Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/17/2021 in Posts

  1. Yes, she feels at home. 1day today, NOT FOR SALE. NOT much for total original. Duc 900 faring? Original paint tank, sidecover. 17500m. [emoji16] [emoji482] Cheers Tom Sent fra min SM-A525F via Tapatalk
    12 points
  2. @Kostarika posted this pic in his Gallery, but a lot of members don't pay attention or comment there. This stunning image deserves front page news, IMO . . .
    11 points
  3. It's been ages ago since i sold my v11 Sport, but after some HD, a Norge and a Cali i finally got a V11 Lemans 03 and hope to put on a lot of km's .
    10 points
  4. Here's my 2000 Sport, when I caught the perfect morning light....
    10 points
  5. This is my 97 RS which Pete has mentioned, it currently has the Euro fairing/headlight and a full Staintune exhaust system. I changed the belts a couple of years ago but it still has the original oil pump which will have to be addressed at some point in time though it has low miles. I know others have taken the gear route but I was just going to get the V11 series oil pump and a set of chains whenever I get around to doing this work. In terms of selling the bike, I'm a bit on the fence as I really like riding the bike though it kills my neck after about 150-200 miles. These bikes are more comfortable for someone who has some long arms and that is not me. And to be honest I have no idea what one is currently worth. This bike was originally owned by a collector who put no miles on the bike and it sat in a basement in Wisconsin until about 2003 when my friend David bought the bike. He only put maybe 3,000 miles on the bike and then I have put another 2,500 miles on the bike. It is fun to ride, and the engine is like no other Guzzi.
    9 points
  6. I've had two doses of AZ, no side effects apart from the penis falling off thing but I managed to stick it back on with gaffer tape and blu-tac. It doesn't get much use nowadays anyway. Annoying side effects of the magnetism, I ended up dangling off the diff housing of a Land Cruiser on a hoist by my head at work and they had to pry me off with a crowbar......
    9 points
  7. Here's a link to my photos. Rode by myself, ate by myself, so not many of the fella's rides but a few of the Tech Session discussions. https://photos.app.goo.gl/GANxnBUhZKdSAd4C9
    8 points
  8. I left early this am, didn't get a chance to say goodbye to all you fellas. Sorry about that, I didn't want to interrupt the Sat nite Tech session last night and it was too early this am (0630 hrs) to knock on everyone's door. Had a great time, did some really fun, fast riding and will be one of my special memories when I'm too old to ride. Also learned a lot from all. Good times, already looking forward to a go next year. Everyone travel safe!
    8 points
  9. Some things are worth repeating. Nice, Dave!
    8 points
  10. Nice ride followed by a photo op.
    8 points
  11. Excellent choice of machine. Went on a ride out around Derbyshire today with some friends, I was on my Griso 8V, seen here parked next to a friends fabulous MK1 Le Mans, whilst we were stopped for tea & bacon butties
    8 points
  12. I was all set to buy a Monster 1100 earlier this year (last of the air cooled), then this Greenie came up for sale, only 5K miles, and with a lot of money spent by the previous owner (new clutch, frame & swing arm powder coated, belly pan and lots more including a LeMans style bikini fairing that I’m yet to fit). The price was right, next thing I know it’s in my garage next to the others. The Monster will now have to wait until next year….
    8 points
  13. I thought I'd bring everyone up to date on my latest acquisition and modest project. I bought the Interceptor for one purpose really, a hassle free pillion bike. Cheap and cheerful modest power, just something for the wife and I to do cafe jaunts on and ride to our favourite restaurants for lunch or dinner in the summer. I took one for a test ride and was underwhelmed by the power but quite happy with everything else esp the value. Here they are just under $10,000 ( I think in the states they are around $5500 or so) on the road and comprehensive insurance is cheap as well. The things that have been compromised to keep the costs down are things that are easily and cheaply replaceable, so plastic indicators and tail light assy, mirrors, levers etc. I replaced those with aluminium LED units and also did a few zero/low cost workshop stuff to enhance the looks and mitigate the cost cutting. Remember the frame was designed by Harris Performance in England where RE's brand new R&D facility is and their chief tester and developer is Paul Young a very handy ex British Superbike racer so it's got quite good bones. So I removed the std foot lever toe pieces and replaced them with Woodcraft folding units and added lightening slots to the levers. The rear tail light housing and front fork brace was finished in a utilitarian grey paint which was removed back to the alloy and given a satin finish and a coat of clear. The handlebar cross brace which serves zero purpose was ditched and the mufflers replaced which saved around 20lbs and made the 270 deg engine sound like a Ducati. The rear plastic guard extension was shortened as well and a 16 tooth countershaft sprocket to gear it up a bit. It's a nice thing to ride and re acquaints you with how much power you really need or in fact don't need in the real world. The engine is silky smooth with it's 270 deg crank and balance shaft. Valve adjustment is screw and locknut. The efi system is faultless in operation and it even uses the exact same mini relays a V11 does. The brakes are surprisingly adequate and ABS assisted and replacement parts are laughably cheap. I replaced the std seat with a RE accessory unit which is a little taller to give my wife less knee bend. Total cost shipped to my door, around $150usd and 7 days from India! It's quite amusing though in that I'm used to riding bikes that require concentration on the speedo on the road and you often find yourself thinking "That's a bit over where I want to be". Not the RE, it's the opposite. A glance at the speedo is mostly rewarded with a "Oh I can open the taps a little here, lol" It's relaxing and just what I need for a pillion bike. I dont want to be reining in a bike with the wife on the pillion seat. It will perform ok and give adequate overtaking performance but it needs to be ridden harder than you're used to after riding much more powerful machines. Reminds you a lot about how much power you actually use 98% of the time. If you want more, S&S make a drop in 850 kit for them. The forks could use some enhancement but the rear shocks are adequate. The only future mods may be a set of Stainless Steel brushed finish big bore header pipes and forks internals. So with parts for the V11 getting harder to source and for those wanting to keep the Guzzi mileage down and ride an economical to own, cheap to buy twin that's relaxing to ride , I rate the Interceptor. Stock Now Details. Aftermarket mirrors, levers, Yamaha R1 quick action throttle and grips, reworked brake and shift levers, SS reverse cone mufflers, seat, new aluminium indicators and tail light and housing re work. Ciao
    7 points
  14. SpineRaiders are serious about their TechSessions. "Bring Tools" really struck a chord with HRC_V4 and Tom in VIrginia. Thanks for all the contributions, guys! Other than the miraculous missing (but caught in the wiring harness!) bolt find on Randy's Coppa Italia, the TechSesions were largely electrical . . .
    7 points
  15. 7 points
  16. Quick update ... life is a circle ... the PJPR01 gentleman is a very good friend and former co-worker, Guzzi lover and motorsports fanatic ... we just reconnected yesterday because of this forum ... so I'm feeling thankful and confident I meant to own a Guzzi Centauro
    7 points
  17. You know docc I've been having a conversation on another forum about such matters and the folly of the " as an owner I shouldn't have to get involved in any way shape or form with any of the technical matters concerning my bike" It's the manufacturers responsibility to take care of that and warranty. Well good luck with that I say. You may be very lucky but when it hits the fan at some point you'll pay the price of not at least having some reasonable familiarity with your bike or car in the technical sense. People actually think in the car and motorcycle world that skilled competent dealership mechanics are everywhere and it's just a matter of a quick phone call and a visit and your problems will be rectified. What I like about the people here is everyone takes it as a fact of ownership that you need to be technically aware of your machine. When I was young paying someone to work on your machinery wasn't really an option, who could afford that, so you developed skills and knowledge. Like pre ICE days when you relied on a horse to earn your living or for transport, most people couldn't afford a Vet so they learned how to care and husband the animal. Times it seems have sent people down a blind alley in some respects. Ciao
    7 points
  18. These are probably my two favorite photos from the weekend:
    6 points
  19. Mighty impressive group of bikes on top of the excellence and effort put forth by those who came . . . SpineFrame Raiders: 1996 SPOrT 1100, silver 1997 1100 Sport-i, yellow 2000 V11 Sport, silver 2001 Rosso Mandello, rosso speciale 2002 Le Mans. champagne 2003 Coppa Italia 2003 Ballabio, red LoopFrame Raiders: 1971 750 Ambassador, burgundy 1973 850 Eldorado, white CARC Raiders: 2007 Norge, molto molto rosso 2008 1200 Sport, tuxedo black&white Honorable SpineRaiders: 1993 Ducati 900 SS, arrest-me-red 2000 Moto Guzzi Quota 1100 ES, red Guests: Honda ST 1300 Yamaha TDM Kawasaki KLR BMW "The / " California 1400, black with champagne
    6 points
  20. More -- actually, way more than needed, of course -- will follow after I get home. In meantime, did buy this from the 129 guy ... Bill
    6 points
  21. I don't know who brought the fake oil spill, but Randy slept in Sunday, so he was last one to get it. The guy with the Honda seemed a little ruffled when he found under his ST1300 . . . Fair warning, Randy has it now and can mess with whomever he thinks will "enjoy" it the most. (Notice how docc knows precisely where an oil spill is most likely to occur under a V11. )
    6 points
  22. https://www.moto.it/news/moto-guzzi-v100-sport-tourer-motore-a-v-raffreddato-ad-acqua-120-cavalli-scoop.html On the technical side we have the news that will make the happiness of those who love the Italian eagle. The new Moto Guzzi V100 marks the birth of the new engine platform. In fact, the transversal V-engine with liquid cooling arrives, which is necessary in view of the future anti-pollution regulations, which are increasingly severe. The Italian company looks to the future with important investments that will lead to an expansion of the offer. The new 1000 engine, which on this version could already develop a power of about 120 horsepower, will in fact be used on maxienduro models, but also sporty ones, given the important performance and low weight. And it is easy to assume that the new platform lends itself to the development of different displacements, both larger and smaller. Without obviously renouncing the shaft drive. On the new Moto Guzzi V100 we will certainly find the most advanced electronic controls (traction, ABS, cornering), which have already been developed by the group on recent Aprilia and Moto Guzzi models. The wait at this point is very high, but we bet there will be little to wait. Official photos were being taken today. The Moto Guzzi V100 is therefore ready and will be a star of EICMA. Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
    6 points
  23. What's that noise? Oh the sound of 60 million Italians groaning "Mamma Mia" and palms hitting foreheads. Ciao
    6 points
  24. Never tried a 1200 Daytona, I did own a few Hinckley Triumphs a few years ago before getting submerged in the world of Guzzi’s. The polar opposite of the V11 was a Speed Triple 1050S with a full Arrow system. It was a fantastic hooligan bike, felt like a genuine street fighter, but it encouraged very fast riding, I felt like I had to be pushing the envelope all the time, and eventually I sold it around 3 years ago before I lost my license Where the Speed Triple was short & flickable, the V11 feels long and stable. The weight bias is towards the rear being a shaftie. The brakes are excellent and even the non ohlins machines handle well. However if you are used to a multi cylinder bike the V twin could feel raw & unrefined. Close the throttle and the engine braking is immense. I find that part of the attraction of the Guzzi. Whilst it’s been said a thousand times before, the V11 is a motorcycle of character and rider involvement. They have been hand made in Mandello del Lario in relatively small nos. Where I ride Truimph Speed Triples, Beemer GS’s, Gixers, R1’s etc etc are everywhere. A V11 is a rarity. Heck every Guzzi with the exception maybe of V7’s are a rarity around here It’s a motorcycle with soul, the sensation of the transverse vibration. It’s unique, but not for everyone 1429
    6 points
  25. So, repair and maintenance done, I am packing and loading today. Not the Norge, but the chase vehicle, our 2009 Honda Fit, with 258K miles. It's a C-130 of a car, and today I am the loadmaster and crew chief. I am ensuring that the critical supplies make the trip: Bourbon. Check. Grappa. Check. Espresso machine. Check. Tools and fluids for depot-level maintenance. Check. That pretty much does it, and there's still lots of room for Kathi's six weeks of essentials for a 5-day (for her) trip.
    6 points
  26. I agree Pete and your point is a valid one but I'm a bit of an engineering purist plus it goes deeper as well. The modern engine is a wonderful thing as long as it's a "good one" Will give many trouble free miles without any issues. The modern mass produced philosophy falls apart though over the long term and the short term if you have a serious issue. The long term may not bother you and fair enough but here's an example. My Sunday drive car is a Focus RS 2.3 Turbo 4. The engine is as is common practice these days a friction drive camshaft system, no crank or cam keys on anything as god knows that would cost and extra $10 in machining and 3 keys. The Upshot? well now you when you need to do a simple job like change the front timing cover crank seal here's the process. Release the crank pulley bolt, the cam timing is now gone. Remove the cover and replace the seal. remove all the cam drive and oil pump drive to fit new friction drive washers behind the cam drive sprocket. Remove the HP fuel pump off the exhaust cam, remove the vacuum pump off the inlet cam remove the cam cover and then the drive end and journal off the inlet cam so you can install the cam timing tool. Install the crank TDC stop. Re fit and seal the front timing cover set the cam timing and then torque up the TTY pulley bolt without disturbing the cam timing and re assemble half the freeking engine. This is what you get to save a few pennies on some keyway machining. Now the hard part, how many Ford dealership workshop drones do you think are capable of doing this task without screwing up at least 1 of the processes. Ford had a recall on this engine to replace head gaskets and when I saw what was involved I predicted a world wide total catastrophe for owners. I was proved totally correct, it's been a nightmare for just about every one of the 27,000 owners involved. Not me fortunately. This is the modern corporate engineering philosophy in practice. personally if they offered and old style build engine at a premium cost I'd be the first to opt for that if for no other reason than a dealership mechanic would have less chance of screwing up any significant maintenance when it's required. Ciao
    6 points
  27. They'd never be able to make competitive 'Modern' power with an OHV set up. The reason the TB/s are central and the exhausts exit on the outer edges of the heads you can tell it's a DOHC set-up as the cams have to run in the same plane as the crank. if you look at the Caponord 1200 motor you can see a lot of similarities. I can't do photo's here, I always forget how, but if you look at a Caponord engine in the parts list you can see where the idler gear shaft I and then the two camshafts under the head cover. It's standard Piaggio/Aprilia design and mimics a lot of the engineering in the Rotax motors used in the RSV twins. I'm looking forward to seeing what else is in the motive unit. People we're always wingeing that the Gen 2 Hi-Cam *Only* made 100hp. I always found it amazing that it did! It's a very compromised design but it will make 100 rear wheel ponies and not a lot more, no matter what people claim. To get serious HP and meet E5 a DOHC and water cooled powerplant was the only way forward. Unfortunately the forced adoption of OBD II protocols spells the death knell of remapping by aftermarket sources and home tuning. From here on in we're at the mercy of the manufacturers. Bring on the E bikes and whatever comes after them and let's stand at the stern rail and wave our handkerchiefs in farewell to dirty old fossil fuels! Our grandchildren will thank us.......
    6 points
  28. sorry you got the slow black one. But you'll be fine
    5 points
  29. Today, my bike arrived. It is an 8.5/10, with 10 looking new off the showroom floor. I can work with this bike. Everything is there, and she wasn't beat to $h!t like every other V11 I saw locally. Naturally, all the sticky eagle badges are missing. I'll order 4 of those (two for side covers, one for generator cover, a new one for the triple tree)... I didn't get to ride it, and the earliest they can get it in the shop is Nov., so, it is what it is. She started first time, very strong, very nice sounding. The upswept Mistrals (?) have a nice booming sound, but not very obnoxious. No smoke on startup, so valve stem seals should still be okay. When running, held in the clutch...yep, it's a Guzzi. Rattle rattle... I'm more and more getting the appeal of these machines. I asked them to replace all the fluids (incl. fork oil), do throttle sync, valve adjustment, new fuel and vacuum lines, new metal fuel filter, cut me two new key blanks, and mount a set of Diablo IIIs...plus, if they find anything else, I asked them to let me know. Darn, I need to ask them to mount a Roper tray while they have her. No oil starvation for me, please! I didn't realize how tiny the V11 is in person until now. Just slightly bigger than my M696. The V11 is even sexier in person, especially in black. Yowza! I guess I'll get to ride her in 2022, because the shop is swamped with work at the moment. Oh, well. Something to look forward to next year then. Enjoy your V11s, friends. I will join you on the roads with mine next year, unless a miracle occurs...Going to be a loooooong winter.
    5 points
  30. One must be careful what one asks for . . .
    5 points
  31. On the injectors used on V11's and CARC bikes the o-rings are a standard Bosch injector seal. I just buy them from my local *Better* auto parts joint in Canberra. Just take the injector in and brandish it at the parts interpreter. If they gurn vacantly at you and ask "What's it out of!" Try to resist the temptation to bury your index finger down to the third knuckle in their eye socket, thank them, leave, and go and find a real parts shop where they pay decent enough wages that the staff don't spend half of them on clearasil and wet-wipes.
    5 points
  32. As much time as I have spent on, and with, my RedFrame Sport, I only recall riding two other SpineFrames. Interestingly, a previous generation 1100 Sport-i and a next-gen LongFrame Café Sport (with handlebars and forward set instruments/headlamp). I immediately found both of them less 'responsive' to cornering input, more "stable", if you will. And discovered my RedFrame Sport offered the perfect (for me) riding posture compromise between the rather "committed" 1100 Sport-i and the more upright, handle-barred, LongFrame Café Sport. My first riding buddy, RIP, always told me the perfect number of bikes is five. I paraphrase, "Sometimes you want a glass of milk, another time: Bacardi. Another day, a comfortable reclining chair, then to be shot out of a cannon." I reckon mySport has done all of these things for me. Otherwise, how could she still be soldiering on, so admired and trusted? JMHO, YMMV
    5 points
  33. I have one long and one short frame. They are unique enough to own them both, especially with the long frame being LeMans bodied. I'm not competitive and don't pay much attention regarding negative or positive handling details that change lap times by seconds. I do know what I like however and I like them both, for the same reasons but on varying roads. Whats clear to me is that when the road gets tight and twisty the red frame is more in it's natural setting. Sweepers are my favorite roads because I can go faster safer and enjoy the view somewhat as well. The LeMans is at home here and honestly the rewards are greater. I suppose it comes down to a rider's style. You can't rate a bike without the human.
    5 points
  34. So is there a consensus amongst the Guzzi community about their preferences? Short red frame & short tank (chinpad) long black frame & short tank (chinpad) long black frame & long tank (internal fuel pump) On balance I find black frames feel a little more planted in corners. Must be the 20 mm longer wheelbase plus all the extra bracing around the swing arm / subframes. I don’t feel the fatter 180 rear tyre has much of an effect in slowing the black frames turn in. I have a 2002 transition model (registered in 03),and the extra 20 mm of frame visible behind the steering head doesn’t bother me. I don’t find it aesthetically less pleasing than a long tank
    5 points
  35. 80XC100 asked me how I feel the MT01 compares to my Guzzi’s It’s very difficult to pigeon-hole the MT01; it’s no sports bike, it’s not a cruiser (but it’s got a cruiser engine), it’s not a tourer. Perhaps that’s why when it was in production from 2005 ~ 2011 it was a sales flop. They’re as rare as hens teeth here in the UK as well, but now rapidly achieving cult status. I think they look incredible - Mad Max meets Godzilla, they have massive road presence, and wherever you park it, it always draws a crowd usually with “what the hellisthat” questioning. Some folk confuse them with a Yamaha Bulldog 1100. Firstly I have to say I’ve never ridden any Buell, in the UK they are also as rare as hens teeth, so I can’t use that as a benchmark. The MT01 is a torque monster, 2000 rpm = 60 mph. It’s only a 5 speed box, but unless you doing 80 mph+ you rarely need 5th. Overtaking anything up to close to the ton is easy, open the throttle and the wall of torque pushes you forward like a warp drive. At 4500 rpm it’s all over! But it’s a very tall heavy bike, something like 260 kgs wet (574 lbs), and it feels like it carries it’s weight high. You have to work hard in the twisties, at the time of its production, some road testers praised its handling, but you can’t forget it’s bulk, it turns in slowly despite not having a massively long wheelbase (1525 mm; V11 black frame 1490 mm; Griso 1554 mm 61”). I think the suspension is a little under damped for it’s weight. After an hour or so in the saddle, you need to take a break from the vibration. On the plus side the finish is incredible, polished pushrod tubes, the extruded aluminium frame looks like a work of art, mine is 16 years old and still looks terrific Today I took the MT out on the same route I did on my Griso 8v last Sunday, and my Greenie 2 weeks ago In terms of ride satisfaction my scoring is (1)Griso 8V (2) V11 (3) MT01 I will write a more comprehensive comparison when I have more time. My conclusion is the MT01 is too much of a niche bike - great to have in your stable if you can indulge yourself with several bikes, but too compromised to be a great all round riders tool. The Griso 8V is a great all round riders tool, and the V11 is a worthy runner up, just edged into second place by the fabulous 8V Guzzi big block. I have to say that if I could only have one bike I’m my garage it would be a hard choice between an Öhlins equipped V11, or a Griso 8V, but it wouldn’t be the MT01
    5 points
  36. Just want to say that I have PM'ed with a couple of you (Chuck, LuckyPhil, Denis, others) and I'd like to specially thank Weegie who's literally an encyclopedia on anything related to the Centauro (and other Guzzi's). I got quickly hooked up with both Will and Joe Caruso and am in love with my Centy. Thank you all ... I'm illiterate in motorcycle mechanics (despite owning 7 now and several other the years), but I have chose the Centy to change that Hope to contribute some to this forum ... thank you all
    5 points
  37. Ready to launch here ... on the Guzzi shown in avatar. The burdens of a (moto-)harem. The Norge is (almost) ready. Will do a check ride tomorrow with Kathi, The Perfect Pillion & Polish Princess. I'll head SE on Thursday; RON somewhere along the way that night. TPPPP will cage it on Friday in the old (as in '09, with 258K miles! ) Fit. Always nice to have a support vehicle chasing me ... at a distance. Bill
    5 points
  38. If your V11 weighs 500 pounds, its probably out of fuel . . . I can remember two, or maybe three, female forum members. I think two of them actually rode V11 and the other had some pretty V11 jewelry on offer. Recalling just a few lady riders coming through our local "sport-touring" community reminds that the more talented ones chose bikes that fit them well (shouldn't we all?). The most adept of these wore full leathers and rode a Honda Hawk GT. Quite svelte, nimble and capable. The bike, too.
    5 points
  39. I got my J&J vaccine shot as soon as I was eligible for it. Actually I got it as soon as I was even somewhat eligible for it, I signed up for it before I was 100% eligible for it but by the time of the appointment I was eligible. I had no issues with side effects, nor did the wife. We still wear masks when indoors among crowds. We still try to be careful. The big concern is not spreading the virus to others. Too many people think the primary purpose of a mask is to keep the wearer of the mask from getting sick. I disagree. I believe the primary purpose of a mask is to keep people who have the virus from spreading it. I don't wear a mask to keep myself from getting sick, I wear it to keep you from getting sick. The surgeon doesn't wear a mask during surgery to keep himself from getting sick, he wears it to keep the patient from getting sick. It seems we as a planet are incapable of doing what it takes to overcome this. So it seems we will be dealing with it for a long time. People are unwilling to make the required concessions, unwilling to do what is required to do. Everyone wants an easy button for this, and they thought the vaccine would be that easy button. But they did not understand that it doesn't work like that.
    5 points
  40. 5 points
  41. From my cold, dead hands. They have been saying gasoline would run out since when my father was a teen...in the 1950s. Oh, it will run out, but we have a very long way to go, and the electrical grid can't take 100-300 million cars/bikes charging daily. Most of that power is from dirty coal. You forgot the destruction and costs of rare earth metals. One of the largest mines is in...Afghanistan. Another is in...China. These are unrealized costs. It is not about hate, but choice. It is not an ICE or E-BIKE only thing. But, they do nothing for me. 100% torque at zero RPM is a bit dull. I need noise, vibration, drama, passion. It is like reaching orgasm with no buildup, no foreplay. I prefer to be astride a living, breathing, belching, smoking, vibrating motorcycle. Something with a manual transmission, where I can feel the gears move under my foot when I shift, not some twist-and-go nearly silent, soulless appliance. Full disclosure, I have never rode an electric motorcycle, but I've watched enough YT reviews, and watched enough "Guzzi tunnel run" videos to know which I will select. "Guzzi tunnel run" videos are why I started taking a look at the V11 and will shortly add one to my stable of other fine European machines. Electric bikes? Leave that to the vegans. I will eat steak and ride a Ducati/Guzzi. I wish people with electrics all the best, truly, but no thank you. Electric cars/bikes are coming, no doubt about that, but I will not hasten the death of ICE cars/bikes. I can't freakin' wait to get a V11.
    5 points
  42. 5 points
  43. Basically it can fall until it's below the level of the pick-up. Oil has three functions, to clean, to cool and to lubricate. As long as there is a supply it can do all three but the lower the volume the hotter it will run so the less well it will cool. The amount of contaminants in it will proportionally increase as the volume diminishes so it's like trying to wash yourself in dirty bath water. It will keep lubricating though to the bitter end. It's only when flow to the bearings is interrupted that chaos and destruction ensue! Of course the lower the level the greater the chance on a V11 of the pick-up being exposed under acceleration and if that happens? It's all over Red Rover! In a matter of seconds!
    5 points
  44. Please don't misunderstand, alternatives are fine with me. I know it's coming. I don't deny progress or inevitability. Doesn't mean I have to like it, endorse it, welcome it, want it, or wish it. "bring on the E bikes?" ok, so the E bikes are here and I'll watch them fail, fail, and fail in sales... until governments prop them up, younger people buy them, and people like me are gone. A friend once said to me, while watching a very bad movie "just because they make a movie, doesn't mean you have to watch it" ...drunk, but wise. There is a bigger conversation to be had about "the environment" and personalities, for one answer "why shite to that"...and that would be a but welcome conversation. People (enthusiasts) my age have the unfortunate advantage of watching the demise of ICE's. Those who welcome/encourage it I would say, don't understand the motorcycle experience the way I do. That's fine too, ... you do you , I do me,.. liberte'. I'm just an end user and don't give a crap about tech or green. All visceral, no pretense. I like to think that's why I'm here.
    5 points
  45. There *is* a need, however, to keep the automotive type clutch, driveshaft, and rear drive. That will make it recognizably Guzzi.. IMHO.
    5 points
  46. Finished up taking the dents out and repacking the second TI race can. Polish the headers left to do and I will be back on the road ready for summer and when our current lockdown finishes!
    5 points
  47. I took the V10 for a ride the other day after all my riding lately being 2 up on the Royal Enfield 650 which has quite a nice easy shifting gearbox. The ride on the Guzzi reminded me how good the Guzzi 6 speeder was shifting. Feels nice and tight and precise as opposed to the RE which is direct and has a mechanical feel but looser. I still think the RAM lightweight clutch is a giant leap forward with regards to Guzzi 6 speed gearbox operation. Ciao
    5 points
×
×
  • Create New...