading Edge slat actuators leaking on 737's a few years ago. They changed the seal material and the new material wasn't as good at low temps. On a flight of around 3-4 hrs of cruize@ 42,000' when the actuators had cold soaked they used to leak everywhere to the extent the passengers could see a trail of skydrol coming off the trailing edge of the wing. Shorter flights were ok and once it landed the seals in the actuators had warmed up again and stopped leaking. Even the designers get it wrong sometimes. Ciao
  17. Here is a nifty chart listing the strengths and weaknesses of the various compositions of O-rings. https://www.globaloring.com/o-ring-materials-comparison-chart/ Located in Texas, they claim to have 50 million O-rings in stock - except for Guzzi sizes. OK, just guessing there...
  18. Over torquing and old obsolete technology is the issue. Ciao
  19. You know docc I wouldn't use those ebay ones or any Buna-N or Nitrile o-rings anymore unless I was desperate. The Viton or FKM are the only way to go I think. Buna and Nitrile have an upper temp limit of 100deg C and even the crankcase oil can easily achieve that under the right conditions. Viton and FKM are around 240 dec C from memory and are fuel proof as well. Some of the Guzzi orings that have been superseded have been done so because they have been changed to Viton. Thats why the Nitrile o-ring leak with age because they are operating up to and over their upper temp limit and they harden. Ciao
  20. Those are perfect for the timing sensor that was leaking on the original poster's (plexiform's) V11 back in 2016, but that may not be what Seth has. The image I posted above shows a leak that had me thinking head gasket for a long time, but it is an O-ring inside the valve cover under a plug (that I can't get out) . . .
  21. #112 O-rings? Here's 5 for $2.50 free shipping https://www.ebay.com/itm/112-O-ring-1-2-ID-x-11-16-OD-x-3-32-thick-Buna-70-Quan-5/293205984259?hash=item4444704403:g:d-EAAOSwlTBdaBQt.
  22. Got tired of being landlocked, so I found a not-rainy day and pulled the left valve cover. Hmmmm. Problem obvious, but what was the cause? Ya' know, you'd think that a well-paid professional mechanic would take some pride in his work. Of the top four bolts, one had a washer that was clearly from some other source, being twice as thick. One other had two washers. Now as to the bolts holding the head guard, two had washers beneath and two did not. How do you suppose that affected the clamping force? And these are the thicker (#6139 0.8mm) gaskets. Went immediately to the surface plate. The guard is flat. Good. After using my favorite beverage (Methylene Chloride) to soften and remove what was left of the old gasket on the cover, I flattened it with a few strokes atop 320 wet or dry on the surface plate. It wasn't bad but a little freshening could not hurt in the flatness arena. A little 3M 8008 gasket maker on the cover, and a sparing amount of Mobil1 synthetic grease on the head side and back together we went. 10 N-m and all was good. Went for a 30 mile/45Km thrash on the freeway/Interstate/Autobahn/Auto Strada and all remained nice and dry. Today, I re-torqued the cover bolts and noted that they would move at 7-8 N-m, so the sandwich I made of them had compressed a bit. Looked at the right side and 3 out of 4 bolts had washers beneath the head guard. Ugh. Since the right side is not leaking, I will let sleeping dogs lie and catch that one at next service. Sure glad I didn't pay for that "maintenance."
  23. Would anyone (please) help me post pics of the tank? I could email them to you.... but can't seem to post directly here. TIA, Joe
  24. Lucky Phil

    Map Day

    I dont understand what surface the depth tool rests on with regards to the crankcase surface. It appears to have a tapered shoulder that rests against the edge of the oring opening, is this correct. If so what flat face do you measure against to get the depth? I would have a flat face on the body of the tool that sat flush against the crankcase face that the sensor plate and shims bolts to then after setting the depth measure from that face to the end of the body and and from the depth projection to the end of the body and subtract the difference to get the reading. Ciao
  25. Tomchri

    Map Day

    Looks even more refined, we didn't bather with the 1/2 square, since it's only handtight,,, made a 10mm hole straight thru thou . Why didn't I show that with a picture Cheers tom
  1. Load more activity
×
×
  • Create New...