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Tom M

Veglia Gauge repair

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I recently removed my gauges from the gauge panel while trying to fix a speedometer problem. I decided that now was a good time to try and get the speedo bezel off and repaint the needle since it had faded completely to white after 8 years and 32k miles. I couldn't read the speedo at all at night which is no fun when you're being followed by a police cruiser. Unfortunately I didn't think of documenting this process until I was almost done with the tach so I don't have a real good set of pictures.

 

There's no easy way to get into the Veglia gauges because the chrome plated brass bezel is crimped on to the one piece gauge housings. Others on the forum have said that it's not too difficult to uncrimp the bezel with a a few home made tools but I couldn't find any description or pictures of said tools so I improvised. I ground and bent the tip of an old flatblade screwdriver into sort of a pointed spoon shape to lift the crimped edge of the bezel, then used a screwdriver and a modified pair of needle nosed pliers to straighten the crimp enough to allow bezel removal. I cut the end off of another old screwdriver and ground it flat to use as a punch when recrimping the bezel. I'm pretty happy with the results since you can't see any marks on the gauges once they are reinstalled in the panel and both needles are now legible at night.

 

I don't have a pic of the beginning of the uncrimping process but this one shows how I used the needle nose pliers. I cut one jaw down and wrapped a little tape around the other so it wouldn't scratch the chrome.

IMG_0962.jpg

 

 

Here's the tach after I painted the needle. You can see my modified screwdriver and pliers along with the bezel parts.

IMG_0960.jpg

 

I clamped the gauge to the bench to compress the rubber gasket a bit then worked my around the bezel with the punch slowly folding the bezel back over.

IMG_0963.jpg

 

 

Recrimping is finished with no marks on the visible part of the bezel.

IMG_0965.jpg

 

 

Done. Too bad I didn't take a "before" shot to show how faded the needles were.

IMG_0970.jpg

 

 

 

I'm sure there are better ways to go about this but I hope this helps someone else who wants to try and repair their Veglia's instead of buying new ones. If anybody else has done this and has a better method please post it up.

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Well done Tom and thanks for the excellent write up!

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I recently removed my gauges from the gauge panel while trying to fix a speedometer problem. I decided that now was a good time to try and get the speedo bezel off and repaint the needle since it had faded completely to white after 8 years and 32k miles. I couldn't read the speedo at all at night which is no fun when you're being followed by a police cruiser. Unfortunately I didn't think of documenting this process until I was almost done with the tach so I don't have a real good set of pictures.

 

There's no easy way to get into the Veglia gauges because the chrome plated brass bezel is crimped on to the one piece gauge housings. Others on the forum have said that it's not too difficult to uncrimp the bezel with a a few home made tools but I couldn't find any description or pictures of said tools so I improvised. I ground and bent the tip of an old flatblade screwdriver into sort of a pointed spoon shape to lift the crimped edge of the bezel, then used a screwdriver and a modified pair of needle nosed pliers to straighten the crimp enough to allow bezel removal. I cut the end off of another old screwdriver and ground it flat to use as a punch when recrimping the bezel. I'm pretty happy with the results since you can't see any marks on the gauges once they are reinstalled in the panel and both needles are now legible at night.

 

I don't have a pic of the beginning of the uncrimping process but this one shows how I used the needle nose pliers. I cut one jaw down and wrapped a little tape around the other so it wouldn't scratch the chrome.

IMG_0962.jpg

 

 

Here's the tach after I painted the needle. You can see my modified screwdriver and pliers along with the bezel parts.

IMG_0960.jpg

 

I clamped the gauge to the bench to compress the rubber gasket a bit then worked my around the bezel with the punch slowly folding the bezel back over.

IMG_0963.jpg

 

 

Recrimping is finished with no marks on the visible part of the bezel.

IMG_0965.jpg

 

 

Done. Too bad I didn't take a "before" shot to show how faded the needles were.

IMG_0970.jpg

 

 

 

I'm sure there are better ways to go about this but I hope this helps someone else who wants to try and repair their Veglia's instead of buying new ones. If anybody else has done this and has a better method please post it up.

i always zero the tripometer when i fuel up. if you do it also you're getting MUCH better fuel mileage than i am. :-D

cheers,esteban

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When I did it, I bored a hole .005" larger in diameter than the bezel in some plastic sheet, and pushed it in. That keeps the bezel from deforming,and makes an easier job of it..

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When I did it, I bored a hole .005" larger in diameter than the bezel in some plastic sheet, and pushed it in. That keeps the bezel from deforming,and makes an easier job of it..

 

That's an excellent idea Chuck. When I was prying the crimp up I saw the bezel flexing and thought that making a "nest" for it would make it easier but I didn't have the right hole saw available. Since you cut the hole .005 larger I'm guessing you have some machine tools available? I'm jealous.

 

Did you come up with a better tool than a ground & bent screwdriver for prying up the crimp on the bezel?

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When I did it, I bored a hole .005" larger in diameter than the bezel in some plastic sheet, and pushed it in. That keeps the bezel from deforming,and makes an easier job of it..

 

That's an excellent idea Chuck. When I was prying the crimp up I saw the bezel flexing and thought that making a "nest" for it would make it easier but I didn't have the right hole saw available. Since you cut the hole .005 larger I'm guessing you have some machine tools available? I'm jealous.

 

Did you come up with a better tool than a ground & bent screwdriver for prying up the crimp on the bezel?

 

Yeah, I have a machine shop, and nope, did it like you did.. :D

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Excelent job Tom, I pried my speedo apart last month with a screwdriver and a pair of sidecuters to bend back the crimp, your special pliers made a much neater job.

The odometer on mine had jambed up stripping the worm on the plastic drive shaft. I pulled the tumblers apart and swapped them around from left to right so the worn parts are now on the left where they get little use. Hopefully the shaft has enough grip left to turn the smaller trip odo.

 

Update,

I decided to do my tacho as well, made the special tools to yur specification, workrd better but still marred the ring somewhat. It really needs a solid support ring just larger than the bezzel with a pivoted lever to turn back the crimp

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Could we get a long-term-test report? How is the paint holding up? And what kind of paint did you use?

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Well done to those that have done the de/re crimp. I always thought it may be possible to machine up an aluminium end cap that sleeved into the body and was held in place by a couple of 4mm button head screws.Carefully cut the old one off and rob any necessary bits like bulb holders etc and use on the new end cap. Then you could access the instruments any time you needed to. From those that have had them apart would this be viable?

 

Ciao

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I *think* it would be possible, but it's been years since I've been in one. You'd still have to get the bezel off to freshen up the needles, though.

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Here's how I got into a speedo recently

 

Using a dremel I cut through the retaining ring at the back where it would be hidden when in place by the instrument panel.

Cutting the metal into small lengths so that as they were almost straight they would bend up easily.

 

 

Putting everything back together, which I dont have a picture of, I held the assembled parts down onto a bench with a wood clamp & using a punch worked each strip of metal back into place.

A bead of clear silicon sealed the cuts & when mounted in the instrumental panel can't be seen.

Like ThisIMG_0027.JPGIMG_0028.JPG

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I *think* it would be possible, but it's been years since I've been in one. You'd still have to get the bezel off to freshen up the needles, though.

Oh Ok, I thought that the whole internal mechanism would be attatched to the back of the instrument.

 

Ciao

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Could we get a long-term-test report? How is the paint holding up? And what kind of paint did you use?

 

The paint has held up really well after five+ years and 18k more miles Scud.  I bought the paint at a hobby store but I don't remember who the manufacturer was.  It's probably still kicking around my basement so I'll post that info if I can find it.  I think the color was "international orange".

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