Jump to content
IGNORED

MDI Carbon Alternator / Stator cover


4corsa
 Share

Recommended Posts

Just received mine from MDI, only took around 3 weeks. Quality is very good, plate indent is centered, and fastener tabs are very beefy - will not have any breakage issues (unless they are off-center and require the holes to be enlarged). Will post install photos, but initial report is great quality, especially for $80.06a3f27c5cff36bb345064531c647ae4.jpg

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Installed - I think it goes well with the Ghezzi Brian cf belly pan.

Also, I'm offering a $5,000 reward for information leading to the apprehension of the %@!! Individual who applied red Loctite to one of the 4 screws. 2 hours to finally remove with an impact driver that was askew by a good 15° due to the wheel in the way. Had to use the impact driver for more than half the length of the screw!f7d51d899e2f3c7b4c908056ecab95d7.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
  • Confused 1
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Prior owner likely. Mine came off with ease but was thinking I might need some Loctite to keep the cover on in fear of overtorquing. Didn't need it though. 

Looks good, right? 😉

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That is a classy look! :thumbsup:

The only cf (CFRP) on my Sport are the Moto Guzzi "For Off Road Only" exhaust canisters. In 2000, I was thinking carbon fiber (CFRP) was still pretty cutting edge at that time.  Probably not, though. :huh2:

I also remember the assertion about electrolytic activity in contact with aluminum. Has anyone actually seen this? Should something like the alternator cover be have a good paint layer on the surface of the timing chest where the contact is?

"The carbon fibers can cause galvanic corrosion when CRP parts are attached to aluminum." (Wiki CFRP)

[edit: Wait, there is that plastic spacer under the alt cover. So, not contact there.]

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, docc said:

That is a classy look! :thumbsup:

The only cf (CFRP) on my Sport are the Moto Guzzi "For Off Road Only" exhaust canisters. In 2000, I was thinking carbon fiber (CFRP) was still pretty cutting edge at that time.  Probably not, though. :huh2:

I also remember the assertion about electrolytic activity in contact with aluminum. Has anyone actually seen this? Should something like the alternator cover be have a good paint layer on the surface of the timing chest where the contact is?

"The carbon fibers can cause galvanic corrosion when CRP parts are attached to aluminum." (Wiki CFRP)

[edit: Wait, there is that plastic spacer under the alt cover. So, not contact there.]

Maybe but not at that capacity.. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 hours ago, docc said:

That is a classy look! :thumbsup:

The only cf (CFRP) on my Sport are the Moto Guzzi "For Off Road Only" exhaust canisters. In 2000, I was thinking carbon fiber (CFRP) was still pretty cutting edge at that time.  Probably not, though. :huh2:

I also remember the assertion about electrolytic activity in contact with aluminum. Has anyone actually seen this? Should something like the alternator cover be have a good paint layer on the surface of the timing chest where the contact is?

"The carbon fibers can cause galvanic corrosion when CRP parts are attached to aluminum." (Wiki CFRP)

[edit: Wait, there is that plastic spacer under the alt cover. So, not contact there.]

I've had this discussion before at length docc. In 35 years of using a LOT of CF parts on bikes and on top of that in aviation I've never experienced it. It's another one of those Theory V practice things you come across regularly. I've always taken the view that theory has it's place especially when you're designing something or have zero practical experience in the area but I've generally sided with what is demonstrated to work in actuality over being a slave to the theory. As I said my experience demonstrates it's not an issue, for me at least. On an ocean going racing yacht with a CF hull and aluminium mast in a permanent salt water environment I might show it some concern, but on a bike, no.

Ciao

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My bike had corrosion on the Ohlins front fork attachment lugs to the carbon fibre front mudguard.  Managed to clean it up then used plastic spacers.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Lucky Phil said:

I've had this discussion before at length docc. In 35 years of using a LOT of CF parts on bikes and on top of that in aviation I've never experienced it. It's another one of those Theory V practice things you come across regularly. I've always taken the view that theory has it's place especially when you're designing something or have zero practical experience in the area but I've generally sided with what is demonstrated to work in actuality over being a slave to the theory. As I said my experience demonstrates it's not an issue, for me at least. On an ocean going racing yacht with a CF hull and aluminium mast in a permanent salt water environment I might show it some concern, but on a bike, no.

Ciao

 

YAH....I worked with Ocean going racing Yachts for years..Then you have a concern..but so far have never seen the need for  a Galvanic Anode on a Motorcycle....B)..:bier:

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...