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What did you do to your V11 today?


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I recommend a light smear of "Hylomar" (really good stuff!) on both sides of the gasket. Remember that the timing chain is whipping oil at the mating surfaces.

I've done the timing chest a couple times and never had a need for a rotor puller. The crank isn't tapered it just uses a woodruff key.

The only trouble is keeping the crank from turning while you loosen the rotor nut. I usually lock the ring gear through the peep hole with a longish flathead screwdriver. It is a bit fiddly but can be done.

It took me like six-eight hours total the first time I did it, could probably do it in three if I hurried after doing it.

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Celebrated twenty years with the Sport today.   

Today I finished the new motor transplant and took it for a nice long spin! Fresh oil lines and a sweet new roper plate     

Changed out the stock mufflers for these nice Mistrals. These have a bit more rumble and pop than the stock mufflers. I really like the sound of the stock pipes, a rich deep tenor and smoother than th

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Hylomar is great stuff if you can find it. Loctite 515 gasket maker is good also . REMEMBER , just enough is all you need. Don't go hog wild with any type of chemicals on gasket surfaces. 

 I do NOT use silicone on any gaskets. After a while , the silicone will allow the gasket to creep and slide out of the mating surfaces .

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Isn't there an improved timing chain tensioner? Have any of you had experiance with that?

 

Just thinking while you've opened her up why not replace it.

 

Answered my own question. Here's the thread;

http://www.v11lemans.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=18899&hl=%20timing%20%20cover&page=1

 

Scud, that seems to set this up as your winter project.

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New Year's Day: 66 miles to meet a like-minded good friend. Low forties (ºF) made the heated jacket worth it  . . . until the controller failed. :glare:

 

Felt great to get out . . . mostly working on conditioning AGM batteries . . .

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While putting some new rear brake pads on the LeMans I made up a new "shop trick" that I thought I'd share: use a carpenter's shim to force the brake pads all the way back in and make it easy to get the caliper back on the rotor.

 

IMG_4365.jpg

 

BTW - it's very easy to do the rear brakes once you get the entire driveline and exhaust out of the way.  :grin:

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Moved the bikes so I could get to the snowblower.

Is it an 1100 cc V-twin snowblower?

 

It is only a matter of taking things off and putting things back together. Be sure to get a rotor removal tool to get the alternator off .

I've appreciated your past tool recommendations, such as the Pit Posse wheel bearing remover (works like a charm). Could I trouble you for a suggestion about exactly what rotor removal tool to get?

 

BTW - I ordered a timing cover gasket today.

 

No rotor removal tool needed on the Ducati alternator. It'll come right off. Keep the rotor and stator together, it's a permanent magnet alternator, and can lose it's ju ju if the rotor and stator are separated for an extended period.

You *do* know about the external ground wire to the regulator on this system, right?

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No rotor removal tool needed on the Ducati alternator. It'll come right off. Keep the rotor and stator together, it's a permanent magnet alternator, and can lose it's ju ju if the rotor and stator are separated for an extended period.

 

You *do* know about the external ground wire to the regulator on this system, right?

 

 

I had heard about the importance of keeping the electric bits together, but I always appreciate a timely reminder. And I have previously installed the bonus ground wire. That job doesn't look so bad after all - but it will have to wait till the LeMans gets back together.

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No rotor removal tool needed on the Ducati alternator. It'll come right off. Keep the rotor and stator together, it's a permanent magnet alternator, and can lose it's ju ju if the rotor and stator are separated for an extended period.

 

You *do* know about the external ground wire to the regulator on this system, right?

 

 

I had heard about the importance of keeping the electric bits together, but I always appreciate a timely reminder. And I have previously installed the bonus ground wire. That job doesn't look so bad after all - but it will have to wait till the LeMans gets back together.

 

Nothin to it, really..

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I finally had my Ghezzi-Brian rear hugger installed. Tried it without a lift and chickened out pulling the rear shock bolt so I put it back and had a local shop do it. I know , I wussed out..

 

It does look great though. It is a total pain to pop on but when installed looks awesome. It opens up the rear end and exposes that beautiful trellis swing arm. It's crazy that Guzzi covered it with that huge plastic fender.

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While putting some new rear brake pads on the LeMans I made up a new "shop trick" that I thought I'd share: use a carpenter's shim to force the brake pads all the way back in and make it easy to get the caliper back on the rotor.

 

IMG_4365.jpg

 

BTW - it's very easy to do the rear brakes once you get the entire driveline and exhaust out of the way.  :grin:

Doing the rear brake pads on the V11 is easy thankfully. These Brembos are pretty nice to work on. Small though. I am amazed how they threw on such a small caliper on a 550lbs bike. Can't wait to get my Scura with the 4 piston caliper from a V11 Jackal. Should of had a 4 piston from the start.

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While putting some new rear brake pads on the LeMans I made up a new "shop trick" that I thought I'd share: use a carpenter's shim to force the brake pads all the way back in and make it easy to get the caliper back on the rotor.

 

IMG_4365.jpg

 

BTW - it's very easy to do the rear brakes once you get the entire driveline and exhaust out of the way.  :grin:

 

Scud, I used the exact same trick. Works great and is progressive, so hard to overflow the reservoir using these.....

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Scud, I used the exact same trick. Works great and is progressive, so hard to overflow the reservoir using these.....

 

 

Cool - I had never seen it done before, and when I tried it I thought "I can't be the first person to do this - it's soooo easy." I think for a four piston caliper, I will use two shims - one from each side to keep a uniform thickness. Just tap 'em together till they're thicker than the rotor.

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set the valves on my hopped up 2004 v11 cafe sport to .002 -.003.

found additional midrange and top end!

installed re-usable silcon gaskets and used new stainless hardware.

 

also dropped(!) my 2003 ev11 touring in the driveway thnx to the spectacular design of the kickstand... i helped a little :).

it was a slow drop on the LH side, bent clutch lever and cracked the fairing lower, some small scratches on the LH saddlebag.

 

new lever ordered from MGCYCLE

new fairing lowers ordered from HARPER MOTO

 

oh well, could have been worse!!

 

happy new year...

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