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Lucky Phil

V11 Daytona project

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Looking at some old images I keep thinking how worth the effort it was painting those side plates. I've also been spending time addressing a lot of cosmetic stuff thats accessible with everything apart. 

Here's what the side plates used to look like.

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Ciao

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See? See, there? Even the true pros have a hammer well at hand! :luigi:

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1 minute ago, docc said:

See? See, there? Even the true pros have a hammer well at hand! :luigi:

Ha yes docc had that one for a long time. I often reflect on the tools I've owned for extended periods, a lot for more than 45 years. Then there are tools inherited from my grandfather who was an aircraft engineer also and died in the early 60's when I was around 6 years old. I have images of helping him working on his Triumph Herald ( horrid little car) by handing him some of those very same tools I now own. I got quite upset a year ago or so when I was convinced I had lost my 1/4 drive Snap-on ratchet which I bought as a 2nd year apprentice 43 years ago and cost me half a weeks wage. Wandered around for an hour kicking myself and acting like a death in the family had occurred. Then I found it...........in my side pocket, doh (I so rarely put tools in my pocket). But then I got the chance to rejoice and the stupid feeling subsided.

Old tools are like old friends that you have shared times with.

Ciao 

 

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58 minutes ago, Lucky Phil said:

Ha yes docc had that one for a long time. I often reflect on the tools I've owned for extended periods, a lot for more than 45 years. Then there are tools inherited from my grandfather who was an aircraft engineer also and died in the early 60's when I was around 6 years old. I have images of helping him working on his Triumph Herald ( horrid little car) by handing him some of those very same tools I now own. I got quite upset a year ago or so when I was convinced I had lost my 1/4 drive Snap-on ratchet which I bought as a 2nd year apprentice 43 years ago and cost me half a weeks wage. Wandered around for an hour kicking myself and acting like a death in the family had occurred. Then I found it...........in my side pocket, doh (I so rarely put tools in my pocket). But then I got the chance to rejoice and the stupid feeling subsided.

Old tools are like old friends that you have shared times with.

Ciao 

 

That is so dear. And so kindly to share. :sun:

:luigi:  "Old tools are like old friends that you have shared times with."  :oldgit:

[edit: I so had to add that quote, properly attributed to LuckyPhil, to my profile "About Me." That is so well said, and so resonates with what I feel we are about here. Thanks  :notworthy: Phil!]

 

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I'll add to that sentiment and know exactly what you mean Phil - my late father was a master carpenter (also in the aircraft industry) - served his apprenticeship in the model shop where back in the day they would make scale models for testing in the wind-tunnel ... so I inherited his wood-working tool chest. Not as useful for mechanical stuff of course, but always brings back fond memories when using some of those old tools ... as I still do fairly regularly.

Keep up the good work mate - a lot of us have been following this project with both admiration and yes, anticipation ..!

 

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8 hours ago, Gio said:

I'll add to that sentiment and know exactly what you mean Phil - my late father was a master carpenter (also in the aircraft industry) - served his apprenticeship in the model shop where back in the day they would make scale models for testing in the wind-tunnel ... so I inherited his wood-working tool chest. Not as useful for mechanical stuff of course, but always brings back fond memories when using some of those old tools ... as I still do fairly regularly.

Keep up the good work mate - a lot of us have been following this project with both admiration and yes, anticipation ..!

 

Interesting, we had a very nice old guy working for us on the tarmac as a cleaner back in the 80's and he used to make those lovely sleek display models of all sorts of aircraft. Qantas and TAA used to commission him to make models of our jets for display in the terminals and executive offices etc. All hand made wood, really nice.

Ciao 

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So I thought I'd have a play around with the throttle bodies and TPS sensor and also confirm my wiring for the PF09 TPS was correct when fitting the old style plug to the V11 loom as the colour coding is different. I made up a 5V power supply and some flying leads and confirmed the TPS read outs were correct and thought i'd do a preliminary set of the TPS which I can confirm when I power up the system on the ecu. bearing in mind that I have no idea how this engine ran or the mileage originally the TPS condition could be anything and I want to eliminate as many variables as possible. mechanically the Throttle bodies are acceptable from a wear perspective although I replaced the plastic connector rod ball assembly.

Unfortunately I couldnt get the TPS reading below around 200MV unless I tapped it with a screw drive handle and then I could get it to around 140MV with the throttle blade completely closed which would work if evertime you stopped you tapped the TPS. I ran out of TPS adjustment so I decided to see if I could pull it apart and see what was happening. Although this isnt really relevant to the V11 as it uses the later TPS it might be to anyone following in my footsteps down the track.

The PF09 TPS is held together with small metal press rivets so I used a box cutter blade into the joining line and gently twisted the blade to get the rivets to release. Going from one side to the other slowly slowly until I could get a 0.020" feeler gauge length ways into the gap and use those. It helps if you use one on each side simultaneously to prevent the halves rocking as it separates. The whole process took quite a while like 15 minutes but it came apart without looking like it had been apart, ie not butchered.

This is the process.

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And this is what it looks like apart. Note the crud and rubbish on the wiper fingers and also the foam seal and rivets. Also note the strong return spring and wiper faces.

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Here it is again after cleaning with a very small paint brush and contact cleaner followed by contact cleaner and cotton wool buds. 

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Here you can see the closed stop screw assembly.

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So after cleaning I hooked it up to my 5V supply and checked the operation. Still not able to get it below 190MV but it was stable now. So next step was to adjust the stop screw. Nothing magic here just adjusted it until the reading bottomed out at 14MV and left it there. Not sure why this was the way it was, dont think wear was a factor, maybe it wasnt adjusted properly from the factory. Dont really know.  

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Wide open throttle, 4.76 volts which is the nominal voltage of my power supply. 

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Anyway re assembly is simple just put the halves together and use a small tool to press the securing rivets back in place.I also changed the securing screws over to the Torx type I had off another set of Ducati throttle bodies as my original straight slot fasteners were a bit ropy.

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Ciao

 

 

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So onto the steering stops. My preferred option was to machine off the original lower triple clamp stops and make new adjustable bolt on ones but I simply dont have access to the equipment required these days so I thought long and hard and decided on plan B for the time being at least.

I tapped and drilled a hole in each stop and machines up some Ti spacers combined with button head caps. Drilling and tapping accurately the stops in situ was interesting to say the least but I surprised myself and got it right for a change. I made up a rather crude tiny 5mm thick alloy plate with an accurate hole through it to be my guide and clamped it to the face of each stop and used my die grinder with a drill chucked up to drill the holes as there was limited room for a hand drill. Used the same process to get the tap aligned for the tapping process as well.

Next  job is the top triple clamp off to freshen up the paint where the previous owner used to ride with a key fob flapping about damaging the paint work. Why the hell people ride with key fobs flapping around is beyond me. I've never used such a thing in 50 years of riding.

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Ciao    

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So some progress. I've managed to get the front end back together and finish off the wiring. I painted the top triple clamp and gave everything a good clean up while I was there. I bought myself a stand which I should have done years ago as the one I have was a home made job from the previous owner and very dodgy and dangerous to use. I'm carrying too many old injuries these days to struggle with the physical stuff, when there are sensible options,so I dont.

On its wheels. The braided breather hose is the next job to finish off. The Throttle bodies and TPS are set up but I need to source a fuel canister to make a tuning fuel supply so I can remove the tank and bench it and hook up a small fuel supply. After reworking the TPS and getting that working I bit the bullet and decided to buy a good second hand set of Ducati throttle bodies. So for about 130usd I ended up with a pair of near new side flow injectors,a TPS, a fuel regulator and mounting assembly I'll use on the remote fuel tank, plus a bunch of spare TB parts inc the pivot ball and some spare plastic fuel fittings that are worth around $45usd ea to replace with alloy aftermarket ones if you break one of the originals. I've now also got a single throttle body that I can use to clean side flow injectors which turned out to be quite an issue finding someone to do.        

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Wiring

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Repainted top triple clamp

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Stand....German made!

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Ciao

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lovely and tidy around that frame phil- shame to hide it all away!   transparent tank?

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Soooooo fantastic!  Nice of you to throw in the hammer to cheer my heart. I can't imagine any were needed for such an immaculate project! :luigi:

Soon time to flush out those dark hydraulic fluids . . . ;)

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13 hours ago, docc said:

Soooooo fantastic!  Nice of you to throw in the hammer to cheer my heart. I can't imagine any were needed for such an immaculate project! :luigi:

Soon time to flush out those dark hydraulic fluids . . . ;)

Yes docc just for you:bier:

A few other jobs ticked off today. Got my lower spoiler installed and made up the oil return line. Next job is to make up a remote fuel tank for tuning work.

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Merlin doesn't care about viruses, he's just happy his mummy and daddy are home 24/7

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Ciao

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On 3/24/2020 at 7:27 PM, stewgnu said:

lovely and tidy around that frame phil- shame to hide it all away!   transparent tank?

Make fuel checks easier:)

Ciao

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So I decided to defer the tuning fuel tank job, just a bad time to do it really when you need to ship stuff and fitted up the fuel tank instead to do a leak check. Popped the injector connectors off and did repeated pump primes to pressurise the system and fill the lines. All good except for an externally leaking fuel tap when in the open position. These thing really are a POS. My original one jammed in the open position and this one inexplicably decides to leak from the shaft seal when open. Anyway I got my old one that had jammed open which I had after that event reworked somehow and fitted that. Hopefully it wont repeat the same defect.

I then moved on to fitting the airbox so I could attack the side covers. The side cover fitment really is horrible on these bikes as they eventually crack due to the poor fitment strain. Need to have a think about solving this as I have 1 brand new cover to fit and one reworked one and I dont want them cracking. Couldn't resist fitting the tank and tailpiec to get an idea what its going to look like.

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Ciao

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It looks unbelievably awful you bastard!

Really, it's stunning. I'm awestruck

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