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This is about tires and changers.

I have had a slow leak in my EV’s front tire. “Slow” as in flat in a week. I failed in finding a nail, etc., and, after consulting my texting brain trust, pulled the wheel, and gave it a bubble bath in the utility sink. Found a stretch of several inches of faint air going AWOL. :(

I then watched a bunch of youtube vids and, again, consulted my virtual enablers, all of whom said “go for it, Bill.” 

Well, I did, but now think they just wanted the post-disaster entertainment.  :rolleyes:

So, after thinking about Dirty Harry’s admonition, I gave up.  :huh2: 

This is the rest of the story of (what Kathi calls) “Bill’s Dramatic Tire-Changer Saga.”  

I would be more offended, but she is so indulgent, and goes uncomplainingly along with my Guzzi disease. :wub:   Besides, she’s right about my seemingly endless agonizing, so what can I say?  

OTOH, her smiling and amiable reaction to my various harebrained schemes and purchases is somewhat troubling, but I try not to think about that!   :whistle:

But, finally, to cut to the chase, I pulled the trigger on a No-Mar tire changer and a few doodads. I declined to go for the wheel balancer, as it seemed a bit gold-plated, and will, instead, get a Harbor Freight model, no doubt manufactured from melted down U.S. Army tanks from the Korean War! As with Kathi, I try not to think about that, either. 

Here’s what I ordered:

https://www.nomartirechanger.com/tc-ch100hd-plus.html

Here’s the WB I didn’t buy!

https://www.nomartirechanger.com/motorcycle-wheel-balancer.html 

Here’s the HF I did:

https://www.harborfreight.com/motorcycle-wheel-balancing-stand-98488.html

I know that the tire-changer makes no real fiscal sense when I run the numbers of tires ahead in my riding life. But, that is, IMO, irrelevant as we are, after all, talking about motorcycles.  :bike:

As another Guzzista said to me, "Bill, if you try to make economic sense out of motorcycle stuff … you are on a fool's errand.”  

I look forward to learning how to use this gizmo. If in the neighborhood, using it might cost you a bottle of better bourbon or lesser grappa … and letting me watch so I learn. 

The EV will be first in the chute, but then the Stornello.  The Griso will just kibitz this season.  :mg:

1921 - 2021

Bill

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Buddy , I paid this shop $50 to swap the rear . I let them know "no mars , scratches , dings , nuthin' . I can't get another wheel like this"  . Well , after a 10 day wait for a tire changer part , it is back ( in perfect condition ) and on ! 

One of you said "new tire , new brakes" was/is right .  A law not a suggestion .  Now , all I need is time .

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From my experience those EV wheels have a tendency to leak.  They seem to get a lot of build up on the lip after tire changes.  Even when thoroughly cleaned they can sometime leak after the next mounting.

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You may not believe this, Bill. but there is a learning curve. :oldgit::) The best tip I can give you is to make absolutely sure the side opposite the one you are working on is totally down in the drop center.

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...and the tire is mounted consistent with the direction of travel!:homer:

Got a similar model (mine has the bead breaking gizmo at waist level) for myself last Xmas. Got to learn about concrete anchor bolts and hammer drills as a side benefit. One of the better investments I've made, IMO. Creates a back saving elevated work surface. Ease of use is partly a function of the wheel design; shallow drop centers are a pain (think F6B/Gold Wing). Just put a new front tire on the H2 yesterday and it took more time taking the body work off for an oil change than demounting/mounting the tire.

I don't like the fact that the wrinkle coating flakes off the center post in use with the debris falling about the wheel bearing if so equipped. I try to remember to put a rag over the bearing. 

Then there's the lube. I've been using up the NoMar stuff...and started out being pretty stingy with it. I apply it generously now (to the tire/wheel):rasta:

Follow the instructions for the demount bar (the thing you insert "flat" then rotate 90 degrees to capture the bead) carefully. If your pivot point in getting the bead to clear the wheel is too high up on the bar you'll bend/break it's tip.  Also, sometimes its difficult to get the flat part of it's tip below the bead of the tire (in preparation for rotating it 90 degrees). If you got one of their bead locking gizmos, it helps stiffen the sidewall enough locally to get the tip underneath the bead.

Ok...I've got a BMW rear staged for replacement..and keep forgetting what the mark on the new tire means...heavy or light. Gotta do some internet research....!

Enjoy!

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5 minutes ago, leroysch said:

Ok...I've got a BMW rear staged for replacement..and keep forgetting what the mark on the new tire means...heavy or light. Gotta do some internet research....!

Enjoy!

 

The tire smudge is the light point to be matched up the the heavy wheel point (valve stem)?

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I've got to relay my experiences.  I have been changing tires for 50 years using a bead breaker mounted to my bench and concrete floor, tire irons, 4x4's on a concrete floor or car tire wheel with protector on my bench,  and rim protectors.  I've always been successful, even with a 240 section Harley tire but, with the exception of the skinny '75 Triump tires, it was always a struggle.  And, anytime  I thought I had learned a trick, either it didn't work next time or it was so long between tire changes that I forgot it.

Then I bought a No Mar Classic HD along with their tire irons, Xtra hand clamp, Yellow thing and their lube and bolted it to the floor. The first tire (rear)  for my 2004V11 Le mans  tore while mounting.  I was unable to get it on without finally using tire irons and rim protectors.  So, before I mounted my same size Suzuki TL1000S rear tire, I bought a used  wheel and tire assembly off Ebay for maybe $60-$80  and practiced on it.  That's is when I learned some of the tricks.  Removing a tire is relatively easy but mounting is much more tricky.  I'll practice on my Ebay wheel/tire first when it time to change my next tire ( I have 7 bikes).  If I don't practice, I'm sure I'll look like those guys on YouTube with their tires spinning on the mountings.  

Finally, the further you get from mounting a race tire towards a touring tire, the less chance of success you'll have  mounting the tire with the mounting bar.  For my 2014 Valkyrie rear tire, I used the demount bar just fine but used only tire irons to mount it.  The a few of these tire irons: https://www.jpcycles.com/product/2170075/j-p-cycles-tire-iron-15-curved

used with a rim protector or plastic from 2 liter cola bottle will help get the last part of tire over the rim when using tire levers.  No Mar's levers are wide.

 

Frank

Good luck.

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+1 on the advice given so far, from my perspective, of about 10years with the slightly more basic, older, cheaper model of the cycle hill.
I’m a fan, and it works, and the tricks noted seem spot-on. But to double down on the touring tire comment, the no-mar clearly ain’t hydraulic, so a stiff touring tire, done in winter when it’s cold, is too much hassle for me.
Dirt bike tires are easy, basically mimicking the videos u see of folks using the NoMar so effortlessly. But a stiff walled K60 in a cold shop in winter (I try and time mx when I can for winter, non riding season), forget it. And yes, I heat the tires next to wood stove, but for some reason it just isn’t the same. Doable, and I did it for a while to justify my purchase early on, but now it’s summer only, and even then there are certain tires I just bring to the shop (hydraulics).
Mine is mounted to the concrete, works great, and I’d buy it again. But while a tkc80 is no sweat, a Shinko 705 or K60 for the rear of a big ADV bike has me inventing new curse words.

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I might've mentioned I picked up a new portable Slime air pump.  It takes up more space that the old one.  It has a simply lever chuck on it, which works much better given the air stem clearance issues with both Guzzis.  

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Hi Bill,

I bought the same model No-Mar in Jan 2019 at the International MC Show in Cleveland.  NM threw in the the scratch proof bead breaker too.  I haven't needed it yet but will in June I figure.   I've got the unit stowed in the corner of the garage but installed drop in anchors in the garage floor where I plan on using it from time to time.  I've changed many tires on a pneumatic machine but never on a manual set-up.  The NM folks have some great videos on demount & mount, I'll try to learn something before I damage a wheel or tire, I hope.  

Like Leroysch pointed out about the wrinkle finish paint on the center post, it flakes off...I don't like it either.  May have to get center post finish blasted off and recoat with krylon, rustoleum, etc.

I didn't go for the NM balancer either, bought a Marc Parnes balancer that I'll use in conjuntction with a couple of jack stands for side support.

Art

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Meant to post a slideshow of pix of installation, etc., but forgot. :doh:

Here they are.

Moto Grappa & Moto Gomme

Open the link to see in "collage;" hover cursor over pix for captions.  All best viewed in slideshow mode.

Peter Youngblood is a Guzzista saint. :notworthy:

Bill

 

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It didn't take long to get the first victim ... erm ... I mean volunteer to use the new changer.  Chris B is coming over (with his girlfriend) to swap some tires on the wheels of his Honda AT.  Sure hope she's been watching the No-Mar videos! :D

Pretty sure I am hopeful that we can R&R the tires, but way less sure that we seal the beads.

My old and large Craftsman vertical compressor ...

i-2bfpGwN-M.jpg

 

i-k5bfz7k-M.jpg

... is hors de combat with something seriously amiss in the control valving.  It screeches like [Kathi :wub: made me delete the first three analogies I used here! :P] at relatively low pressures.  I need to find someone who can see if that is fixable.  Parts seem to be few to unobtanium, with pricing to match.  

My smaller B&D one doesn't have the volume to push the beads home.  I did buy a Kobalt air tank last night to see if we can bridge the gap.  

If not, Chris (or his girlfriend :whistle:) can see if a gas-station can make that happen.  At least the tires will have been mounted.

Assuming I can get the air piece worked out, local and "furriner" Guzzisti and riders of selected Other Brands :grin:  are welcome to use it, including folks on trips who plan better than I do and want to drop-ship tires for en route swaps.  Finding shops to do this in the area is more difficult and ex$pensive than one would think.  

Off now to watch those No-Mar vids.  :luigi:

Bill

 

 

 

 

 

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