Jump to content
IGNORED

Importing a motorcycle to the US


p6x
 Share

Recommended Posts

How cumbersome is it to get an imported bike registered in the US?

Has anybody US based on this forum done it?

Once I graduate from the V11 Le Mans, I would not mind finding a companion... and I just found this one....

Look at this beauty! 1996, limited and numbered edition. But this one is in metric units. Where I am coming from, you would not be able to register a vehicle with different units, unless it is classified as historic or vintage.

If I had the funds, I would have purchased this beauty already....

Moto Guzzi Daytona Racing 1996

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, p6x said:

How cumbersome is it to get an imported bike registered in the US?

Has anybody US based on this forum done it?

Once I graduate from the V11 Le Mans, I would not mind finding a companion... and I just found this one....

Look at this beauty! 1996, limited and numbered edition. But this one is in metric units. Where I am coming from, you would not be able to register a vehicle with different units, unless it is classified as historic or vintage.

If I had the funds, I would have purchased this beauty already....

Moto Guzzi Daytona Racing 1996

 

Where is it now? Does it have a US title? Check with DMV Austin, as there are certainly specified requirements. Vintage or special interest is an exception in many titling/licensing cases.

EDIT: It is entirely possible that one may have to register the vehicle in an "easy" state, such as Oregon or Alabama, before titling it in Texas. That may require a "trusted" friend who would temporarily place it in his name before transferring to you. However, at each exchange, the taxman loometh. 

  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, po18guy said:

Where is it now? Does it have a US title? Check with DMV Austin, as there are certainly specified requirements. Vintage or special interest is an exception in many titling/licensing cases.

EDIT: It is entirely possible that one may have to register the vehicle in an "easy" state, such as Oregon or Alabama, before titling it in Texas. That may require a "trusted" friend who would temporarily place it in his name before transferring to you. However, at each exchange, the taxman loometh. 

It is in Italy!

Shipping it to the USA would be about $2000 in today's market. And that's groupage;

Then you pay the import duty and you need to get it registered.

I had that thought about your comment on "easy" states. Once it has been registered in US, it is a lot easier to do a title transfer.

As for Texas DMV's guidelines, they state that your vehicle needs first to comply to the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards as per National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) before you even attempt anything else.

I checked the list of the nonconforming vehicles eligible for importation and this particular Moto Guzzi is on the list! Daytona RS 1996. So technically, this specific model can be imported and titled in the USA.

Then the usual Texas Safety Inspection, which I don't see as a problem.

Finally, you need to obtain a VIN inspection; this sounds a little bit more exotic. The inspector is an auto-theft specialist from the law enforcement. I suspect, this is to make sure the vehicle has not been stolen before its original credentials get laundered into a new US title.

There rest of the procedure is the same for any other title transfer in Texas.

You can of course choose an import agency to do the first part for you.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, LowRyter said:

I think I'd just look for a US model.  They're out there.  Be prepared to maintain it.

Apparently, only 34 were ever imported in the US. I saw this one sold possibly as soon as posted. So, chances to find another one here in the US would be minimal.

If I had the cash, I would probably seriously think about importing the one I found in Italy. Unlike the one sold by raresportsbike, it is completely original.

As for maintenance, I suppose replacing the specific Daytona parts could be an issue. With only 308 bikes manufactured during the two years if the source is accurate; this is almost a collector.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, p6x said:

Apparently, only 34 were ever imported in the US. I saw this one sold possibly as soon as posted. So, chances to find another one here in the US would be minimal.

If I had the cash, I would probably seriously think about importing the one I found in Italy. Unlike the one sold by raresportsbike, it is completely original.

As for maintenance, I suppose replacing the specific Daytona parts could be an issue. With only 308 bikes manufactured during the two years if the source is accurate; this is almost a collector.

sorry, I thought it was a "just" a Daytona.  Not a special one of 34.  I suppose you could import a Dr John bike too?  Maybe that one is one?  I dunno. 

I see Richard Hammond, Top Gear guy was auctioning off his tonti LeMans.  Lots of cool bikes out there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, LowRyter said:

sorry, I thought it was a "just" a Daytona.  Not a special one of 34.  I suppose you could import a Dr John bike too?  Maybe that one is one?  I dunno. 

I see Richard Hammond, Top Gear guy was auctioning off his tonti LeMans.  Lots of cool bikes out there.

For the time being, I am going to concentrate on riding my humble Le Mans. Once I am satiated with it, providing it is even possible, I may get her a sister.

That Daytona RS is that kind, and if I had the means, I would not let it slip away...

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I actually did some research on this recently. If I understand correctly, as long as the bike is 25+ years old it qualifies as collectible, and exempt from USA homologation. The Department of State has all the information on their website.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, Pressureangle said:

I actually did some research on this recently. If I understand correctly, as long as the bike is 25+ years old it qualifies as collectible, and exempt from USA homologation. The Department of State has all the information on their website.

Correct. I read it too. But this is moot in that the Moto Guzzi Daytona RS has an exemption to be imported, independently of the 25 years. It is in the list of those "non-conformance" motorbikes that can be imported.

In any case, the bike being from 1996, the first box of the HS7 can be ticked.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, p6x said:

Correct. I read it too. But this is moot in that the Moto Guzzi Daytona RS has an exemption to be imported, independently of the 25 years. It is in the list of those "non-conformance" motorbikes that can be imported.

In any case, the bike being from 1996, the first box of the HS7 can be ticked.

That being the case, and your having asked the other inmates on the ward if this is not actually crazy . . .

GET IT!!

:grin:

51337098563_d64cbb8e2c_b.jpg

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
On 7/27/2021 at 6:23 PM, docc said:

That being the case, and your having asked the other inmates on the ward if this is not actually crazy . . .

GET IT!!

:grin:

51337098563_d64cbb8e2c_b.jpg

That Daytona is such a sexy beast.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/27/2021 at 12:29 PM, p6x said:

Apparently, only 34 were ever imported in the US. I saw this one sold possibly as soon as posted. So, chances to find another one here in the US would be minimal.

If I had the cash, I would probably seriously think about importing the one I found in Italy. Unlike the one sold by raresportsbike, it is completely original.

As for maintenance, I suppose replacing the specific Daytona parts could be an issue. With only 308 bikes manufactured during the two years if the source is accurate; this is almost a collector.

There was only ever 3910 Hi Cam models made in total across all the versions so if you are going to own one and put miles on it parts will be an issue. With so few built the aftermarket world will never be interested in re manufacturing stuff either. They aren't really like your traditional Guzzi BB that will do big miles as well. So it's a collectors piece in a sensible world. 

Bikes like these aren't for the average guy anymore like bevel drive Ducatis. Add up the cost of an engine rebuild on a Bevel drive these days and be sitting down when you get to the total and they built a lot more than 3910 of those. Even if you already own one the nagging worry in the back of your mind will always be parts cost and availability.

Personally I'd buy something like a Ducati 1098R if I was after a classic that will appreciate and buy some still readily available spares for it.  

Ciao

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...