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Zorro

RAM low inertia clutch

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Hi guys,

 

Just picked up my 04' V11 Nero Corsa after installing a RAM low inertia clutch from my dear friend and trusted mechanic Kenny Austin here in Calgary. All I can say is I'm blown away at the improvement in the way the bike shifts, accelerates, and tips from side to side into the corners due to less rotating mass. I will definitely have one installed on my 2000 V11 Sport this winter, or sooner! Absolutely no downsides to speak of. The bike feels like it's gained a few horsepower because of the way the engine is able to rev now. Still has all the character of a Guzzi but somehow feels thoroughly modern at the same time. Clutch pull effort has somehow also been reduced. I highly recommend installing one.

 

Cheers,

 

Francesco

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Was that RAM kit for 6-speed, including the input hub, or did you have to use a modified 5-speed kit? I'm asking because the 6-speed kits are no longer available from RAM (unless something changed recently that I am not aware of).

 

My Scura has a new RAM clutch and I agree with your assessment, although you describe a greater degree of difference than I notice between it an my LeMans with the standard clutch.

 

But I agree that the clutch pull effort is way lighter. The RAM uses sort of a flat spring, but the standard uses 10 coil springs.

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Zorro,

 

Please can you share the link of the RAM low inertia clutch that you installed?

 

THANKs and best regards,

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I am very curious about this subject. How does the RAM clutch compare to this flywheel offered by MGC: http://www.mgcycle.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=193&products_id=4409

 

They also offer "lighweight" kevlar clutch plates that are compatible with this flywheel and most twin plate V11's: http://www.mgcycle.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=193&products_id=4749

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I am very curious about this subject. How does the RAM clutch compare to this flywheel offered by MGC: http://www.mgcycle.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=193&products_id=4409

 

They also offer "lighweight" kevlar clutch plates that are compatible with this flywheel and most twin plate V11's: http://www.mgcycle.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=193&products_id=4749

 

That's a lightweight version of the twin-plate flywheel. RAM is totally different. Here's a thread on it:

 

http://www.v11lemans.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=19510

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Hi again

 

Unfortunately I received the RAM for my V11 from a guy who bought it a couple of years ago and never installed it in his own bike for some reason. I wasn't aware they were no longer available. Guzzibits out of England might have them still. I know my particular unit was a dedicated 6 speed unit and came assembled. I hope they haven't been discontinued as I want to install one on my 2000 V11 Sport. MG Cycle no longer offers them. I checked today............

 

Cheers

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Hey Scud, thanks for the link, I've already been on that thread and still don't really understand the difference, and specifically what makes the RAM product special and different from a lightened flywheel/clutch plate package. What's the remedial version? I was under the impression that it all came down to weight reduction of the spinning parts.

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Hey Scud, thanks for the link, I've already been on that thread and still don't really understand the difference, and specifically what makes the RAM product special and different from a lightened flywheel/clutch plate package. What's the remedial version? I was under the impression that it all came down to weight reduction of the spinning parts.

 

http://www.v11lemans.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=19510&p=211537

 

The diaphragm spring is especially nice. Properly set up it can be a one finger lever.

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I think the performance differences have been covered. So here's the basic mechanical difference.

 

The two systems are totally different. There is no compatible part between the crankshaft and the transmission.

 

RAM:  

  1. steel flywheel with no friction surfaces or teeth - flywheel will theoretically last forever
  2. one friction disc
  3. mass is more centalized, so less inertia
  4. springs are part of the pressure plate
  5. requires a special transmission input hub

Lightened aluminum flywheel

  1. this is the same shape and function as the stock flywheel
  2. all the clutch parts go into the flywheel (2 friction discs, intermediate plate, 10 coil springs)

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Scud: Steel Flywheel???

 

Yup. Magnets stick it. I guess they switched to steel at some point. The flywheel is now smaller, with 3 prongs instead of the full circle aluminum flywheel. So while the steel is a touch heavier than the aluminum, it is stronger and the mass is all closer to the center.

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Hmmm. So aside from longer lasting steel flywheel and easier clutch operation, it would be on par with the conventional lightened one from a performance standpoint? Lower weight results in lower inertia, one way or another methinks, or am I still missing something?

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I think that the weight is one part of it - the lighter it is the more free-revving. But the location of the weight is also important. The closer the weight is to the center the faster is can spin. Like a figure skater spinning faster when she brings her arms in. By design, the twin plate clutch and flywheel has a lot of weight on the outside.

 

Then you need to consider the mechanical connections of the parts. I think that having one plate contributes to a quicker, crisper, engagement - vs a twin plate. The twin plate has twice as many friction surfaces that all need to come together before power is sent to the transmission.

 

I think the single plate clutch pull is easier because leverage is applied to the flat springs by the internal mechanisms. That leverage translates into less effort at the lever. With the twin-plate, your only leverage is the hand lever - the force you apply compresses 10 coil springs in straight line. Obviously, the hydraulic system is also a form of leverage, but both clutches use the same hydraulics so I am ignoring that.

 

And to clarify for Baldini - the steel RAM flywheel was only available in aftermarket kits. All the single-plate V11s were originally supplied with aluminum flywheels.

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I will confirm that the clutch lever pull is indeed a one finger operation with the RAM. I've ridden about 3000 KMS on the RAM system on my Nero Corsa and I truly love it. The handling from left to right transitions in particular is awesome because of the less inertia affecting the chassis.

 

Cheers

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I will confirm that the clutch lever pull is indeed a one finger operation with the RAM. I've ridden about 3000 KMS on the RAM system on my Nero Corsa and I truly love it. The handling from left to right transitions in particular is awesome because of the less inertia affecting the chassis.

 

Cheers

This RAM system includes a flywheel?

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