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Nihontochicken

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Nihontochicken last won the day on June 3 2018

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About Nihontochicken

  • Rank
    Guzzisti

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  • My bikes
    2005 Suzuki DR650, 1980 Bultaco Sherpa T, Bultaco 360 Astro, 2004 V11 Naked
  • Location
    Originally El Lay

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325 profile views
  1. Does it leak oil and refuse to run at times?
  2. Looks familiar! Here's the link to my leak thread. https://www.v11lemans.com/forums/index.php?/topic/21629-my-first-oil-leak/ Snippet: "Also, I noticed all the hold down bolts were the same size except the top rear bolt, which is markedly shorter. Is this correct, or a Bubba mistake? Also one and only one steel washer dropped free from one of the bolt seats. Should all, some or none of these Allen head hold down bolts use washers?" Looks like Bubba really gets around!
  3. It appears that Guzzi under the auspices of Piaggio has very limited R&D funding and a loss of sense of direction post V11 and MGS-01. Some of the ensuing small block bikes have a small bit of the old LeMans flair, but certainly not the performance. The large block entries have been a styling disaster as well as technically disappointing at times. It may be that the air cooled big cylinder has become an anachronism in the modern emissions world. If water cooling is now technically mandatory for good performance, then the reason for the traditional MG layout goes away (two jugs sticking out in the breeze at a 90 degree included angle that provides good primary balance). And seeing the problems that have occurred in both the MG and airhead BMW drive lines, I'm not convinced of the supposed maintenance ease of a shaft versus chain final drive (a chain and sprockets of decent metallurgy and fully enclosed by an easily removable thin metal or plastic envelope would likely last nearly as long as a shaft drive and certainly be cheaper to manufacture and easier to service). Of course, a big twin with a chain final drive is the domain of Ducati, on which MG is unlikely to trespass. I'd like to believe that MG will still come out with a new, large capacity sport bike in the spirit of the LeMans, V11 and MGS-01, but I sense that they don't have it in them any more, alas.
  4. Yep, yep, yep ...
  5. Nope, nope, nope ...
  6. Oooooohhh, bright red valve covers. Must resist, must resist ...
  7. I'll take the OEM fairing: 100.00 + shipping PM to follow.
  8. Getting into the swing of social distancing now. Here I am today about to go to the grocery store:
  9. I've done nothing, this is how the scooter came fro the original owner. I'm guessing it's just the amount of bolting force on the bar anchor. When I dropped the bike on its left side in the driveway , the bar anchor joint didn't rotate, only the ball joint moved, enough to keep the mirror from breaking (a scuff on the rim only).
  10. As I mentioned in another thread, I'm happy with my CRG barend mirrors, tucked in, give a decent rear view, and one of mine even survived the V11 driveway drop test. CRG makes many other styles, link below if interested (no relation, my mirrors came with the bike when I bought it). http://www.constructorsrg.com/mirrors/index.html
  11. Here's a closer shot of the critical parts (not showing the typical T-handle and bit holder on opposite ends). I'm quite limited on the size of pictures I can post here, so this is the best I can do after shrinking the frame, and hence the rather small pics earlier. Shown also is the original mailing box, but I don't still have the receipt, alas. Now that I think of it, the tool may have cost closer to $75, but I'm just guessing now, it was a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away. Note, I corrected a misstatement in my post above. "Depending on how far the sliding hammer is rotated with respect to the Delrin buttons, the tool may be used to either tighten or loosen screws or bolts" should instead read "Depending on which way the sliding hammer is rotated with respect to the Delrin buttons, the tool may be used to either tighten or loosen screws or bolts." Of course, only an idiot would use an impact driver to tighten a fastener, it is generally useful only for loosening. Some specialized bits to cut new slots in buggered screw heads were supposed to be included with the tool, but Joe was out of them when he sent my example, and I never did get them. Too bad, they would have been useful in a few cases.
  12. Colder ... Warmer ... And we have a winner! It is indeed a specialized impact driver. Depending on which way the sliding hammer is rotated with respect to the Delrin buttons, the tool may be used to either tighten or loosen screws or bolts. The degree of rotation will vary how much force is delivered to seat the screw or bolt and how much is applied as a torque. Once loosened, a fastener could then be unscrewed with the T-handle wrench. It was made about fifty years by Joe Bolger of Barre, Mass. I think it was about $50, a fair piece of change back then. What a "serious" rider would have in his kit, along with his safety wire twisting tool.
  13. Here are the tools I generally use: A bit more seriously, as I was going through my old tools, I came up with this one. Anyone wish to identify what it is? Bonus points for naming the maker and approximate year of manufacture. Double bonus points for explaining why this tool was intended as an improvement over its more usual competitors.
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