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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/12/2019 in all areas

  1. As an tangential anecdote; I play with classic cars, and have a good friend in the restoration business. Primarily he's concerned with Chrysler products of the 60s and 70s. One of his regular customers asked if he'd return to service a pristine MG Midget that had been parked for a decade. He asked if I'd help, because I have some experience with English cars and bikes. After the typical fuel system service and fluid changes, it came to life quite easily, all under the criticism of my friend. "Go-cart" "Tiny motor" "Why would anyone bother?". Needless to say, he drove it around for a fu
    4 points
  2. Honda sells a ton of Groms. Thing is, you can ride them WOT all day, every day - and no one but you knows this. Meanwhile you are ginning like an idiot inside your helmet. A form of the "Big, dirty fun" of which P.J. O'Rourke wrote. .
    2 points
  3. Re; high compression pistons. The historic battle within hemispherical combustion chambers is always between compression and detonation. Firstly, in the U.S., the DOT mandates than anything sold for highway use operate on 87 octane fuel without destroying itself. So, if you're willing to use premium always (who doesn't, anyway?) there is a little room for increases. Here's where things get messy. Firstly, tuning an engine to take advantage in the difference between 87 and 93 octane is something only an expert with a dynomometer, or a very experienced butt and ears, can do meaningfully.
    2 points
  4. After a trip to the White Mtns. last month I decided to lower my V11 LeMans foot pegs for a bit more comfort. My mechanic and I found a way to lower the stock foot pegs using existing mounting holes. It lowers them about an inch. I can gain another inch if I switch to Buell pegs. But for now, these are significantly more comfortable. Attached are before and after pics of both sides. The left side is a simple swap. The right side needs a different bolt. (Still lovin' the bike Tim! It's my go to GT bike.) Mike
    1 point
  5. Yup. Also the oil that came out of it, (And other bikes with these things fitted.) always stinks so heavily of fuel it's hardly oil any more. When 8V's eat their tappets one of the first signs is blackening of the oil. It doesn't stink of fuel though, a bit more 'Burnt' than you would expect but it doesn't smell fuelly though. Heavily contaminated oil also 'Feels' different if you rub it between your fingers. Believe me, I've seen it many times now. It's not just a random sample of one! Pete
    1 point
  6. If the fuelling has been overly rich for a long period then oil dilution would be an issue which wouldn't be doing the already dodgy lifters any favours. I guess this was Petes point? Ciao
    1 point
  7. The injection, good as it is, is not nearly as refined as that on our cars. Cars require no "cold start" lever, have more engine condition sensors, much more powerful computers, coil-on-plug and particularly detonation/knock sensors. Thus, the highest performing cars can run on 87, or even the gasoline substitute called Pemex in Mexico. Not saying they'll be happy. but they'll run. Hemispherical combustion chambers trace back an awful long way - to a time before flame propagation was thought of as influencing the production of power. Aircraft engine designers had to deal with pistons mel
    1 point
  8. Oh , they are righteous , with a few problems . I had one on a 70 Mustang 351c 4spd . I had a 600 cfm double pumper with a chrome dual line I installed on it . I was George Thorogood in that car !
    1 point
  9. For most of us non-competitive, street guys, "hot-rodding" may be an exaggeration. "De-restricting" or "opening up" what is stuffed up probably nets the greatest practical increase for the money. A freer intake and exhaust will net a noticeable difference when one enters the second half of the rev counter. And re-flashing that which may not have been all that well flashed in the first place.
    1 point
  10. Great write up, docc. My V11, out of all the bikes I've owned, is the most sensitive to a tune up. It really is night and day.
    1 point
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