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Replacing Front wheel bearings.


LangleyMalc
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17 minutes ago, Lucky Phil said:

No need for C3 bearings with additional clearance docc. These are only generally used for high speed or conditions that generate higher bearing temps. Wheel bearings dont fit that criterior.

Ciao

Thanks for that clarification. :thumbsup:

After my angrifying wheel bearing failure 310 miles from home, I ended up with C3 Koyo and thought, "Well the extra clearance can't hurt."

 . . .  Can it? :unsure:

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Just now, docc said:

Thanks for that clarification. :thumbsup:

After my angrifying wheel bearing failure 310 miles from home, I ended up with C3 Koyo and thought, "Well the extra clearance can't hurt."

 . . .  Can it? :unsure:

Well, probably not docc, C3's are generally harder to get and often special order, here at least mostly. How may miles on the failed bearings? Always wise the measure the spacer length if the bearings aren't lasting as long as they should.

Ciao

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42 minutes ago, Lucky Phil said:

Well, probably not docc, C3's are generally harder to get and often special order, here at least mostly. How may miles on the failed bearings? Always wise the measure the spacer length if the bearings aren't lasting as long as they should.

Ciao

Your advice on this last year suggested C2 or C3 "for greater life", so I have had more confidence that the C3 were a good thing.

39 minutes ago, gstallons said:

Be VERY careful installing any roller bearing . They cannot tolerate any axial load . Remember the spacer problem from the past !

Yeah, this was my rather bizarre rear bearing failures at 680 miles after careful installation of what were supposed to be quality SKF bearings. Turns out I did have the 1mm short spacer all this time with shortened bearing lives. But never that short!

My conclusions went along the lines of "stacked tolerances" which included possibly excessive pinion bearing play that was likely aggravated by the shaft yoke failure the previous year.

IMG_8890.jpg

Mind you, all, this spacer business is slightly off-topic as it refers to the rear wheel bearings.

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Yes docc my advice was what I "suspected" depending on whether or not the bearing when fitted was tight to turn with a std clearance which would indicated too much interference on the fit. If that was the case i'd go for a C3, but all things being equal with proper housing to bearing interference std bearings are the way to go. A C3 wont hurt it's just not required unless there is an issue as mentioned.

The spacer dimension is critical on the front as well but if the bearings are doing 50,000 or more miles then it's probably not an issue. If bearings are failing early then the clearance and spacer dimensions need looking at.

My rear wheel bearings are tighter than ideal when fitted and I suspect they may need C3's on the next replacement depending on mileage.

Ciao 

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4 minutes ago, Lucky Phil said:

Yes docc my advice was what I "suspected" depending on whether or not the bearing when fitted was tight to turn with a std clearance which would indicated too much interference on the fit. If that was the case i'd go for a C3, but all things being equal with proper housing to bearing interference std bearings are the way to go. A C3 wont hurt it's just not required unless there is an issue as mentioned.

The spacer dimension is critical on the front as well but if the bearings are doing 50,000 or more miles then it's probably not an issue. If bearings are failing early then the clearance and spacer dimensions need looking at.

My rear wheel bearings are tighter than ideal when fitted and I suspect they may need C3's on the next replacement depending on mileage.

Ciao 

Well, if its about "issues" I gots 'em . . .  :blink:

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thanks guys. I've done net searches but so far a waste of time. I will return to my bearing dealer, just down the street and ask again. He told me once, I wrote it down and promptly lost it. He was very helpful and sold me NTN brand as their high end. (the ones with the BLLC3) Made in USA. I got some SKF's from Bulgaria off ebay for my stash. Any 'western world' country is ok with me. Just not interested in countries whose factories aren't terribly interested in making a good impression on me. Yes, I know China can produce quality product, ...they will remain at the bottom of my list.

I will return with what I find out

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  • 1 year later...
On 5/30/2020 at 7:03 PM, Lucky Phil said:

Yes docc my advice was what I "suspected" depending on whether or not the bearing when fitted was tight to turn with a std clearance which would indicated too much interference on the fit. If that was the case i'd go for a C3, but all things being equal with proper housing to bearing interference std bearings are the way to go. A C3 wont hurt it's just not required unless there is an issue as mentioned.

The spacer dimension is critical on the front as well but if the bearings are doing 50,000 or more miles then it's probably not an issue. If bearings are failing early then the clearance and spacer dimensions need looking at.

My rear wheel bearings are tighter than ideal when fitted and I suspect they may need C3's on the next replacement depending on mileage.

Ciao 

Revisiting this forum's kind and helpful advice.  Just mounted mySport's 26th front tire and the left side bearing was declared "noisy."  65,000 miles since the Turkish SNF replacement at 60,000 miles seems proper.

For the V11 whose front axle shoulders on the right (20mm ID) bearing and the spacer extends through the left (larger, 25mm ID) bearing with the chromed sleeve fitted to index the inside of the left fork leg, the bearings are actually straightforward to remove . . .

The spacer has an internal shoulder against the inside of the left side bearing inner race and can be used to drift our the right side bearing with a soft hammer, brass or copper or a soft drift. Once the right side bearing drops out , the spacer can be removed and the left bearing easily drifted out from inside the hub.

IMG_7491.jpg

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