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footgoose

New part for shift linkage?

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FWIW, aircraft nuts are  "nyloc." There is also a "high temp" lock nut that is used firewall forward and on brakes, etc. I would say that a high temp nut would be better in this application, but not knowing how hot the transmission gets, that would only be throwing a dart.  :huh2:

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Would you put a piece or rubber hose or something over the spring to keep it from possibly vibrating and fatiguing? I've seen that a lot on sidestand and other springs. 

 

I thought about placing a pair of rare earth magnet(s) opposing each other, one on the lever and one on a bracket on the cover, to give a little push to the lever if the spring ever breaks. Haven't engineered placement or brackets yet but I think it would work to get the bike home if the spring broke. If it really worked you might not even realize the spring was gone.

 

Just an idea for now. If I ever do it I will post some pics in case anyone is interested,

 

Magnets! That wouldn't have occurred to me. But then, the extension spring didn't occur to me either. With the oem spring, there is quite a bit of pressure pushing the arm into where it needs to be. If I pursued another alternative to oem, I think I would look into another (better) torsion spring, something like these...https://www.mcmaster.com/#torsion-springs/=18qqre6

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Why didn't you use metric hardware?

 

the prototype kit was assembled from on hand parts. I only own sae taps.

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Why didn't you use metric hardware?

the prototype kit was assembled from on hand parts. I only own sae taps.

$10 tap set from HF will work fine for this kind of stuff.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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$10 tap from an industrial supplier will work fine for this kind of stuff. 

FTFY   :)

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I don't see anything broken!?! what's wrong with sae in a never seen spot, presumably never to service? fairly insignificant bolt usage here. jeesh, gimme a break here :bbblll: 

 I promise, my license plate bolts are metric. :rolleyes:

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You know.. I understand exactly what you are saying. After 50 some years in the trade, I have about every 'Merican drill, tap, reamer, etc. known to man. I think in 'Merican standards and convert it to that sissy metric stuff. B)  Newton meters?? c'mon. Gimme Ft lbs and inch lbs. :huh2:  I still have very few metric tools. Just the same, I do metric on Guzzis just because..  :rasta:

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I don't see anything broken!?! what's wrong with sae in a never seen spot, presumably never to service? fairly insignificant bolt usage here. jeesh, gimme a break here :bbblll:

 I promise, my license plate bolts are metric. :rolleyes:

 

You can use anything you want. You'll most likely be long gone before the next time someone is in that tranny. Still won't me they won't curse you. :ninja:

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FWIW, aircraft nuts are  "nyloc." There is also a "high temp" lock nut that is used firewall forward and on brakes, etc. I would say that a high temp nut would be better in this application, but not knowing how hot the transmission gets, that would only be throwing a dart.  :huh2:

I'd be more concered Chuck with how the nylon would react to transmission fluid over time.

 

Ciao

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I think the nylon will be OK with the fluid in the transmission . There are nylon parts in automatic & manual transmissions of vehicles .

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FWIW, aircraft nuts are  "nyloc." There is also a "high temp" lock nut that is used firewall forward and on brakes, etc. I would say that a high temp nut would be better in this application, but not knowing how hot the transmission gets, that would only be throwing a dart.  :huh2:

 

I'd be more concered Chuck with how the nylon would react to transmission fluid over time.

 

Ciao

I use them in many applications. Zero issues with oil or transmission fluids.

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FWIW, aircraft nuts are  "nyloc." There is also a "high temp" lock nut that is used firewall forward and on brakes, etc. I would say that a high temp nut would be better in this application, but not knowing how hot the transmission gets, that would only be throwing a dart.  :huh2:

I'd be more concered Chuck with how the nylon would react to transmission fluid over time.

 

Ciao

I use them in many applications. Zero issues with oil or transmission fluids.

Ok, was just thinking about those guzzi boxes that had plastic bearing cages that didn't tolerate gearbox lube and would fail. People updated them to metal cages from memory.

 

Ciao

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I'm trying to find info on what model year the factory upgraded the pawl spring.  I've searched a bunch of different topics, but cannot find the info - I could have sworn that i read years ago that by 2004 the factory was installing upgraded pawl springs.  Am i making that up?  

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