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On 8/9/2021 at 11:19 AM, Voldav said:

Hi

Glad I found this post ! 
This might’ve happened to my V11

can I pls ask -where exactly is the voltage regulator situated on the bike ? Sry if this is a newbie question 

my V11 burnt something out whilst I was trying to fix a brake light fault and I stupidly left the ignition on too long without turning the bike over - so assume the amps added up and fried some part of it ?

i’ve tried changing the fuse and relay - now there doesn’t seem to be any voltage going to the ignition switch ?

Any help/comments grateful

Thanks

David

Hi, David! Welcome to the V11 forum! You're in a great place to work through your needs.

Which year/model V11 do you have? The regulator is found mounted to the front subframe behind the forks, usually between the horns.

Which fuse and which relay did you change?

Relays can be a source of numerous issues with the V11. There are two wiring configurations between the early (1999-2001) and later (2002-2005) V11, so knowing what you have will narrow the search for solutions.

Again, @Voldav, welcome!

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On 8/9/2021 at 11:19 AM, Voldav said:

Hi

Glad I found this post ! 
This might’ve happened to my V11

can I pls ask -where exactly is the voltage regulator situated on the bike ? Sry if this is a newbie question 

my V11 burnt something out whilst I was trying to fix a brake light fault and I stupidly left the ignition on too long without turning the bike over - so assume the amps added up and fried some part of it ?

i’ve tried changing the fuse and relay - now there doesn’t seem to be any voltage going to the ignition switch ?

Any help/comments grateful

Thanks

David

@Voldav, here is a view of an early Sport (2000) with the voltage regulator visible between the (aftermarket) horns. It is the silver box with the cooling fins on top. The regulator, and charging system, can be checked with a voltmeter at the battery. Otherwise, this is more likely a relay, fuse, or switch(ing) issue. AFAIK, a bad regulator won't stop current to the Ignition Switch.

IMG_7545.jpg

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Hi @Voldav

I don't own a V11 but looking at an early wiring diagram to see if I can help (a little), with 8 fuses in the fusebox. The wiring changed a bit as time went on with the V11 models, which is confusing.

When you say there is no voltage at the ignition switch which wire are you testing?

I ass-ume you've tested/replaced the fuses, but if there is a fault of some sort and you replace a fuse a new one will just immediatley blow as well. So you need to check the fuses aren't blowing before moving onto the next problem. I'm also assuming the battery is good and not completley discharged (it happens), so obvious as it is (forgive me for suggesting) but first check the battery voltage and ensure the battery ground is good.

There is a black/yellow wire fed directly from the battery to fuses 4 & 5. The other side of fuse 4 then runs to the ignition switch a maroon or red wire, that wire is not switched, so it's live all the time no matter the position of the ignition switch.

The first thing I'd check is the fusebox, do you have voltage on fuses 4 & 5, if not then it's a problem with the black yellow feed from battery to fusebox. If you do have voltage on these fuses (check both sides), but no voltage at the switch on the red wire then the problem lies between the fusebox and the ignition switch.

There appears to be a 4 way AMP connector, probably close to the switch, in the line as well, so that's also worth taking a look at.

A bad Reg/Rec can cause sometimes result in a parasitic drain, as I remember if it's damaged. The feed for the charging circuit is through Fuse 3, it's 30 Amp, I've not heard of one causing a short. If testing you can remove fuse 3, to take the charge circuit out the picture, when testing at the ignition switch and that would stop any short through it. I don't think that's a problem but it's an easy thing to do.

That's a start, if you have power to the switch then we can try to move on from there

Can you give us any more details of what are the symptons

John

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Hi Guys 

Thank you for your replies - both docc and weegee appreciated !  The battery good - it's a new Hawker battery and since the mishap - I've put it on an Optimate battery charger and it charges OK and the Optimate seems to be saying it's good and not toast.....

@docc - Thanks for the pic of the Voltage regulator - that's helpful and is where I'd assumed it to be. It does look quite different from the ones for sale on *bay though ? 

@Weegee - in starting to test the voltages - am I right in using a multimeter set to 20v and then place across the neg/pos of fuse holder ? 

I'll come back to you both with some pics - most likely tomorrow eve

Thanks again

David

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1 hour ago, Voldav said:

@Weegee - in starting to test the voltages - am I right in using a multimeter set to 20v and then place across the neg/pos of fuse holder ? 

I'll come back to you both with some pics - most likely tomorrow eve

Thanks again

David

Hi David

@docc is great & very helpful, as you can see from my bikes on the signature I don't own a V11 but have a Sporti (its older brother in some respects)

Anyway, set your multimeter to 20V DC (as you've said) and put the negative lead onto the engine casings or the battery negative and leave it there (a crocodile clip is handy to do this). Place the positive lead onto the point where you want to measure voltage. Check for volts at either side of the fuses.

If you place the positive and negative at either side of the fuse you will always measure 0 Volts regardless of the voltage at the fuse. A meter measures voltage difference, not absolute values. There will be almost no voltage difference across the fuse, so the meter will read 0 Volts (or very close), no matter the actual voltage at the fuse, 12V-12V=0V & 0V-0V=0V.

I'm not trying to be facetious, just trying to make it clear why, I've been caught out that way too, it's easy to get confused.

I'm placing my bet on the ignition switch being faulty, so the first thing to do is to find out if you have voltage on the red wire going into the switch. Same procedure as for the fuses, negative lead on the casings positive lead onto the connector/wire.

If you don't have voltage there then check the fuses.

If you do have voltage on the red wire at the ignition then check the wires coming out of the switch.

With the ignition switch ON, from the diagram I'm using there are 2 wires to check a pink/blue and a grey/red. If volts on red but none on the other 2 you need to get the switch out and from other threads on here it can be taken apart, cleaned and regreased.

As no V11, for me (for now) I don't how easy or hard that is to do

Be interested to see what you get and looking forward to the pics :D

John

 

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Hi John, thank you for your reply and the additional testing advice - that is really appreciated. I realise I’m on a steep learning curve here.

i’ll follow your instructions and do some testing of the voltage at the weekend. I had thought it maybe was the ignition switch and had bought a replacement and connected it up - but didn’t help in any way…

I’ll get back to you once I have more info 

Thanks again 

David

 

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When you're ready David

Looks like I've lost my bet then ;)

Trouble shooting electrics, looks horible at first, way too many wires on the bike and lines on the diagram. As you get to grips with how it works though it becomes (a little) clearer. The downside is that some of Guzzi's wiring philosophy is, at times, a tad bizzare (trying to avoid 4 letter expletives here).

The easiest way I can think of to check the voltage at the ignition switch is to undo the 4 way AMP connector local to it and use something like a thin paper clip or a needle down the hole in the plug where the red wire goes into, on the loom side. Then put your pos probe onto said needle/paper clip. You should see 12Volts.

It will probably not be so easy to measure the volts on the outgoing wires from the ignition switch. You could check resistance across the switch, but sticking with volts for now. Connect the plug together, switch ON the ignition switch and check the voltage at fuses 6 & 7, you should be seeing 12 Volts. Next is to locate the Headlight Relay.

@docc as you know these machines any chance of a listing of which relay is which, physically on the bike because I'm clueless here?

Once you've found it remove the relay and check the voltage where the pink/blue wire goes into the relay socket (the ignition switch is still ON right?). It will be on the socket where either pin 1 or pin 2 plug into. Below is a diagram showing the pins on the relay, the V11 uses the 5 Pin Micro Relay.

If you're not sure which wire is which it doesn't matter one of the pins (either pin1 or pin2) should read 12 Volts and the other 0 Volts

 

ISO_Micro_Relay_Pinout.jpg

 

 

When you've had time to have a go at it come back with some more info and we can see if any of us can up with more ideas on where to go next

John

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I said this on my first post but going to ask the obvious again.

All the connections are on the battery positive and they are clean? The same goes for the negative connection at the battery make sure it's clean. I usually clean them up with some Emery cloth, tighten and apply Vaseline/petroleum jelly

Make sure to also check the where the negative battery cable is connected to the frame/engine. Remove that connection and give it a good clean, tighten it all back up and more Vaseline/petroleum jelly. If the connection from the battery negative to the frame/engine is poor then you're going nowhere.

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1 hour ago, Weegie said:

I said this on my first post but going to ask the obvious again.

All the connections are on the battery positive and they are clean? The same goes for the negative connection at the battery make sure it's clean. I usually clean them up with some Emery cloth, tighten and apply Vaseline/petroleum jelly

Make sure to also check the where the negative battery cable is connected to the frame/engine. Remove that connection and give it a good clean, tighten it all back up and more Vaseline/petroleum jelly. If the connection from the battery negative to the frame/engine is poor then you're going nowhere.

Ah, yes. Such easily overlooked things as an overzealous application of insulation to the battery cables. This one was actually OK, but just barely. I cleaned the extra bit away, gave it a bit of a brush and DeoxIt'ed the heck out of it.

IMG_3132.JPG

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Hi Weegee & PO18guy

Thanks for your additional info - and apologies for the late reply - work has been full on (new job) so that has had to be my priority at the moment.

@Weegee - I will follow your instructions, when I look at the bike at the weekend - so Thanks again - appreciated.

@PO18GUY - I will also look at the battery earth lead and give it a good clean 

Sorry - this might be a slow process - as having to find the time to do this around work.

I'll try and post some additional pics at the weekend

Thanks


David

 

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Voldav, this should be the schematic for your bike, click on it to zoom in.

Fuses 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 should be alive in respect of the chassis with the key Off, find a good shiny bolt and attach the negative meter lead to it.

When you turn the key On F6 & F7 will also be alive, F8 becomes alive when the bike is ready to start. If you don't find this touch the positive meter lead to the battery Negative terminal that will become negative if you have a bad ground.

I will check back in a day or so,

1999_V11_sport.gif

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