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Fuel leak


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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 2 years later...

Dear All,

 

Just thought you'd like to know that since I Did this repair 2 years ago I have had no leaks or problems at all! Still going stron!

 

Ride safe

 

Pete

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... I've got some Hylomar Universal Blue which is fuel resistant and the local old school motor factors bloke said it's just the stuff. ...

 

Yes, it's a must in every shop. On the older tubes they said it comes from Rolls-Royce. Actually I don't know whether that's still the case, but in the 80ies it was.

 

Hubert

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Good to hear... What can't that "Hylomar" do?

 

You can't use it in thick layers.

 

Another typical case for it would be mounting the valve covers without the paper gasket. I used it even instead of the head gasket in two stroke engines (on a non professional basis of course).

 

Hubert

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... I've got some Hylomar Universal Blue which is fuel resistant and the local old school motor factors bloke said it's just the stuff. ...

 

Yes, it's a must in every shop. On the older tubes they said it comes from Rolls-Royce. Actually I don't know whether that's still the case, but in the 80ies it was.

 

Hubert

 

If I remember correctly it was developed for Rolls Royce for their engines .Still good stuff .

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  • 6 years later...

Super helpful to have this documented!

My V11 developed a fuel leak while it was in storage this past winter, and I've localized it to a slow seep at the fuel level sensor.  After leaving it overnight, I peeled back the rubber boot, I found it filled with fuel.  So, I'm wondering if the leak is somehow through the body of the sensor, rather than past the screws or around the o-ring. 

I can't recall any mentions of this, but maybe someone else has or has ideas about whether it's likely or repairable. I've got blue goo, but the weeping continues....

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Here's what one looks like.

IMG_20210409_190149374.jpg

The wires are potted, but if that sealing washer was cracked..

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You can take the correct size wrench and loosen the nut by one flat and retighten the nut until it is SNUG . Or you can remove the tank and install a new o-ring and remove the tank 3 Xs , install a new low level sensor just to realize you could have done Step # 1 .

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Much obliged gentlemen.  Regarding removing / reinstalling the tank multiple times, hanging it partly full to ensure no leaks, installing a new o-ring and blue-goo, eyeing a new sensor on Ebay....guilty.

I've never had the sensor out of its mounting fixture, so it's time to check that washer. Seems like a likely culprit  given the pooling into the boot. Any harm in applying a thin coat of non-hardening fuel-resistant liquid gasket to the washer (assuming it's intact) ?

The upside is that this leak pushed me to finally get some EtOH-free gas and groom the rubber pucks.  

Just anuther day with the V11.  :mg:

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

 

This looks to be sorted, so thought I'd post an update.

My issue was a slow fuel seep from the fuel level sensor, which had never been off the tank since I purchased the bike new. Gas was collecting under the rubber boot, so after seeing the photo Chuck posted, I suspected it was seeping through the potting or one of the mounting flange-washer-sensor mating surfaces. I guessed that the leak would be less localized if the tank-flange interface (ie - the o-ring) was the problem instead.

I pulled the sensor and found the aluminum washer at the base was pretty cruddy. Likewise there was material caked onto the rubber of the sensor housing itself. Guessing this was mostly calcium phosphate from EtOH-water issues. I also found that the sensor had come unglued from its rubber housing, perhaps because the rubber had swollen over the years (see photo).  The mounting flange and o-ring had a bit of caking as well.  

I cleaned everything up, re-installed with Permatex non-hardening liquid gasket, and leak tested O/N with a 1/2 tank of gas.  Next day…TA-DA! No leaks…what a hero! I filled the tank on my victory ride, and sure enough the wife complained of gas smell in the garage-adjacent TV room that same night.

I'd had enough. I bought a new sensor and a tube of the reputedly magic Hylomar, drained and dried the tank, and brought it inside where I could work on it patiently. All mating surfaces got skim coats of Hylomar, which was allowed to dry thoroughly at RT before assembly. It's been about a week with no leaks.  I don't know precisely why the old one was leaking, but decided I'm ready to move on and live with a little more mystery in my life.
 

Leaking-fuel-level-sensor.jpg
 

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