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ECU limited by stock O2


ScuRoo
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"Okay, Houston... we've had a problem here.”

https://www.abc.net.au/science/k2/moments/gmis9906.htm

Your US model V11 didn’t come with the O2 sensor p6x - which creates the closed-loop feedback to the ECU refining the STFT & LTFT functions.

As Mr Cameron pointed out, “If there is an oxygen sensor in the exhaust system, it detects any deviation from the desired mixture and the ECU corrects it.”

The Italian’s discovered the MG oem sensor was flawed (as did Fiat).

Only relevant for those V11’s 15RC O2 equipped - swapping the sensor unleashes the ECU to perform optimally.

Good luck with tyre!

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  • 8 months later...

Hi all,

What is your experience in fitting the Bosch LSH24 0258003805 sensor in place of the original O2 sensor? I have a 2003 Ballabio with closed loop O2 sensor and original exhaust. I have discovered that the original O2 sensor was faulty so I am in the process of replacement. I was following the recommendations of ScuRoo here on this thread I acquired the Bosch LSH24 0258003805 sensor, however, the Bosch LSH24 sensor has slighly wider collar and I am not sure if it fits in the exhaust hole. The collar is simply too wide in diameter and is pushing against the frame bar. Please see the pictures for better explanation. The original O2 sensor collar is 16 mm in diameter and the Bosch LSH24 0258003805 sensor is 21 mm.

Anybody experiencing the same problem and if so what was your remedy?

20220901_175952-copy.jpg

20220901_180229-copy.jpg

20220901_181115-copy.jpg

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On 8/20/2020 at 4:46 PM, ScuRoo said:

Okay... before I go further - on my bike the O2 sensor site was relocated on the left header just in front of the oil dipstick when a MassMoto X-over was installed. The existing O2 sensor was just rerouted to that location.

Whilst my bike was noticeably freer-breathing from mid revs all the way to redline and my riding habits had shifted up the range by some 500-1000rpms - what should be noted was that there was no real actual change to my bikes modus operandi style in the low range.

There was that occasional fart, sometimes a stumble, a miss... all the usual things that’s inherent in our V11’s character.

However, after translating Ube’s 2006 posting recommendation I set to sourcing & pricing up the genuine Bosch LSH24 sensor identified as the LS3805 aka 0258003805.

Removing the existing sensor it was a surprise to find it was an NTK OZA341-BB1 sensor. More research subsequently revealed this was the NTK manufactured equivalent  to Bosch‘s LSH15 calibration curve.

After install for the first two rides on seperate days an adaptation procedure was followed:

1. Start engine & allow to idle for 5 minutes.

2. Drive vehicle for 5 minutes between 20 & 30 MPH. Do not allow RPM’s to exceed 3000 RPM’s.

3. Drive vehicle for 15 minutes between 40 & 60 MPH. Do not allow RPM’s to exceed 3000 RPM’s.

4. Stop vehicle & allow to idle for 5 minutes.
 

(It’s late - be back tomorrow... 💤)

 

Hello ScuRoo, were you able to fit the Bosch LSH24 0258003805 sensor in place of the original O2 sensor? I have a problem with the diameter of the Bosch sensor collar, it is pushing against the frame in place where the original O2 sensor was ok. Please see my reply to the topic at the end of this thread – there are pics explaining the issue. Thanks for advice    

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On 8/20/2020 at 10:46 PM, ScuRoo said:

Okay... before I go further - on my bike the O2 sensor site was relocated on the left header just in front of the oil dipstick when a MassMoto X-over was installed. The existing O2 sensor was just rerouted to that location.

My sensor bung site was relocated when I installed my MassMoto crossover Miro Kacur.

With regards to yours abutting the frame the width difference is effectively 2.5mm wider each side than your stock sensor - I’m guessing it’s lightly touching otherwise you wouldn’t have been able to line it up & screw it in otherwise. Although I agree touching is not ideal.

So what to do as a solution?

Well, in the first instance I’d probably release all the clamps around the stock collector joining the stock pipes & tug & pull, yank & twist to try & gain an extra 1 or 2mm of clearance if possible. Swearing & banging with & rubber mallet might help too!

Maybe even give it a start & some blipping revs or short ride with those pipe joints loose & try to bang squeeze some sort of wedge in there like a hacksaw blade - hopefully any engine twisting in frame with loose joint will help some readjustment.

Then after tightening pipe joints remove wedge & hopefully have some sort of resettlement with 1 or 2mm clearance.

Bush fixes I’d try first.

If all that malarkey fails just get new bung fitted wherever you’d think appropriate.

On my relocation site choice I researched first that O2 sensors should be reasonably close to exhaust valve exit - from memory I think it was recommended like 12-18 inches - but you can check.

They like a hot temperature environment - & with no possibility of contamination of outside air from end pipe ingress.

Finally imo - I’d worry less than you & being happy I’d simply managed to screw it in place - just plug in & go ride as is & test the new differences to your bike.

It’s your call MK in best routes to alleviating the frame rub

I’m looking forward to your report back on your bikes behaviour

👍😎

Ps. Mine after long period of time now - remains completely smooth & 100% hiccup snatch free

Totally recommend for 15RC fitted V11’s

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C191EF3A-E9EC-4227-9DCC-1E2DD852C818.jpeg

https://www.guzzifan.com/moto-guzzi-tuning-codes-infos-tips/

Also recommended:

After install for the first two rides on seperate days an adaptation procedure was followed:

1. Start engine & allow to idle for 5 minutes.

2. Drive vehicle for 5 minutes between 20 & 30 MPH. Do not allow RPM’s to exceed 3000 RPM’s.

3. Drive vehicle for 15 minutes between 40 & 60 MPH. Do not allow RPM’s to exceed 3000 RPM’s.

4. Stop vehicle & allow to idle for 5 minutes.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 9/3/2022 at 2:32 PM, Miro Kacur said:

Thanks, I will evaluate the options and let you all know which one worked out for me :)

Dear All,

After weighing all the options I found the most feasible solution to replace the faulty stock O2 sensor with the BOSCH Type LSH 24, LS 6206, part.no 0258006206, length 325 mm

The „collar“ of the above mentioned sensor is 18mm which is slightly wider than the original stock sensor’s 16mm (for full details see my post from Sep 2 above), nevertheless, it fits in the place. I don’t have any info about actual performance because I need to reassemble the rear drive, put the wheel back, etc…

So to recap -> if you are to replace your stock O2 sensor on V11 Ballabio 2004 (in the post above I have wrongly stated that I have Ballabio 2003, but in fact I have 2004)  with stock cross-over, you might have to opt for the BOSCH Type LSH 24, LS 6206, part.no 0258006206, length 325 mm which is the one that can fit in the tight space and does not interfere with the engine block frame.

Miro

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