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IOM Le Mans back from Daytona


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Again sorry for taking so long to reply to the forum. 

 

I was going over the oiling problems and the comments about same plus those regarding positive/negative issue etc. 

 

I began my racing working on a type of race car called a Formula Junior.  These engines tended to pump oil out at a alarming rate.  When I began seeing this problem starting to begin in the Guzzi I tackled it in the same way we did the F Juniors.  "KISS' we first tried to release the crankcase pressure with venting. As oil will escape through said venting  we created small inline catch tanks in the form of small in line fuel filters (the kind that have replaceable internal filters) filling them with oil trapping foam.  These "catch tanks" return the oil to the sump through a drain back system.

 

Our problem was pumping oil out on to the track and our tires.  At miller (UMC) we ran the Guzzi harder than we have ever done and with no visible oil loss, no oil misting or volume loss.  Total cost of the new system was under $100.  The system was by no means elegant but it was simple, cheap and functional.

 

At the risk of over simplifying things 50 years of racing have imprinted one fact in my mind first fix the problem then make the fix sexy.

 

I thank you all for the input as it has given me a plethora of ideas for the future.  As the one thing that is as nearly as hard to find as money is time my simple fix will need to do until we return from down under.

 

Thanks again for the information .

Cheers

Richard 

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The subject of crankcase pressure has the same voodoo about it as balancing v-twins, quench clearances, and oxygenated fuels.  Every engine design is different, so each requires a particular vent lay

You can see the effect of the reed valve on my Norton. On this model there is a vent off the back of the crankcase, then a very short hose, reed valve and then a long hose back to the oil tank. I dril

Its  a drain back hose from the frame spine. The crankcase breathes into the spine and from there into the airbox. Any oil that accumulates in the spine can drain back into the cases. No check valve i

  • 2 months later...

Time to bring you all up to date on the Moto Guzzi Racer.

 

We last raced the bike at Millers then pulled the plug on our racing so we could get things ready for 2019. 

As some of you may recall the motorbike was build by Ed at Guzzi Power specifically to race in the Manx GP on the IOM.  Because of the distance of those races and the very high speeds we had been using the tallest  gearing  Guzzi makes. 

On shorter courses this was costing us quite a bit in the top end department.  At Millers we raced on a very short course; far shorter than I have ever seen at this track.  It did show us how much we were giving up.  Wade had gotten the jump on the field at the start but as soon as the riders settled in the lack of corner exit speed began to move him toward the rear of the field.  We finished the event and most important we had gone considerably quicker loping of almost 10 sec. over the weekend.

 

Since this event we have spent our time reading the bike "Gina" for her next outing.  Middle of next week she goes into the shipping crate and heads to OZ for the Phillip Island Classic in January so wish us good luck.  I'll will try and keep you updated on the trip and racing.

 

By the way I think we solved the fuel problems we ran into at Miller.  We had entered two races that were back to back.  As time was going to be a wee bit of an issue we had filled the tank top the brim.  What we have found is that our venting was minimal.  This had never presented any problems in the past because we never filled the tank over half way.  This left an air gap that allowed good fuel flow as there was enough venting within the tank to let fuel flow during high use periods.  When the rider backed off the throttle the tank would equalize and off we'd go again.  With the tank filled to brim no air space thus to venting.  We were just starving the engine.  We have now fixed the problem by allowing the tank to vent better.

 

Someone on the list had asked where we were dynoing our engines I think he was asking about the altitude of our dyno shop.  This engine was done at Wheelsmith's Factory Racing shop in Marin county which is at sea level.  I have done dyno work at my old place in Colorado it's just something one needs to adjust for.  I hope this answers the question and sorry it took so long to do so.

 

Pass ya on the inside !

 

Rich

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Time to bring you all up to date on the Moto Guzzi Racer.

 

We last raced the bike at Millers then pulled the plug on our racing so we could get things ready for 2019. 

As some of you may recall the motorbike was build by Ed at Guzzi Power specifically to race in the Manx GP on the IOM.  Because of the distance of those races and the very high speeds we had been using the tallest  gearing  Guzzi makes. 

On shorter courses this was costing us quite a bit in the top end department.  At Millers we raced on a very short course; far shorter than I have ever seen at this track.  It did show us how much we were giving up.  Wade had gotten the jump on the field at the start but as soon as the riders settled in the lack of corner exit speed began to move him toward the rear of the field.  We finished the event and most important we had gone considerably quicker loping of almost 10 sec. over the weekend.

 

Since this event we have spent our time reading the bike "Gina" for her next outing.  Middle of next week she goes into the shipping crate and heads to OZ for the Phillip Island Classic in January so wish us good luck.  I'll will try and keep you updated on the trip and racing.

 

By the way I think we solved the fuel problems we ran into at Miller.  We had entered two races that were back to back.  As time was going to be a wee bit of an issue we had filled the tank top the brim.  What we have found is that our venting was minimal.  This had never presented any problems in the past because we never filled the tank over half way.  This left an air gap that allowed good fuel flow as there was enough venting within the tank to let fuel flow during high use periods.  When the rider backed off the throttle the tank would equalize and off we'd go again.  With the tank filled to brim no air space thus to venting.  We were just starving the engine.  We have now fixed the problem by allowing the tank to vent better.

 

Someone on the list had asked where we were dynoing our engines I think he was asking about the altitude of our dyno shop.  This engine was done at Wheelsmith's Factory Racing shop in Marin county which is at sea level.  I have done dyno work at my old place in Colorado it's just something one needs to adjust for.  I hope this answers the question and sorry it took so long to do so.

 

Pass ya on the inside !

 

Rich

Looks like I'll be seeing you at PI then. Let me know if you need anything. I live about 1hr 45 away from the track.

 

Ciao

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Hi Phil,

 

Good to hear from you.  Here in the states we're known as the Purple Gang.  Being that the bike is purple and all.  Name of my race company is Sportcraft.  Do come and find us and say hello

 

And Ciao back at ya,

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