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plexiform

Oil on engine case....?cylinder head gasket replacement

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Sound like success. But you won't know for sure till you give it a proper flogging. Grover Beach to Taft via 58 and back via 166 should do it.

 

  :race:

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Sound like success. But you won't know for sure till you give it a proper flogging. Grover Beach to Taft via 58 and back via 166 should do it.

 

  :race:

 Or heck jump on Interstate 10 east to Florida and check out the Keys and ride back. :)

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I have a similar ailment on my 01 V11 greeny. The popping (leaning out I think) due to a head gasket leak as evidenced by carbon staining left side at the head gasket. I’m trying to find via internet procedure for pulling the head. Or can’t be that difficult. It’s a mud pump after all! Lol

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18 minutes ago, Seth said:

I have a similar ailment on my 01 V11 greeny. The popping (leaning out I think) due to a head gasket leak as evidenced by carbon staining left side at the head gasket. I’m trying to find via internet procedure for pulling the head. Or can’t be that difficult. It’s a mud pump after all! Lol

Highly unlikely. Personally I'd be doing a simple compression test before I got into a head removal.

Ciao 

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42 minutes ago, Seth said:

I have a similar ailment on my 01 V11 greeny. The popping (leaning out I think) due to a head gasket leak as evidenced by carbon staining left side at the head gasket. I’m trying to find via internet procedure for pulling the head. Or can’t be that difficult. It’s a mud pump after all! Lol

Looking something like this, Seth?

DSCN1795.JPG

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9 minutes ago, po18guy said:

Those are perfect for the timing sensor that was leaking on the original poster's (plexiform's) V11 back in 2016, but that may not be what Seth has. The image I posted above shows a leak that had me thinking head gasket for a long time, but it is an O-ring inside the valve cover under a plug (that I can't get out) . . .

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2 minutes ago, docc said:

Those are perfect for the timing sensor that was leaking on the original poster's (plexiform's) V11 back in 2016, but that may not be what Seth has. The image I posted above shows a leak that had me thinking head gasket for a long time, but it is an O-ring inside the valve cover under a plug (that I can't get out) . . .

You know docc I wouldn't use those ebay ones or any Buna-N or Nitrile o-rings anymore unless I was desperate. The Viton or FKM are the only way to go I think. Buna and Nitrile have an upper temp limit of 100deg C and even the crankcase oil can easily achieve that under the right conditions. Viton and FKM are around 240 dec C from memory and are fuel proof as well. Some of the Guzzi orings that have been superseded have been done so because they have been changed to Viton. 

Thats why the Nitrile o-ring leak with age because they are operating up to and over their upper temp limit and they harden.

Ciao 

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Here is a nifty chart listing the strengths and weaknesses of the various compositions of O-rings. 

https://www.globaloring.com/o-ring-materials-comparison-chart/

Located in Texas, they claim to have 50 million O-rings in stock - except for Guzzi sizes.  OK,  just guessing there...

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1 hour ago, po18guy said:

Here is a nifty chart listing the strengths and weaknesses of the various compositions of O-rings. 

https://www.globaloring.com/o-ring-materials-comparison-chart/

Located in Texas, they claim to have 50 million O-rings in stock - except for Guzzi sizes.  OK,  just guessing there...

Yep, not bad. I've looked at a dozen or more of these charts over the last few months and whats frustrating is they can vary wildly in their application criterion. I was primarily looking at Petrol compatibility and as this chart shows FKM is very good but I've seen charts that says Nitrile is good with petrol which it isn't in my experience. It's acceptable in fuel for a captured joint with no relative movement where the significant swelling can work to improve the seal but if you want a seal that wont swell in fuel you need FKM.

An example. The link you sent indicates Nitrile is "poor" for gasoline but if you go to their complete compatibility guide it's rated as a "1" "satisfactory" ! 

There are so many seal material compositions that it gets complicated and identifying what a seal is actually made from can be next to impossible if it's not labeled.

Viton/FKM all the way for me, you can't go wrong in the majority of applications.

We actually had a major issue with Leading Edge slat actuators leaking on 737's a few years ago. They changed the seal material and the new material wasn't as good at low temps. On a flight of around 3-4 hrs of cruize@ 42,000' when the actuators had cold soaked they used to leak everywhere to the extent the passengers could see a trail of skydrol coming off the trailing edge of the wing. Shorter flights were ok and once it landed the seals in the actuators had warmed up again and stopped leaking. Even the designers get it wrong sometimes.

Ciao     

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I have an assortment of the green "high pressure" O-rings for car/truck HVAC use. They appear to be viton - rather higher durometer than the usual nitrile - so would be appropriate for Guzzi crank sensors and that kind of stuff. 390º was their designated limit for that material.

Boeing experience you say? I was in tooling in the 70s until I found a steady job in the government :rolleyes: Dad spent 38 years there, ending up in Experimental and Test (B-3410 for any Boeing types) in a small building adjacent to the runway. He enjoyed the heck out of it, as the shop was a microcosm of the manufacturing process, with early CNC, heat treat furnace, autoclave, A&P welders etc. He told me stories of the various times he had to demonstrate to certain engineers that two objects cannot occupy the same physical space.

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17 minutes ago, po18guy said:

I have an assortment of the green "high pressure" O-rings for car/truck HVAC use. They appear to be viton - rather higher durometer than the usual nitrile - so would be appropriate for Guzzi crank sensors and that kind of stuff. 390º was their designated limit for that material.

Boeing experience you say? I was in tooling in the 70s until I found a steady job in the government :rolleyes: Dad spent 38 years there, ending up in Experimental and Test (B-3410 for any Boeing types) in a small building adjacent to the runway. He enjoyed the heck out of it, as the shop was a microcosm of the manufacturing process, with early CNC, heat treat furnace, autoclave, A&P welders etc. He told me stories of the various times he had to demonstrate to certain engineers that two objects cannot occupy the same physical space.

Ha, yes I've had a few interesting discussions with Boeing "We didn't think of that solution so it can't be right" design engineers a few times. 

Ciao

 

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Seth , the leaking o-ring(s) can be accessed after removing the rocker arm assy . Look at a parts diagram and see what you need . When I repaired mine , I just used OEM stuff . 

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On 7/10/2020 at 4:29 AM, gstallons said:

Seth , the leaking o-ring(s) can be accessed after removing the rocker arm assy . Look at a parts diagram and see what you need . When I repaired mine , I just used OEM stuff . 

I had always heard the rockers had to come out, but my last attempt to pull that plug, I found it accessible above (inboard of) the rocker shaft. :huh2:

(I just could not get the thing to budge.)

There are a couple other oil leak points that make it look like a head gasket (but isn't), so we'll see what Seth finds when he checks back in . . .

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I think you just remove the assembly ? This was some X ago . 

It can't be too difficult , I did it . Look at your parts diagrams then order the o-rings & superbad valve cover gaskets .  MG Cycle is supposed to be the vendor for these . Get the o-rings from them too . Adjust the valves to taste and have fun ! Trust me 0.002'' isn't going to throw the Earth off it's axis . 

Edited by gstallons
Not enough info
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