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antmanbee

Replacing my Blown V11 Engine - Have a few questions

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I purchased this low mileage 2003 bike with a blown engine back in May and got a good V11 engine during the summer. I am finally getting around to doing the swap. 

I have crabbed Tontis several times but I am new to spines. From reading some old threads it looks like dropping only the engine out the front will probably be my course of action. 

I have chocked the front wheel and will attach some straps from the ceiling beams to the rear to stabilize it. 

In other old threads there were pictures of the front wheel off during engine removal. Will this be necessary?

With only 5800 miles on the bike I don't anticipate needing to replace and clutch parts. I will be using the original flywheel also. Do the flywheel bolts need to be replaced or can they be reused?

Any tips on R&R the engine?

 

Most importantly, since there was a lot of metal debris in the old engine due to the failed rod bearings, I was planning on flushing the oil cooler and lines thoroughly but will this be enough? I don't know if any metal debris got in there but if it did will a thorough cleaning get it all out?

 

Any suggestions on additional things to do while the engine is out? Overall the bike looks in excellent shape but has not been run for a decade. I got new tires waiting to be put on after its running. Anything you would replace or always do when the engine comes out no matter how low of miles or how good it looks?

 

Thanks

 

IMG_1108.JPG

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Wow, bud! Lots of good questions . . .

 

While you have access to the back of the motor and the front of the gearbox, it is a good time to address the (eight!) common leak points. You may not want to mess with them all, but a few common ones are easy:

IMG_2704.JPG

 

Remove the bottom two main bearing carrier bolts, clean the threads and install with a quality thread sealant. Seal the "cam bung" at the top center with a quality epoxy like JB Weld. Replace the paper gasket under the crankcase vent (top right, above).  That's four!

 

The crank main seal can be replaced, but may be best done by pulling the carried which helps to have The Special Tool (I built one). There is a paper gasket under that bearing carrier. That's six!

 

There are two on the gearbox. One is the input shaft seal. The other is a seal for the clutch actuation rod.

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As long as you have a steel, twin plate, flywheel it will be fine. Only the aluminum flywheels are suspect. But, yes, new fasteners are a good idea in that application. A tool to lock up the rotation to get full and proper torque, as well.

 

Be certain to inspect the retention (safety) washer that locks the input hub to the gearbox. I had one come from together from the factory installation:

 

Clutch Service/ Input Hub Inspection

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I have always had success with Loctite 515 gasket maker .You do not need a gasket and it replaces the gasket . Perfect preparation gets perfect results .   

Mark the oil seal housing before removal so it will go back on the same way it came off .As for the crank seal , leave the old seal in the oil seal housing and try sliding/installing the housing onto the rear of the engine .Use a small paper clip unfolded to where there is only one loop . Use this to help work the seal over the end of the  c/shaft . When you get good and feel confident , install the new seal into the housing 

.Clean everything and get ready ! Use a seal installer or a good substitute to make sure the seal is installed square and flat .515 [ not too much , just enough ] on the mating surface , lightly oil the seal / c/shaft seal surface and install . IDK if this plate has a dowel pin for alignment .  

 I use to use liquid Teflon sealer on small block Chevy head bolts since the threaded holes went directly into the coolant . I would use a USB ( shouldered ) bolt instead of the factory fastener . 

Good luck . 

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Thanks Docc,

As far as I know it has the steel twin plate, although I have not yet inspected it. The Sport Nakeds were not supposed to have the aluminum flywheel.

I guess I will do the 2 bottom rear bearing housing bolts, the epoxy and the breather tube gasket and maybe the clutch actuating rod seal.

 

Any thoughts about the oil cooler?

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gstallons,

 

I don't think I will remove and replace the the gasket and seal on the rear main crankshaft bearing. Do you have a link to the USB bolts that you recommend?

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Thanks Docc,

Any thoughts about the oil cooler?

 

Not possible to have it too clean. But one particle in the wrong place can be deadly. I'd take off the oil cooler and clean the crap out of it. Anywhere that oil has been should be suspect.

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I would replace the flywheel bolts every time.

 

You can get the engine out without removing the front wheel, but it's kind of a tight fit. I have had good luck with the engine on a platform jack that I can slide on the garage floor.

 

You might use new springs for the clutch. Alternate the stock springs with some stiffer springs. The guys at MG Cycle can tell you all about the springs - and supply you with new hardware for the flywheel while you're at it.

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gstallons,

 

I don't think I will remove and replace the the gasket and seal on the rear main crankshaft bearing. Do you have a link to the USB bolts that you recommend?

I am sorry. I meant UBS not USB . The UBS fasteners have a flange made into them . 

Just remove one and get the same length , size etc . at a japanese m/cycle or car dealership . The only difference will be the head size .e.g. an 8mm ( Japanese/Asian )  bolt will have a 12mm head and others will have a 13mm head. IDK if Fastenal stocks them .I hate buying 20 min AND PAYING FRIEGHT. Does anyone know the size & I will see if I have some ?

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So with the UBS bolts and Teflon sealer on the threads it is sufficiently sealed? No sealing washer is necessary?

 

It looks like a not too complicated job to drop the engine and I am hoping I don't get stuck with needing some unobtainable item that I can't get during my window of opportunity to fix this thing over the holidays.

Like flywheel bolts, special sealers, gaskets etc.

Any other recommended thread sealer alternatives besides the liquid Teflon?

 

Is there a reason to be suspicious of the pressure plate springs? I plan on inspecting the flywheel clutch assembly thoroughly but I don't anticipate needing anything with only 5800 miles on it.

 

Is this the clutch rod seal that is being referred to? Is the seal 8mm ID x 16mm OD x 7mm thick?

http://www.mgcycle.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=79_225&products_id=2331&zenid=a1ea9670daad9e77aa1ccc4452a9440f

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Yep, that is the pushrod seal, GU90400816.

 

The only two bolts that go through to the crankcase are the bottom two. Pretty sure I used Teflon pipe thread sealing tape (that detail may be in the thread I linked "Bell Housing Leak". 

 

I replaced my clutch springs with OEM pieces that came from the no-longer-in-existance Moto International. Even with over 100,000 miles, they were not collapsed.  If there have been any oil leaks inside the bell housing, inspect the friction discs and clean all the friction surfaces.

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Is there a reason to be suspicious of the pressure plate springs? 

 

Not really. They will probably be fine. I liked the stiffer clutch with the alternating springs. It's just a thing to think about while you're there - not really a problem in any way. I did find that one clutch I replaced due to slipping had a lot of wear left on the plates - and stiffer springs would have made those plates last longer.

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This would also be a good chance to inspect and perhaps replace the crankcase breather hose that goes from that crooked tube on the backside of the motor to the front underside of the spine frame.

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I was only replacing the clutch flywheel assembly but I removed the motor. A bit daunting for a first timer, but seemed a lot easier when finished..lol. Positioned on the floor, front wheel chocked, fear subframe suspended from a rafter and with ratchet straps. A modified auto floor jack under the motor, and when ready, I ratcheted the rear up about 6-8" off the floor to get it out the right side, crabbing slightly. The front subframe was pivoted forward on the front bolts after removal of the 2 rear ones (thanks for that advise Scud) this allowed the motor to disengage/engage the tranny. . The other (advisable) and totally rookie thing I did was kept a notepad listing every step of disassembly, and reversed it for assembly. It worked! nothing left over.

 

Motor balanced and rolled around pretty easy on this

 

jack.JPG

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