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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/18/2021 in all areas

  1. Becuase Guzzis are made with red wine and Harleys are made with beer. Wine has a higher alcohol content, so it burns more efficiently. The tannins in the red wine also account for Guzzis having more character. My Scura, for example, has hints of blackberry and chocolate.
    6 points
  2. I don't think HD is chasing HP. They are after torque, it seems. And feel. HD has built some pretty powerful engines. Obviously there was the V Rod engine. But they also built a 1200 air cooled engine for the Buell that made 101 HP (mine put out about 80 HP at the rear tire, more than the wife's V11, and over 70 ft/lbs of torque). That was a seriously sweet motor. Not like a V11 motor, it was much more of a stump puller that would still rev while the V11 motor is more of a mid-range motor. Certainly HD could build a more modern engine, but really they seem to be doing fine where they are. And the Live Wire is seriously fast. In the end, there is more than one way to make a nice engine. I just wish HD hadn't killed off Buell.
    4 points
  3. For a production air cooled push rod V twin a Guzzi big block makes good power. The newer 8V CARC engines make better power, but they seem to less fuel efficient. The older 4V engines like from the Daytona and Centuaro have their own issues but they make good power. All three are big block Guzzi's, but each of the three has a different character. Being oversquare is only one aspect of engine design. If you make an engine oversquare but you don't have the flow past the valves to support the oversquare aspect you could make less power, not more. Being oversquare alone does not make more power. Being water cooled alone doesn't make more power. Although you can make more power by adding a turbo or compressor alone..... But then you need to be able to shed the extra heat. I do like how Guzzi's respond well to old school hot rodding. Cleaning up the ports, adding more compression and squish, things like that, can make a noticeable difference in power output of a Guzzi engine. Trying to get more power out of a modern sportbike engine is pretty hard in comparison.
    2 points
  4. Good point about the revs. As much as pushrods and air cooling, isn’t the low revving motor part of the cruiser purpose statement? When I demo rode the new big Indian, I kept hitting the rev limiter (no tach). Finally, I figured out to put it in sixth and “lug” it. It was, then, perfectly at ease.
    2 points
  5. Harleys rev to 5k and Guzzis go to 7k+. Wanna make a 500cc engine make power like 1000cc? Double the revs. Looks at those F1 motors in the '90s that revved to 18k.
    2 points
  6. We did install a power commander on the wife's V11 years ago. That was before options like Guzzi Diag came out. The power commander on the wife's V11 works well. but it is old school tech. The newer Guzzi Diag options has potential that the power commander could never have. That said, it should run fine stock, and if yours doesn't I would do as docc suggests and perform a basic tune up. You never know what state a used bike is in when you acquire it. Once the basics are good there is plenty of time to go down the Guzzi Diag rabbit hole.
    2 points
  7. Welcome, Alfacity ! You are in the right place to “enjoy the ride better!” Here is a great starting point for running issues:
    2 points
  8. I was thinking about that too, Chuck. As far as these springs go, no news is good news. I have not heard of any failures yet either.
    2 points
  9. Well, the poor running continues. And the winner is the relay contacts. After pulling out and reinserting all the relays it’s running well again. Time tomorrow to clean all the contacts and take for a longer shake down ride. Good for my lower back to be back on the stock bars. Thanks again to this forum and it’s members.
    2 points
  10. Volumetric efficiency Thermal efficiency. Mechanical efficiency. Improve any or all of those and you'll get more power.
    1 point
  11. funny, I just did a google today MOPAR (gen 1 & 2, not the new ones) 55 degree valve angle and Guzzi 56 degrees. well said
    1 point
  12. The V11 combustion chamber and piston are very similar to the 1964 Chrysler 426 Hemi. Advantage to the car engine for liquid cooling. Disadvantage for iron which tends to hold hot spots more than aluminum. At Guzzi's claim of 91 BHP, size-for-size, it would make 600 BHP in 7.0 litres, whereas Chrylser's 426 made a 'claimed' 425 gross HP. Some sources claimed that it made more like 550 BHP, but those were claims only.
    1 point
  13. So is the Mistral POS an air temperature sensor spoofer or a lambda sensor spoofer. Both are awful and both have issues. Given the fact the W5AM ecu is an open book using these crappy *solutions* is madness.
    1 point
  14. Hard starting is frequently a cue the valves need adjusted. The fuel injection system on these bikes is pretty good IMHO, but, they need to be set up properly to function well. As mentioned, the "Decent tune-up" thread is an excellent procedure to get the F.I. system calibrated. Also, it's recommended to replace the relays with quality Omron's, a search on here will guide you to the right ones. You just don't know what the P.O.'s did to the thing, such as turning the white knob on left side to adjust idle speed...it's actually the throttle synch adjuster and turning it without a synch tool will mess things up for sure.
    1 point
  15. The Veglia on my EV has the counter weight come loose. I was able to take it apart and glue it back on, it's worked ever since. If it rattles, you'll know that's the issue. Not an easy job getting that bezel off and back on. Otherwise, send it to Joel.
    1 point
  16. Thanks Guys. I spoke with Joel. He advised to NOT send it in and waste my money. He says it's very rarely a mechanical issue in the tach. Usually the electronics have gone bad. Guess I'll start searching for an aftermarket replacement. I'll check the relay as well.
    1 point
  17. My Stelvio is very efficient. I got close to 50MPG on a 400 mile ride recently, and I was not being gentle. However, a carbon Mistral slip-on fuel injection trim module are the way. So I will try to be less efficient. Interestingly, the FI Trim Module (from MG Cycle), claims to work with Mistrals on Stelvio, V11, and several other Guzzis. I have the Moto Guzzi Titanium Race exhaust on my Scura, but have not messed with the ECU. I think I will try this plug-and-play module on the Scura. I assume the MG race exhaust is similar to the Mistrals.
    1 point
  18. Not simple, all the things you do with the cute little thing , learning to know the gal, some times WTH , IT'S worth it. Just saying. Cheers tom
    1 point
  19. Bob, did you secure the wires coming out from the switch ? IPA time here Cheers tom
    1 point
  20. 1 point
  21. Thanks, from what I was reading/watching I get this part, I was interested in the hows and whys of completing this task. If you wanted power "in the old days" you went with torque, your lubrication is crap and you don't want to rev high and blow up, so your cylinder is long and thin, the combusting gas exerts it's force all at once on the piston, the lever is long and you get a big slug of torque. But an oversquare cylinder needs revs to make power, but it's harder to cool with air, and it's hard to rev fast with pushrods 'cos your valves might start to float. So is a guzzi engine kind of on the edge of what is possible with the design? Yeah I get this bit, they want to sell yesterdays tech at tomorrows prices and it works! I was really interested in how the Guzzi engine manages to make decent power, when by some accounts it is hamstrung by it's own design. So to get decent power from a C1100 v-twin, it seems manufactureres tend to make it oversquare, which usually requires water cooling / multi-valves and OHC, Guzzi just didn't seem to go down that road, which I love.
    1 point
  22. I would go with what he says ^^^ Night and day difference, and if you do it and it still runs like shit then you know at least you have ruled out the obvious!
    1 point
  23. Swept volume means very, very little when comparing different engine designs.
    1 point
  24. Replace your light relay (Number 2 from the front).
    1 point
  25. La notizia che Moto Guzzi stia preparando un nuovo motore da circa 1000cc non è una novità, anzi è "vetusta". Però i vari nuovi motori V100, progettati e messi al banco non hanno mai superato lo scoglio finale della messa in produzione, non certamente per problemi tecnici, ma per i soliti problemi economici e di gestione dell'Azienda. Recentemente, però, in Moto Guzzi sono arrivate nuove assunzioni e sul lago di Como si torna a respirare un'aria di fiducia intorno all'Azienda di Mandello del Lario. Il traguardo delle 12000 moto prodotte, farà soridere molti, ma per Guzzi è un traguardo importante e un numero che non si vedeva da decenni. Proprio questo rilancio ed il fatto che nel 2021 la Moto Guzzi festeggia i suoi primi 100 anni, in molti scommettono sulla presentazione di un nuovo motore V100 che potrebbe equipaggiare una nuova moto. Anche in questo caso non si tratta di un vero scoop, perchè già alla presentazione del nuovo V85 si era parlato di un progetto di ampio respiro che avrebbe visto il nuovo motore crescere di cilindrata fino a 1000cc. Forse ora i tempi sono maturi, anche perchè in molti vorrebbero una V85 TT più potente ed ecco che il nuovo motore potrebbe essere la soluzione per permettere a molti possessori della V85 TT di fare un up-grade, senza lasciare il marchio ... Una potenza di 100CV ed un prezzo ancora sotto i 15mila euro potrebbero essere le carte giuste per confermare l'attuale successo commerciale Moto Guzzi ed attirare nuovi potenziali clienti. Non ci sono conferme ufficiali nè rumors attendibili, ma sono in molti a scommettere che Moto Guzzi per i suoi 100 anni ci regalerà una bella sorpresa. The news that Moto Guzzi is preparing a new 1000cc engine is nothing new, on the contrary it is "outdated". However, the various new V100 engines, designed and put on the bench, have never overcome the final obstacle of putting into production, certainly not for technical problems, but for the usual economic and management problems of the company. Recently, however, new hires have arrived in Moto Guzzi and on Lake Como there is an air of trust once again around the Mandello del Lario company. The milestone of 12,000 motorcycles produced will surprise many, but for Guzzi it is an important milestone and a number that has not been seen for decades. Precisely this relaunch and the fact that in 2021 Moto Guzzi celebrates its first 100 years, many are betting on the presentation of a new V100 engine that could equip a new bike. Also in this case it is not a real scoop, because already at the presentation of the new V85 there was talk of a wide-ranging project that would see the new engine grow in displacement up to 1000cc. Perhaps now the time is ripe, also because many would like a more powerful V85 TT and here the new engine could be the solution to allow many owners of the V85 TT to upgrade, without leaving the brand ... A power of 100HP and a price still under 15 thousand euros could be the right cards to confirm the current Moto Guzzi commercial success and attract new potential customers. There are no official confirmations or reliable rumors, but many are betting that Moto Guzzi will give us a nice surprise for its 100th anniversary. https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.crazywheels.it/52-moto-test-e-co/moto-guzzi/14173-novit%C3%A0-moto-guzzi-v100-2022-rumors-opinioni-previsioni.amp.html
    1 point
  26. I suppose I must perform another session of epoxy reconstruction surgery on my original, but it is certainly showing it's been on the leading edge of these miles/kays. Thanks for keeping me in mind if you spot one or have one taking up valuable space . . .
    1 point
  27. I'm cautiously optimistic. They've been in service long enough by now that if they were going to break, we'd have heard of at least one.. Unlike the OEM design, the spring calculator says they "shouldn't" break.
    1 point
  28. Sprang goober & ain't got none ...... please , don't talk over our heads .
    1 point
  29. Nice old SP there too! (My buddy has an SP, bought it new, has clocked 203K miles on it, never been torn down and runs like a top).
    1 point
  30. While this is a good start I can see why it would be intimidating for a beginner or someone who just wasn't familiar with a V11. So I'm going to try to break it down even more. The first attempt will be without the Breakout Harness. Apparently it can be done, just not as elegant. I'll update the first post as I learn more. And there will be pictures, a LOT of pictures. You cannot have too many pictures. I not only welcome feedback it's going to be required. Please respond and respond frequently. Questions will be in italics. I'l add pictures as I go along. So let's start with what Docc has provided and expand some more. 1) Using a Casper's TPS Breakout Harness (or equivalent) This was $30 with shipping and got to Oregon from Colorado in two days. Breakout installed. You need to strip the purple (pos) and purple/black (neg) wires so you can measure them. Leave the yellow alone. 2) Disconnect the right throttle linkage Prior to disconnecting the throttle linkage I took a measurement of the TPS. Not sure it shows anything useful. I had to use a screwdriver to pry the throttle linkage off. But it just pops off. 3) Release the upward facing slotted screw for the high idle cam 4) Back out the difficult to reach 2.5mm idle stop set screw To get mine back out completely took a long time. 5) Clean the throttle butterfly (if necessary) I was happily surprised that once you loosen the hose clamp the intake hose slides back. Very nice! As a side note I measured the TPS voltage before and after cleaning, this should give you an idea that you should at least consider cleaning it. Before cleaning After cleaning 6) Loosen the TPS fasteners only enough to tap it or budge it slightly, it is very sensitive. 7) Changing the TPS fasteners to standard hex drives simplifies the process (4mm/0.7 thread pitch x 17mm long). I had some screws that were the perfect size, except they are countersunk heads. Because someone jammed an Allen wrench into the Torx screws I had to use these until I can get the right head on the screws. But the countersunk ones hold just fine. 8) With a good voltmeter, adjust the TPS to 150-157 mV. Realize the TPS value changes when it is tightened down, so just repeat until you're in range. 9) Reconnect the throttle linkage I needed to use pliers. I also put a smudge of silicone grease on the ball before re-assembly. 10) Set the high idle cam so it just nudges the throttle when engaged. 11) Leave the right side idle stop backed out. Buttoned up! Like I said info will be added to this until anyone can walk through the steps. Especially me!
    1 point
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