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Battery light flicker


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Well, my-my.  Just lately, I've noticed my Battery (Charge) Warning Light flickering dimly at idle. The charge voltage at the added Accessory Jack is about 13.2 at idle and 14.2 above 2000 rpm. The charge voltage tops out at 14.35v and the light goes out. Below that is a very dim flicker.

 

Just enough to give me the heebie-jeebies. :wacko:

 

Later V11 do not have this Battery Warning Light, having both left and right turn signal indicators instead.

 

So, some kind of voltage drop to across the headstock into the dash? Flinky bulb holder?

 

Smokin' ground fault? :rasta::o

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You mean your's actually works? I think mine is activated by phases of the moon.

Docc said "So it can be said that when the battery is fully charged the charging Voltage is the same but the regulator is allowing less current through" Not exactly, it wont let anything through unti

I would put an amount of electrical grease in the cavities before plugging it up for a perfect connection .

You mean your's actually works? I think mine is activated by phases of the moon.

That could be it!

 

See, it worries me that the inside of my high-zoot, aircraft grade 30 amp charging circuit breaker could use a spritz of Caig DeOxit.  It's one f the few points that has not been *treated*.

 

What triggers that light? The regulator itself?

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The regulator triggers the light, but I can't describe how it knows when to do so.

 

I'm sure someone here can.

Yeah, yeah. Gonna have to take up a collection and send Kiwi_Roy another v11 . . . :grin:

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I have such a modified electrical system, I don't know if what I have going on will be helpful.

 

But, I could use some guidance understanding why the light flickers while the voltages look good.

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I probably wouldn't worry if your voltages are what they are. That's what counts.

 

I did finally put one of these voltage monitors on my bike, it works really well. You could get one and take out your charge bulb. B)

 

http://www.sparkbright.co.uk/sparkright-eclipse-battery-voltage-monitor.php

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I probably wouldn't worry if your voltages are what they are. That's what counts.

 

I did finally put one of these voltage monitors on my bike, it works really well. You could get one and take out your charge bulb. B)

 

http://www.sparkbright.co.uk/sparkright-eclipse-battery-voltage-monitor.php

Yeah, I wish that product had voltage parameters for the AGM (those voltage breaks are fine for a flooded lead-acid battery). 13.2vDC just doesn't cut it.

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Actually, it looks like my "Warning Light" is telling me the truth already!

 

The AGM only actually charges above 14.2 vDC . . .

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I think you are fine. A lot of bikes with AGM batteries top out at 14 to 14.3v charge voltage. Some charge as high as 14.5 or 14.6v.

 

Was your battery FULLY charged when you saw the 14.2v? If not, it can take a while at rpm to top off the battery and the charging voltage to reach its max, i.e actually riding. I've seen mine take 15+ minutes at 65mph to top out at 14.3 or so.

 

If you can, hook up the voltmeter and go for a highway speed ride.

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Yep, I keep my AGM "pre-conditioned." 

 

The dim warning light is new.

 

While the battery seems fine, I wonder what has changed to flicker this light at idle.

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I probably wouldn't worry if your voltages are what they are. That's what counts.

 

I did finally put one of these voltage monitors on my bike, it works really well. You could get one and take out your charge bulb. B)

 

http://www.sparkbright.co.uk/sparkright-eclipse-battery-voltage-monitor.php

Yeah, I wish that product had voltage parameters for the AGM (those voltage breaks are fine for a flooded lead-acid battery). 13.2vDC just doesn't cut it.

 

 

I look at it as a charging failure indicator, not so much as an indicator of max charge voltage.

 

If the system starts to get weak or just quits and voltage drops below 13.2, I will still have some capacity left in the battery. That might give me a chance to pull some lighting fuses and make it home, or at least get closer to home. 

 

Or if I'm running heated gear and it's too much for the system I will get a warning before the battery is too low to start the bike.

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I probably wouldn't worry if your voltages are what they are. That's what counts.

 

I did finally put one of these voltage monitors on my bike, it works really well. You could get one and take out your charge bulb. B)

 

http://www.sparkbright.co.uk/sparkright-eclipse-battery-voltage-monitor.php

Yeah, I wish that product had voltage parameters for the AGM (those voltage breaks are fine for a flooded lead-acid battery). 13.2vDC just doesn't cut it.

 

 

I look at it as a charging failure indicator, not so much as an indicator of max charge voltage.

 

If the system starts to get weak or just quits and voltage drops below 13.2, I will still have some capacity left in the battery. That might give me a chance to pull some lighting fuses and make it home, or at least get closer to home. 

 

Or if I'm running heated gear and it's too much for the system I will get a warning before the battery is too low to start the bike.

 

Hm . . . interesting. We're coming into heated gear season here. I'll have to plug in the 77 watt jacket and see what the flicker flicks!

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The label on these batteries say "float charge 13.8V". I'd stick to this value. More IMHO just means stress and induced ageing for the battery as well as for the other electrical components.

 

A flickering light could indicate a dying regulator, unless the light is switched to ground. Then it would indicate a beginning shortage somewhere between light and regulator. That's no problem - if only this one single cable is damaged.

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