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LangleyMalc

Replacing Front wheel bearings.

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15 hours ago, Lucky Phil said:

I watched a youtube video and it looked to good to be true. Reminded me of those manufacturers instructional videos where the component literally just about falls apart in your hand but the reality is a whole lot different. Any more details on this tool scud. I mean did you give it a real testing bearing to pull? say like on the difficulty scale of a Guzzi v11 swingarm pivot bearing.

Ciao    

The Pit Posse Wheel Bearing puller is not a traditional blind puller. It requires access through the wheel to drive it out. I've done several bearings with no problems.

I also have the "silver slapper" slide hammer, with which I recently removed the original wheel spindles from rusty steering knuckles on a 1997 F250. If the blind bearing tool is strong enough the slide hammer will get it out. I destroyed a Harbor Freight slide hammer and bearing pulller when I did some V11 swingarm bearings. But it did get them out... and HF gave me a full refund. FYI on slide hammers... you can wrap a towel around the slide and swing it like a baseball bat. The slide goes faster and it doesn't hurt your wrist or elbow.

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47 minutes ago, Scud said:

The Pit Posse Wheel Bearing puller is not a traditional blind puller. It requires access through the wheel to drive it out. I've done several bearings with no problems.

I also have the "silver slapper" slide hammer, with which I recently removed the original wheel spindles from rusty steering knuckles on a 1997 F250. If the blind bearing tool is strong enough the slide hammer will get it out. I destroyed a Harbor Freight slide hammer and bearing pulller when I did some V11 swingarm bearings. But it did get them out... and HF gave me a full refund. FYI on slide hammers... you can wrap a towel around the slide and swing it like a baseball bat. The slide goes faster and it doesn't hurt your wrist or elbow.

Ok thanks Scud. Looks like a decent investment then. I have a theory on getting out the s/arm bearings. Use an internal puller but instead of using a slide hammer directly on the puller use a metal tube and bolt arrangement to apply constant pulling force on the bearing then impact the arm around the bearing with a copper hammer and or use the slide hammer in conjunction with the static pulling force. The piece you are using the slide hammer on has to be very heavy or very well anchored for them to be effective. Pit bull make a harley wheel bearing puller with the thinking I'm thinking somewhat

Ciao   

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I am considering retraining as a gynaecologist.
 

On the front nipple, after a cup of tea and some lunch I went back, removed the final drive and half the prop shaft (having first marked it) and could then just see the joint at the end of the tunnel through the swing arm. So lying on the floor i pulled of the red cover and then tried my right angle adaptor for the grease gun but that would not hook up.

so. Got an old grease gun with a solid tube on it about 10 inches long and put a 45 degree bend in the tube at the delivery end and a flexible hose between the pipe and the gun. End result was that I could then get on the nipple (3rd attempt) and get some grease in. Last problem was getting the little red cap back but filled it with grease and then stuck it to my finger with more grease to locate it on the nipple and could then push it on. 
 

There goes two hours I will never get back but a side benefit is that I am draining the final drive through the level plug while it is off the bike!

There will be more. You have been warned. 

Thanks for all your suggestions. 
 

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I've been at this front U-joint thing a long time. No one has framed the question better than "dangerous" . .  .

This is what I use:

Threadless+-+Dr.+Suess+Inspired+T-Shirt+

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Some good mcgyver tips here,

SCUD, I've never heard of using the towel on the slide hammer, that sounds like a good one to save on the wear and tear on the old body. 

Phil, if I understand correctly, I gather you mean placing a piece of large diameter tube/pipe 2"-3" and slipping the puller jaws inside and using the tube against the frame or hub to anchor the pressure on the outside instead of the inside like a regular 3 way puller set up?

I'm not recommending it and it sounds rough, but when I took a quick look on google, a lot of people without pullers or able to get access with a punch; have used concrete bolt anchors carefully secured and tightened tight against the wheel bearings then drifted out carefully from the other side, throwing the info out there in case someone ever gets stuck without the right tools as an fyi.

Kelly

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40 minutes ago, 80CX100 said:

Some good mcgyver tips here,

SCUD, I've never heard of using the towel on the slide hammer, that sounds like a good one to save on the wear and tear on the old body. 

Phil, if I understand correctly, I gather you mean placing a piece of large diameter tube/pipe 2"-3" and slipping the puller jaws inside and using the tube against the frame or hub to anchor the pressure on the outside instead of the inside like a regular 3 way puller set up?

I'm not recommending it and it sounds rough, but when I took a quick look on google, a lot of people without pullers or able to get access with a punch; have used concrete bolt anchors carefully secured and tightened tight against the wheel bearings then drifted out carefully from the other side, throwing the info out there in case someone ever gets stuck without the right tools as an fyi.

Kelly

I was thinking of this system for the swingarm bearings. As I said slide hammer pullers aren't usually much good unless the item has a lot of mass. Of course the disassemble the bearing and use the stick welder on the outer race always works just takes a while to do.

Ciao

  

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11 hours ago, LangleyMalc said:

I am considering retraining as a gynaecologist.
 

On the front nipple, after a cup of tea and some lunch I went back, removed the final drive and half the prop shaft (having first marked it) and could then just see the joint at the end of the tunnel through the swing arm. So lying on the floor i pulled of the red cover and then tried my right angle adaptor for the grease gun but that would not hook up.

so. Got an old grease gun with a solid tube on it about 10 inches long and put a 45 degree bend in the tube at the delivery end and a flexible hose between the pipe and the gun. End result was that I could then get on the nipple (3rd attempt) and get some grease in. Last problem was getting the little red cap back but filled it with grease and then stuck it to my finger with more grease to locate it on the nipple and could then push it on. 
 

There goes two hours I will never get back but a side benefit is that I am draining the final drive through the level plug while it is off the bike!

There will be more. You have been warned. 

Thanks for all your suggestions. 
 

Congratulations. :grin: Now, I won't have to find that picture of the same thing I made up. I put the nozzle on the lathe and turned a little taper and chamfer on it to help. Third attempt is pretty good. :rasta:

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I am falling back in Love with my Guzzi - this week.
What I love about Guzzi’s apart from the fact that they are relatively bullet proof and at the same time interesting and different, is the need for a multitude of specialty fabricated tools to do routine maintenance. Based on Chuck’s last remark it now appears that I need to talk to “err indoors“  and justify the purchase of a small lathe to add to my wish list.  (I have always wanted a lathe).

the other thing that the battle against Luigi’s maintenance friendly engineering is teaching me is endless patience and the value of a good forum full of people who have been there before me and are prepared to answer dumb questions!😳

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Always like Kukko pullers and tools.  Expensive but I haven't found a bearing it couldn't pull yet.

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I can not recall the meaning/designation (or the thread with the answer) of the numbers and letters following the bearing number. ie; 6204-2RSH/C3 or 6205-LLBC3/EM

I used to know:oldgit:

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Go to a bearing website and see . I had a SKF paper printed , lost it . The suffix will describe quality , high speed or not , grease quality , etc. Don't think any 204 will do . Don't think the $7.95 bearing is as good as a $19.95 bearing . Do the research , do you want to be on the side of the road or in your driveway enjoying Eric Clapton on the CD player while you and your friends are discussing the day's ride ?

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Yeah , you will have to use the document for the brand . My SKF stuff doesn't break the suffix down for the part # suffix you posted .

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4 hours ago, footgoose said:

 

I can not recall the meaning/designation (or the thread with the answer) of the numbers and letters following the bearing number. ie; 6204-2RSH/C3 or 6205-LLBC3/EM

I used to know:oldgit:

I found this white paper with some useful breakdowns, but may be manufacturer specific to a degree.

https://www.astbearings.com/radial-ball-bearing-nomenclature-and-numbering-system.html

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So, I'm getting

6204 = size

2RS = 2 rubber seals

H = Metric stainless steel

C3 = internal clearance 5-10 micrometers  (I recall this is greater clearance than "standard" and my be desirable in applications like our reardrive.)

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33 minutes ago, docc said:

So, I'm getting

6204 = size

2RS = 2 rubber seals

H = Metric stainless steel

C3 = internal clearance 5-10 micrometers  (I recall this is greater clearance than "standard" and my be desirable in applications like our reardrive.)

No need for C3 bearings with additional clearance docc. These are only generally used for high speed or conditions that generate higher bearing temps. Wheel bearings dont fit that criterior.

Ciao

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