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  1. Coastal trip. Cheers Tom. Sent fra min SM-A525F via Tapatalk
    14 points
  2. What a great thread!! It is so important to recognize the visceral nature and emotional impact of the bikes. I was immediately attracted to the V7 Sport, but did not own a Guzzi until 1977, when I purchased a T-3. I rode that for a year and then traded it on a 1978 Lemans 850. That may have been the best motorcycle I have ever ridden, but sadly I crashed in 1979 and then took a wrong turn toward BMW ownership. 5 bikes and 20 years later I returned to my true love when I purchased a V11 Sport in 2000. I put 60,000 blissful miles on that bike until a women yacking on her cell phone ran a stop sign and totaled her out. I spent the next 10 years searching for a replacement and luckily last year I found her in Missouri. I am once again experiencing motorcycle bliss and I intend to ride this incredible machine into the sunset!!
    14 points
  3. Seasons greetings all................ love this site thx to all. Ciao
    14 points
  4. This Sport officially made 200.000 km today. In fine form. I pulled over to record the moment. The most poignant feature in the image? The road ahead!
    14 points
  5. Yes, she feels at home. 1day today, NOT FOR SALE. NOT much for total original. Duc 900 faring? Original paint tank, sidecover. 17500m. [emoji16] [emoji482] Cheers Tom Sent fra min SM-A525F via Tapatalk
    14 points
  6. @Kostarika posted this pic in his Gallery, but a lot of members don't pay attention or comment there. This stunning image deserves front page news, IMO . . .
    14 points
  7. https://www.bikeexif.com/ghezzi-brian-moto-guzzi-1100
    13 points
  8. Mallory Park, Festival of 1000 bikes event this weekend organised by the Vintage & Classic motorcycle club, here is the Moto Guzzi Club GB “tent” being set up, we have several Guzzi’s on display including my Rosso Corsa Really hot day, temperatures reaching 85 F, lots of track day action on the circuit, fabulous opportunity to meet many other Guzzistas and see a wide variety of bikes classic & modern
    12 points
  9. Domenica tour Lecco - Passo San Marco....molto divertente!
    12 points
  10. A week ago I posted concerns about replacing my original fuel pump at 125,000 miles/ 201.000 km. Turned out that restart stumbling was a fluke, perhaps a bit of "vapor lock." Has not recurred, so I moved on the my 5,000 mile/8.000 km oil change/ tune-up interval. Some observations: > I use the filter access cover to change the filter. Last change was the only time I found the filter stuck. This time I LIBERALLY oiled the gasket, both the surface and the sides. I remembered to inspect the old filter to be sure it brought its gasket out with it and also shone a light up into the sump with a mirror to be doubly certain no old gasket remained in the engine. I did not remember to peel the WIX sticker off the filter, but have run the label before with no issues. I prefer to remove them. "One less thing," you know. > The Sport ran so great yesterday, I was mildly surprised the spark plugs looked so awful. The gap had opened from 0.0275" to ~0.033. One side of the plugs showed a nice coloration and the other side (especially the right) was all crusted with carbon deposits. I'm thinking signs of needy valve seals/ guides. > I've been concerned my valves are sinking into the heads, especially the left exhaust. Pleasantly surprised that I relaxed the right side I/E maybe 0.0005"/0.0127mm just to get a nice, loose slide on the feeler gauge blade. I found the left side both at 0.007"/ 0.018mm, so slacked the exhaust a thousandth and snugged the intake a thousandth of an inch. Very pleased. > My TPS had drifted from 157mV to ~134mV. For the first time, I purposefully held the throttle firmly closed to set the TPS. This looked to make about a 10mV difference. I feel like I should be indexed to the map better. Thanks to all of those who have patiently helped me understand this importance. > I have been skipping the Decent Tune-up step of removing and cleaning the air bypass screws/circuit. Not sure the last time I did that, but the tips of the air screws weren't just sooty, but crusty and a lot of black gook and particle washed back out of the passageways with throttle body cleaner spray applied repeatedly until the wash-back looked clean. Again, pretty sure my old Sport is burning its share of oil via the valve seals, but I won't skip that step again. _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Out for a warm-up ride to balance the throttle bodies and, five miles from home, she coughs hard - sputters- picks up again- coughs - sputters- barely runs or idles as I nurse her in to a safe spot. She dies, making me think about that fuel pump again. Off the bike, I retrace everything I just had my hands on. There it is: I had left the TPS break-out harness connected and the bare leads had wandered their way to ground. Detached it, plugged the TPS in directly and motored happily away. Note to self: > After setting the TPS and removing the voltmeter, see that the break-out harness is removed and TPS is plugged back in directly. ~ ~ ~ " I won't skip that step again. " ~ ~ ~
    12 points
  11. For my son Landon. I know the gasoline ICE purist will not like the fact that its an electric bike, but that's the world young Landon grew up into. The EFTR Jr is a replica of the FTR Carbon, capable of 7mph in low and 15 mph in high settings. It has front and rear brakes with rear adjustable suspension. Learning battery charging management will probably do him well in his lifetime. My first bike was a smoking(literally) Italian made 50cc two stroke, Indian badged import from the 70's, I loved that bike and its still in my parents garage today.
    12 points
  12. Il mio ideale di presepe! My ideal nativity scene!
    12 points
  13. Final ride of 2021. Tried to take a run up Mount Palomar, but wet roads and low visibility turned me away. Happy New Year everyone.
    12 points
  14. The 'fits and niggles' of our era Guzzi are a result of an old world motor co being kept on life support by passionate Italian folk who simply refused to let it die. Guzzi was a normal competitive motorcycle co. and relative equal in the moto world till the CB750 emerged in '69. A day of reckoning for every other brand as well. It was up to the "driven" players and the bean counters to make necessary changes (if the money was there) or let your marque die. So think of it from the business decisions made at the time while many other brands went by the wayside, Guzzi moved ahead with what they had. An old motor they couldn't afford to replace, and the desire to build and sell bikes. They spent what they could on what they felt was a priority. Internationally, police motorcycles kept a cash flow. Dr John Wittner gave them the public performance injection needed at just the right time. Sure there were other models available but the spine frames were what kept the marque moving forward technically, at a pretty dark time. When I look at the stupid wiring or bicycle grade gauges, or sub standard castings, or obvious afterthought arrangements, I see acceptable loss when all that mattered was a price point that had to be reached. I see passion and patriotism, and love. I don't get the feeling they were cheating in any way to just make money. (C'mon, you know nylon is not what designers preferred for gas tanks) What we're left with is the answer to a math problem several decades old. The sooner you think of your bike as the Italians had to to just get her produced and to market, the sooner you can learn to have a glass of wine and just enjoy the relationship. Just change what they could not. To me 'strange and quirky'.. are, for my Guzzi, terms of endearment.... like... "my girlfriend is crazy" but you should meet her, and you'll see everything about her is not "standard."
    12 points
  15. Finally, an update. It has been about 3 hours since I got to actually ride the V11, and I haven't come down yet. Oh my word, what a machine. She's a bit unrefined, but still...dignified and graceful. I confirmed before setting off all the lights, horn, brakes, etc. all were functional. No smoke on startup again, no terrifying and expensive noises within the sump telling me to replace bottom end bearings...just the normal V11 noises I'm told to expect. Again, hold the clutch in...rattle, rattle, rattle...Love it. There were a few idle surges while things warmed up for 5 mins or so before I set off. While riding, I confirmed the speedo and odo BOTH work...simultaneously...on the same V11...and the ODO reset knob is still present and works. One less thing, right? I arrived on a 900SS, a stark contrast to the V11. I don't have to address the elephant in the room, the style of the V11. She is sexy and elegant. Enough said. The ergos on the V11 are more standard than sport, in spite of the clip-ons. Lots of vibration through the grips at nearly all RPM (hands got numb after 20 mins. I have to address this), I got zero vibration through the stock footpegs, which is exactly opposite of what I was told to expect. Strange. The saddle was very wide but firm and comfy. I expected to be punished with the stock saddle, but I was pleasantly surprised! AF1 Racing in Austin, Tx. got me a NOS black seat cowl and all the fasteners and washers (still waiting to be shipped to me when the fasteners arrive). I am waiting on the cowl "moon" pad from a gent in Italy. No rush, as I won't ride her again until Spring of 2022. The gearbox was BUTTER! Click-click-click...effortless shifting, just effortless. I was beside myself in the refinement of the gearbox. Better than even my 900SS...blasphemy! No false neutrals, no matter how many times I tried---and I tried to upset the gearbox. But, firm, deliberate shifts are what worked best as many wise members of this forum informed me. I stopped, clicked up, never popped out of gear under any scenario. Just a sweet gearbox. Great work, Guzzi! I wasn't on bad roads, but the suspension felt firm and slightly bouncy over undulating pavement. About what I expected, but it wasn't bad. Steering was pretty average, or more, of the wide turning radius type. One thing I will need to get used to, is that super forward kickstand. Wow! I know it is for clearance issues, but it is going to take me a LONG time to get used to the kickstand location when I want to park the bike or set off at first. Guzzi does everything differently. The brakes were adequate. They just did the job, but a lot of lever input was required to get the machine stopped effectively. The tires were hardly used but old Dunlop SportMaxes, and I wasn't going to dump my baby and grind the side of a cylinder head pretending I was qualifying for the Isle of Mann TT, so I kept the leans to a casual tempo. Turn in was still excellent and composed. Tracing a line and cliping apexes was so smooth and effortless, belying the weight of this bigger lady. As many told me about the torque-effect of the shaft drive, and the V11 didn't disappoint. At a stop, a few blips of the throttle leaned the bike slightly to the right repeatedly giving me a chuckle. The stock cans as I understand are a bit muted, so thankfully the previous owner had great taste and donated a set of Mistral conical upswept cans for my listening pleasure. They are boomy, baritone, but perhaps 7/10ths the sound put out by my 900SS's carbon Termis. It's not fair for me to say which I prefer, they are just both their own personality. That said, the Mistrals are NOT quiet. They just boom along as the engine hums underneath you. They fit the more laid back/standard ergos and personality of the V11. What a machine! You hit the wall of torque at 2k and it just keeps pulling and pulling. You have to rev this engine to get the most out of it, but it spins up pretty fast. The engine is eager to deliver a smooth helping of carmel-like torque. She really is industrial in her own way. Rear weight bias is evident once underway...wow. Truly, more of the weight is on that back wheel, and you feel it when you go WOT, the front suspension lets up, and you feel the front end starting to rise two or more inches. It is a very different balance than I am used to. On the plus side, the weight feels so much lower than I would have thought! You just have these two giant aluminum cylinders sticking out in front of your knees in the airstream. I feel like I am riding a wingless WWI biplane. Ha ha!!! I stopped by a gas station after legally touching an indicated 80mph on the highway, impressed. I topped the plastic/nylon acerbis tank with sta-bil to at least minimize the damage of the ethanol while it is stored until I get her back in April '22...and I was sad to end the ride. I wanted to keep on going, and the big Guzzi certainly felt obliged to please me. FINAL THOUGHT: These machines are like flying a WWI wingless biplane. The V11 is still an underappreciated jewel in the motorcycle world, and I am fortunate to have gotten (a NICE one, lots of junker V11s out there!!!) before too many people discover them and make them cost new bike money. Physically small, yet feeling big and agricultural in some ways, nevertheless, this sultry Italian lady has class, curves, style and is full of brio. Bellissima! What a damned fine motorcycle. I only regret not getting one a LOT sooner! I finally got to officially drink the kool-aid and join the cult! Now, where are the cookies?
    12 points
  16. It's been ages ago since i sold my v11 Sport, but after some HD, a Norge and a Cali i finally got a V11 Lemans 03 and hope to put on a lot of km's .
    12 points
  17. In honor of St. Patrick's Day, I took out the Green Goose today! Rode into Amish country, avoiding horse puckey on the road, took a mountain (well, what passes for a mountain in central PA) pass (lots of gravel and salt -- I almost walked around the 10mph hairpin switchbacks), and got back into town following a magnificent sunset. Stupidly, I didn't think to get a pic until too late, but I snapped this image after before it was lost completely: Look at that!!! Where is the "jaw on the floor" emoji? What a beautiful piece of machine art. You can walk around these V11 for hours trying to find the best angle to look at them from. And riding it is just as special. I can't make claim to being a great rider, I don't have any idea how to dial-in suspension settings, and I've haven't ridden scores of bikes for comparison purposes. What I do know is that the grin on the face sets in just after rolling out of the driveway. Literally. One moment it's a hooligan; another (around the ton) it's stirring milk tea. Pretty great combination, that. Cheers, Frey
    11 points
  18. Rosso Corsa in Norwegian sunset.
    11 points
  19. Leading indicators that you are about to have some great tacos: You just had a brisk 100-mile ride. There are more Spanish than English words on the signs. The picture on the sign is of a pile of raw meat. Carniceria is one of the words. Panaderia is one of the words. You have to walk under an arch to get in. Wrought-iron is featured (in this case a wrought-iron arch, so bonus points). The wood chairs are all painted different colors. An old man wearing farm-work clothes and a straw hat is by himself, reading the newspaper on the patio. There is a dirty, beat-to-hell old Ford truck in the parking lot (this was true when I parked, but sadly replaced by a Hummer by the time I sat down with my tacos.) There are more than three flavors of Jarritos in the fridge. And proof: Two el pastor, one carne asada. Two fresh corn tortillas per taco. With onion, cilantro, pico de gallo, guacamole, hot sauce and lime. The real deal.
    11 points
  20. Hi folks! The rumors of my death have been greatly exaggerated, just like ol' Mark Twain said. All is good. I have been away from this splendid forum way too long. Hiatus is over, I hope. Not too many trips with Mizz Greenie so far. She runs like a dream, except for the occasional coughing at +/- 3500rpm. Last time I tried to hook up GuzziDiag it failed. I will try again. Would love to load Meinolf's map onto my 15M ECU I hope you all are well and having a good time. (The photo is from the lake Nord-Mesna last Saturday. Captured from my iPhone on a rock using Apple Watch as a self-timer. Yeah, I know.. fancy pants)
    10 points
  21. This story will be told in pictures and they will probably be few and far between.
    10 points
  22. Protest songs and political statements in songs are as old as the road to Rome. And everyone is free to agree or disagree. Hell, I don't agree with everything Bob Dylan wrote. But as you all know, a political discussion is not allowed on this forum! My suggestion: Everybody is free to post music vids. All I ask of you is to think carefully what you post here. And for the people who disagree with the content of some of these videos: just don't react. It's not that hard. Thanks!
    10 points
  23. I’m fortunate to have the best riding buddy ever, she rides the Honda CB 400 Super Four, which an awesome bike, & I’m on the Cafe Sport. We went camping down to the south west of Western Australia for a few days, it’s winter over here so it gets chilly in the evenings, we needed rain gear at times, but that didn’t put us off. The roads down here are lovely & bendy, the scenery is great & with a wood fire plus roasted marshmallows in the evenings., it was just the best. Another trip is currently being planned..
    10 points
  24. I never liked the look of Guzzi’s when I was a teenager riding Yamaha & Suzuki two stroke twins & triples in the 80’s & 90’s, I used to think the proportions were all wrong on Guzzi’s of that vintage. That was until one day I saw a Daytona parked in a car park, I had to go over & take a closer look, “wow” I thought “ that’s a Moto Guzzi,.. they can get it right.!” I loved the muscular stance of it & walked away pretty impressed. A few years later I was looking for a bike & was intent on a Ducati 1098, although after a test ride I thought, “I’ll lose my licence on this for sure”. A few days later I spied a Coppa Italia in the window of a local Guzzi dealer, I had to go & check it out. I was quite smitten but unable to afford it, the dealer did however have a 2004 Cafe Sport for sale which I could afford, I took it for a test ride & loved it, I thought then & still think now that there is no better sounding motorcycle, particularly with the cat removed & some nice pipes fitted. Mine has a mistral crossover & nice pair of Australian made Staintunes, & imho it sounds like a symphony!. I’ve owned it for the last thirteen years & the more I ride it the more I love it, dropping it deep into a bend scraping my boot off the road & opening it right up on the exit is just the best..
    10 points
  25. Here's a little preview of one of my favorite roads... I sent you a message with exactly what road this is.
    10 points
  26. https://www.visordown.com/features/top-10s/much-appreciated-top-10-motorcycles-yesterday-are-classics-today
    10 points
  27. Greetings, The site has been tremendously useful to me. I figured it was high time I joined. I bought the scura from eurosports LV. My V7 needed a big sister. Thanks to all the unnamed heroes who have helped me without knowing it. Motorcyclists are the best folks in the world and Guzzista are the best of those.
    10 points
  28. Visited the MEBC today (Moto Euro Breakfast Club). Check out the lovely new MV Augusta Turismo Veloce Lusso. Bodywork is the same color as my Scura's frame plate. And let's not ignore the Brutale 1090 hiding behind that...
    10 points
  29. My apologies if this crosses any boundaries, but @Lighting posted this spectacular V11 image in the "Gallery", yet not everyone sees things there or gets to comment on them. Such a moving and inspirational V11 image. Thanks, @Lighting !
    10 points
  30. Making some progress: Disassembled and cleaned ignition and starter switches, and various other electrical connections Got a bunch of powercoated parts installed, including the top triple clamp (steering bearing had almost no grease) Noticed rear brake disc is badly worn (thanks to the sintered pads...) Plastic T lamp holder is barely holding itself together (fortunately I had a new one already tucked away) Cleaned injector and throttle bodies (god I hate those tiny screws that hold the injectors in) UFI oil filter characteristically left the O-ring stuck in the engine. There's a Wix in there now. Still waiting on some goodies... but the Speedhut gauges have shipped. Looking forward to getting those in place. Thinking about gloss black powdercoat for the wheels. Building a list of little bits needed from Harpers.
    10 points
  31. Finally managed to source some Ti 10mm button heads in grade 5 for a reasonable cost. Ciao
    10 points
  32. Here's my 2000 Sport, when I caught the perfect morning light....
    10 points
  33. Our V11 sure does look right with certain classic shapes. One of the drivers in this Porsche Club freaked out over the V11 Sport, having "never seen one in person" . . .
    9 points
  34. Over a quarter million miles of Moto Guzzi sitting here; original owners . . . Over 400.000 kilometers is down the road a piece.
    9 points
  35. Friday afternoon off and friends to meet at our country-store/Best Reuben in the World hangout. On the way home, got this shot of a couple old, greasy smokers parked next to one another . . .
    9 points
  36. Took the “grape ape” V11 for its annual MOT roadworthyness test today. A pass so it’s back on the road after the winter hibernation. Oil & filter changed, but it needs a good tune up,
    9 points
  37. After being sorted a bit, she’s back to daily rider. An Ohlins shock, Racetech springs, and Road 5s (160 rear) are really working well. 95 is the new 80! That’s MPH, not my age.
    9 points
  38. Been curious on Dynotech.de for years. So came back this morning after 3 days in Germany with a 99 hot rod [emoji16]. 1200ccm, at least the bench papers says 108 hp. Will find out in about 65 days. First owner spend close to 40k € on the bike [emoji85], good for me, 2 owners. Got all the reciepts. Cute little thing. Original color is Legnano green. Defnetly a good friday here [emoji482]. Cheers Tom. Sent fra min SM-A525F via Tapatalk
    9 points
  39. Hi guys, am back after a break while my V11 was spending time at Sean’s moto spa and rehab center. I was pretty much off-line a lot for the time, which was nice to take a break from the screen. Anyhoo, the badass V11 green goddess is back on the road with a new Mistral crossover, Ohlins shock, Racetech fork springs, and a bunch of little leaks and other stuff sorted out. Also now running a Roper windage plate and the Chuck & Scud shift spring and bracket, as well as Knight Design lower pegs. All of this compliments the Michelin Road 5’s I put on her recently. She’s running great, fun as hell, the suspension upgrades really brought her to life. I have a few more things to sort out like a dead speedo and a few more leaks to chase, and I have just received from Ghezzi-Brian a carbon rear hugger and pretty nice looking red pod filters, so am planing on cleaning up the rear wheel and air box areas. In the meantime I’ve been using the Hypermotard as my daily driver, and managed to get a 1,000 mile camping trip on her up and down the coast which was a blast. Also been borrowing an Energica electric for a bit which is a hoot. But since getting the V11 back on the road, and with the upgrades and improvements, I still love this bike the best. It’s good to be back on the Guzzi. I hope all has been going great for you all. Cheers!
    9 points
  40. I used to work in automotive(4 wheels) aftermarket parts, even before I was riding a Guzzi. It struck me that all parts that we distributed for all brands of vehicles in Europe, were not very usable for the Honda and Suzuki motorcycles that I was riding. Later, when I started riding the LeMans 2 (in 1999, so it was already an "oldy"), I saw all kinds of parts that were considered universal in the stock of this aftermarket distributor on the LeMans. Sparkplugs, contact-breakers(standard for alfa, fiat, marelli), ignition coils, starter motor, revision parts for the generator, headlights. Wiring colors were the same as Fiat, connectors the same, battery was standard(good price)etc etc. The whole machine can be maintained in an agriculture workshop, tolerances are not very critical, tools are mainly standard or easy to make. This machine is a dream for everybody that has basic engineering interest. You get a lot of confirmation that you improve, because things are understandably explained in available manuals, parts are relatively in-expensive and available, and repairs turn out to be successful (or it is easy to do it again). On top of that, parts for newer models are often compatible with older models (and improved). I know it sounds ridiculous, but in the end you come to love each nut and bolt in the machine. Just look at this forum where people talk on the wire thickness of the retainer spring for the shift mechanism, and the little bolt on the jiffy, and the 20mm or 19mm red-frame/black frame discussions and many , many more. That is unique, I enjoy this very much and I am in constant adoration of those that have discovered again new perspectives on parts, types and even nuts and bolts. I love to be part of that.
    9 points
  41. Earlier this year somewhere in the Belgian Ardennes.....
    9 points
  42. Last ride before hibernation today, l think. Nice weather with 6c. Home 6.30,, 2c = V cold knees. Cheers Tom Sent fra min SM-A525F via Tapatalk
    9 points
  43. Some things are worth repeating. Nice, Dave!
    9 points
  44. I was all set to buy a Monster 1100 earlier this year (last of the air cooled), then this Greenie came up for sale, only 5K miles, and with a lot of money spent by the previous owner (new clutch, frame & swing arm powder coated, belly pan and lots more including a LeMans style bikini fairing that I’m yet to fit). The price was right, next thing I know it’s in my garage next to the others. The Monster will now have to wait until next year….
    9 points
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