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Bjorn

Rear drive needle bearing and swing arm restoration

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I would clean up the spacer til it is perfect . Then make a bushing to fit the bore of the hub and fit the spacer. The spacer is needed in holding the wheel bearings & other parts tight in the wheel .
 

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I would clean up the spacer til it is perfect . Then make a bushing to fit the bore of the hub and fit the spacer. The spacer is needed in holding the wheel bearings & other parts tight in the wheel .

 

That's amazing. I've never thought of how important that outside needle bearing/ bushing is in the axial load (side to side) as opposed to the rotation which we have long noted is minimal.

 

One more nomination for Impressive V11LeMans.com Member:     :notworthy:    gstallons   :thumbsup:

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Yes, replacing the entire bearing (inner and outer race) for a bronze bushing was my thought :) . But first things first, I need to get this bearing out. I have read this topic a few times, quite handy :

 

http://www.v11lemans.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=17881

 

Since I dont have one, im ordering a decent internal bearing puller. 

 

To be continued....

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The bearing used by Guzzi is particularly weird because its outer race had a hole in that would seem to be there specifically to allow the ingress of water! Removing the bearing can be done quite simply with the expanding puller tool used for removing the needle roller bearings from the five speed gearboxes used on earlier models. With this, and the box on the bench, its a five minute job. The bearing is a generic type apart from the bloody stupid hole! A visit to any bearing factor will get you a new one for not much money WITHOUT the bloody stupid hole. Just replace it and grease it regularly.

 

Pete

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alright time for an UPDATE:

 

I ordered a inner bearing removal tool to help me replacing this bearing. 

20140117_205736.jpg

 

This is used in combination with the ''expanding jaws'' part. This particularly tool has a range of 25-32mm.

20140117_205747.jpg

I never used such a bearing puller before so it was quite careful  :oldgit:

 

I tried to insert the puller underneath the bearing. This did not work because there was no room at all. So I tried to use it under the rollercage. I tried with patience, and with force but the bearing did not want to come out. I did see the roller cage moving. I dont think the bearing is easy to remove using this type of tool because you cannot use the jaws behind the entire bearing. I actually damaged the puller a little bit during this process. Nothing significant but the roller cage left markings on the jaws. 

20140117_221142.jpg

 

Before damaging anything I tried a different approach. I pried out the roller cage, leaving only the outer bearing race. I removed all the rust using a dremel tool and tig welded 3 small beads on the inside of the outer race (no filler rod).

20140117_233603.jpg

 

Due to the welds, the bearing race shrinks and could be removed using the bearing puller. I saw this method on the internet (thank you internet :notworthy:) and it actually works!

20140117_235721.jpg

 

Thanks for the tip Pete, for searing a identical bearing without the ''drainage'' hole. I will look into that.

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O yeah, two more things I would like to ask:

 

Halfway into the process I was frustrated and decided to open up the bevel box from the opposite site. No idea why really, I thought it would help. So I removed the 8 bolts in order to remove the cast aluminium plate, however I could not get it off. It felt like it was glued on or something. After this I came up with the welding method and did not bother removing the alu plate anymore. 

However, at this point I do wonder if its worth opening the bevel box? I have got the thing on the bench anyway, but im not really keen on replacing expensive seals/bearings because i was only curious. Anything worth checking here? (bike has got 40.000 km / 25.000 mile on the clock).

 

Secondly: I was wondering where do debris slipping past the needle bearing end up? could they reach bearings or even enter the bevel box?

naald%2520lager%2520debris.jpg

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If it ain't broke, don't fix it. At least that's what's kept me from going into the bevel box. However what I've never had apart and put together again, I can't talk with any authority on and remains, for me at least, in the very/too hard pile.

 

As for debris slipping past the needle bearing, it shouldn't go into the bevel box itself. If the oil can't get out that route, I doubt the debris will get in.

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Agreed. After taking my bevel box apart, then again, then again, I would only make the oil change and not overfill. Any dirt or moisture getting past the needle bearing will not affect the seals or bevel box internals, only the axle pushing through the "spacer."  Simply grease the axle well as it pushes through.

 

However, servicing the "cush drive" on your wheel might be good now!

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I Think i will keep it closed. I already have a massive ''to-do-list'' at the moment. So wont be missing the extra work :luigi:

 

As a matter of fact, I did service the cush drive. :D

20140104_215431.jpg

 

The next major thing is removing the swingarm bearings. Although they are OK, the swingarm shows lots of corrosion (mostly covered under the paint) and needs to be stripped and powder coated. So the bearings need to be removed.

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Looks like you did a wee bit more than just "service" it! :luigi:

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Ive just done the swingarm bearings at 25k ( miles) and would totally advise against touching them unless you reall have to.

My method involved welding and a lot of grief. Also at £50 each? Think seriously.

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Ive just done the swingarm bearings at 25k ( miles) and would totally advise against touching them unless you reall have to.

My method involved welding and a lot of grief. Also at £50 each? Think seriously.

Can't really do a 'spray and cook' job with them in, though, but I'm with you on "a lot of grief". Not something done without "language"!

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I know it wont be easy. I already ordered the bearings so i will proceed. There is no chance the current bearings will either survive the sandblasting and/or powder coating. Temperatures during the curing proces reach over 200 °C.

The stock coating on the swing arm is most likely powder coat as it is thick as h*ll. This is also the reson why it was still "intact" on the surface. However rust was eating away the metal underneath. I bet im not the only one with this corrossion. The only way to remove it seems to be sandblasting. This is why i chose this path, time will tell if it was the right decision

 

The plan i have now for the bearings is to grind out the inner bearing race in order to shrink/weld the outer race.

 

Here is a indication of the present corrosion:

20140121_224445.jpg

 

Maybe i should revise the title to include the swing arm part?

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