Jump to content

Grrrreenie - the long and whining roar


Recommended Posts

Why is everybody talking about Loctite!?
Again, there was no trace of red Loctite on the damned screw. Galvanic corrosion because someone put SS screws in aluminum.

I’m from up north and speaks a strange language, so if my writings is unclear; sorry about that. Do as best as I can. Haha...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 94
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Miss Greenie is leaving the basement next weekend and moving in here. Almost every hour of my spare time since July has been laid down. Tired and satisfied. Is it worth it? I don't know. The fact I di

Hello, V11 aficionados! This thread is about me and my Greenie. Good days and bad days. A steep learning curve, maintenance, and later on some tuning and styling. I bought the '00 V11 Greeni

[LuckyPhil said]: Look at my V11 Daytona project thread. Lots of info on gearbox cracking there. Ciao ______________________________________________________________________________

Posted Images

Heat is the answer, it softens Loctite.  A large soldering iron will do the job, I always use that trick to remove brake rotor fasteners.

Yep, heat was the answer. If you take a close look at the photo, you’ll see a small blow torch on the left.

Thanks for the tip about using soldering iron. Very good idea! Next time

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Link to post
Share on other sites

9d3766857e1d452b032cc7cf708139a2.jpg

New manual petcock installed. The threads looks a bit fragile to me and the petcock hasn’t the highest quality standard. But hey, if it doesn’t leak I’m happy.

Not sure what to do about those two vent lines under the tank. Page 56 in the spare parts catalog doesn’t show any vent lines... The left side tap hadn’t any hose connected. The right side hose ended above the gearbox.

The pressure regulator also hadn’t any hose connected. From the parts manual, I think it should be connected to the right side TB.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Link to post
Share on other sites

Underside the tank, the right nipple is the overflow and the left is the vent as I recall. They can simply be "T'd" together with a connecting fitting if you wish.

Correct, the regulator gets return fuel from the right injector which gets its flow from the left injector.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, thanks, gentlemen. I'm learning something new every day.
I had yet another good time in the basement this evening. Progression is steady but slow. Waiting for the oil pan to return after glass bead blasting. Still cleaning TBs ao parts. Reading, thinking, and reading some more.

Newbie alert: I wonder if I should replace the rear shock with an Öhlins or Wilbers... Now or later. Hmmm. Greenie has the original blue/white shock(Sachs?). Is this the right time, or can it wait?

One more thing. I just found out that Miss Greenie has a drinking problem. She must go to rehab very soon.

Sooty spark. Miss Greenie has got to much to drink...

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

While it is apart is ideal. You will not be disappointed in a better shock.

Yet, riding it a season with the Sachs will give you the joy of knowing the improvement!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I had my original shock rebuilt with a heavier spring.  I did it because the external adjuster didn't work. 

I ultimately had more noticeable results just playing with the adjusters on the fork.  The issue I had was weave at higher speeds with those big HB Jr bags.  I experimented quite a bit stiffening the rear, when I should've been softening the front.  That was the key for me.  I discovered it when I had a new front tire installed it was loaded with max air.  The front was just bouncing all over the road and weaving.  I wasted some time adjusting air pressure when the fork adjusters were right in front of my face.  (Of course the rear tire should always carry 4lb more air than the front.)

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, hammershaug said:

Okay, thanks, gentlemen. I'm learning something new every day.
I had yet another good time in the basement this evening. Progression is steady but slow. Waiting for the oil pan to return after glass bead blasting. Still cleaning TBs ao parts. Reading, thinking, and reading some more.

Newbie alert: I wonder if I should replace the rear shock with an Öhlins or Wilbers... Now or later. Hmmm. Greenie has the original blue/white shock(Sachs?). Is this the right time, or can it wait?

One more thing. I just found out that Miss Greenie has a drinking problem. She must go to rehab very soon.

Sooty spark. Miss Greenie has got to much to drink...

 

 

Forget about making fuel consumption assumptions based on reading plugs on a road bike. Fuel consumption is measured at the fuel station with mileage V refill qty calculation. Road bike plug readings dont really mean much, too may variables.

I'd ditch the fine wire plugs on this engine as well, just stick with the std plugs.

I've been recommending Wilbers shocks for years and have the highest spec one on my bike which was custom made for my weight,riding and conditions. I also have a Wilbers on my GSXR1000 track bike and race spec Ohlins on my 1198 and poor mans Ohlins on my 1000ss. The Wilbers is better quality than the OEM Ohlins and a little below the TTX Ohlins on the 1198 in my view. I wouldnt chase a second hand Ohlins for your bike( because thats all thats available these days) for some silly money when you can buy something thats considerable better for less money new.

Ciao      

Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you good w/a DVOM and reading wiring diagrams ? Check the resistance of both the air temp sensor and the cylinder head ( oil temp ) sensor at the ECU connector . They had better be the same of within 250 ohms . 

If you are running a PowerCommander , take it off and try it . I messed with mine all this spring to find out the PC was !@#$%^ up .

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hammershaug

Second Lucky Phil on ditching the fine wire (iridium) plugs.

But don’t stick with std plugs either (as an aside Mike Rich recommends dropping two grades cooler).

Do your bike a favour and upgrade with two LR12ZS multi spark plugs by Brisk. I’ve been using these for years - don’t listen to any diehard NGK naysayers who haven’t used them.

If you haven’t heard of Brisk?

Try - thank me later! 👍😎

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ScuRoo said:

Hammershaug

Second Lucky Phil on ditching the fine wire (iridium) plugs.

But don’t stick with std plugs either (as an aside Mike Rich recommends dropping two grades cooler).

Do your bike a favour and upgrade with two LR12ZS multi spark plugs by Brisk. I’ve been using these for years - don’t listen to any diehard NGK naysayers who haven’t used them.

If you haven’t heard of Brisk?

Try - thank me later! 👍😎

 

 

I've heard of them, expensive from what I remember. I'm a bit more interested in validated scientific data myself as opposed to pretty pictures. Like magic oil and fuel additives and all manner of other mythical additives I need more than silly gimmicky observations. How many GP engines are using them?

Ciao  

Link to post
Share on other sites

In opposition, I have removed the OEM plugs and installed Iridium. I noted quicker starts right off the bat. On DW's Lexus, the NGK Iridium originals went 250K before replacement, and we noticed zero difference. Now, I'll grant that the MG combustion chamber is more akin to a 1930s Pratt & Whitney radial than to  a liquid-cooled 4-valve Japanese chamber, but anytime you can unshroud the spark in such a deep chamber, I figure it's worth a try.  I also note that the MG engineers were negligent in not placing the plugs on the pushrod side of the head - making them Italo-easy to change.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, po18guy said:

In opposition, I have removed the OEM plugs and installed Iridium. I noted quicker starts right off the bat. On DW's Lexus, the NGK Iridium originals went 250K before replacement, and we noticed zero difference. Now, I'll grant that the MG combustion chamber is more akin to a 1930s Pratt & Whitney radial than to  a liquid-cooled 4-valve Japanese chamber, but anytime you can unshroud the spark in such a deep chamber, I figure it's worth a try.  I also note that the MG engineers were negligent in not placing the plugs on the pushrod side of the head - making them Italo-easy to change.  

My biggest issue with fine wire plugs is once they are fowled they are junk. Cleaning them is pointless. On an ultra modern lean running engine there're fine and my cars and My 1198 have them but on an older air cooled less sophisticatedly fuelled engine I'll stick with the older cheap plugs. You fowl one you whip it out and clean it and its good to go again. 

Fine wire are also great for longevity and advantageous where plug access is difficult so increased change out intervals means lower servicing costs. But as I said where's the actual measureable performance stats? I'm sure they're are some somewhere but if the advantages were so amazingly great then it would be everywhere and it's not.

I suspect their greatest advantage is in long change out intervals and therefore lower servicing costs. The rest is much more vague and airy fairy.    

Ciao

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...