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It occurred to me today...


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3 hours ago, p6x said:

Whitworth was nicknamed "Gas thread" by my Lathe instructor when we learned about threads... but we never used it.

And understanding threads is a great adventure in the world of oilfield connections... API or not....

Whitworth is still a very common general hardware thread and bolt size for use in construction etc.

Ciao

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10 hours ago, Lucky Phil said:

Whitworth is still a very common general hardware thread and bolt size for use in construction etc.

Ciao

I did not know....

I remember that on my assigned lathe, we had tables for what levers to combine according to thread types. During all my training, I never cut a single Withworth thread.

Anyway, I read the Wikipedia narrative, and learned that the 1/4" thread at the bottom of all my cameras and video cameras is a Withworth thread! all these years.

For piping, I am much more familiar with the BSP standard.

But as per our previous discussions, I always found cumbersome to deal with the multiple different  standards. With metric threads, there is a single nomenclature, or close to at least.

I also remember the nightmare to identify UNF, UNC, UNS when needing to replace something on our equipment and looking for fasteners...

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Metric is a clearly superior system. In the US, we had a chance to switch back in the late 70s or early 80s if I recall. But we blew it.

I've got plenty of 10mm wrenches and sockets. They're in caddies by ascending size. The caddies never go back in the drawer with an empty space.

And as aside... My 1997 F250 was such a PITA to work on. It was half Metric and half SAE. So I'd need to grab two sets of wrenches and two sets of sockets for every little task.

And another cool thing about metric... you can go 200 km/h on a V11, but you cannot go 200 mph. Obviously, metric is faster.

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SAE is readily understandable if you stick with decimals. Fractions not so much. Wondering if metric carpenters tell the helper to move the other end of the board about 6.35mm?

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10 minutes ago, po18guy said:

SAE is readily understandable if you stick with decimals. Fractions not so much. Wondering if metric carpenters tell the helper to move the other end of the board about 6.35mm?

Of course not because no carpenter in the world works to a tolerance of .35mm or .014" thou.

Ciao  

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On 7/31/2021 at 8:51 AM, docc said:

Getting back to mySport after an uncharacteristically extensive wrenching session on my little Honda, I had to stop reaching for the 12s and 14s and fall back to the 11, 13, 17, 19 for the Guzzi. 

"Odd", I know . . .

:grin:

Japanese metric use 12 and 14 on their bolts and Euro use 13 and 15 on theirs . There are other #s for the other sizes , but I can't remember them .   Fun Fact .

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6 hours ago, po18guy said:

SAE is readily understandable if you stick with decimals. Fractions not so much. Wondering if metric carpenters tell the helper to move the other end of the board about 6.35mm?

No, but they might say "move it about 5mm"

Using decimals with SAE to divide inches works fine, and you can get calipers that do so, but I am not aware of any tools that use decimals - I don't have a .75 inch wrench, only a 3/4 inch.

SAE is very difficult with decimals in larger measurements. But we are not consistent in the way we measure. We run a 1/4 mile, sometimes called a 440 in yards. Then we run a 100 yard dash, but never a 300 foot dash.  With SAE, you are constantly switching bases: 12:1 for inches to feet, 3:1 for feet to yards, 5,280:1 for feet to miles. It's just silly.

Metric is logical and everything is base-10, 10 of one unit always equal 1 of the next unit up, 10mm = 1cm. But some units are less frequently used, so they go 1,000:1 as in meters to kilometers. 

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Fun thread!!   I’m going to drink 1035 milliliters of Fat Tire beer, to accompany a 25.4 millimeter brisket meatball, followed off by a 3 millimeter crust on my creme brûlée, coming out of the oven at 400 Kelvin after 425 hexaseconds while sitting in my hexagonally shaped bar chair just 0.75 meters above the ground.

 

Please translate all of the above back to base 8 please and report results!  
 

😅😅

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9 hours ago, Scud said:

No, but they might say "move it about 5mm"

Using decimals with SAE to divide inches works fine, and you can get calipers that do so, but I am not aware of any tools that use decimals - I don't have a .75 inch wrench, only a 3/4 inch.

SAE is very difficult with decimals in larger measurements. But we are not consistent in the way we measure. We run a 1/4 mile, sometimes called a 440 in yards. Then we run a 100 yard dash, but never a 300 foot dash.  With SAE, you are constantly switching bases: 12:1 for inches to feet, 3:1 for feet to yards, 5,280:1 for feet to miles. It's just silly.

Metric is logical and everything is base-10, 10 of one unit always equal 1 of the next unit up, 10mm = 1cm. But some units are less frequently used, so they go 1,000:1 as in meters to kilometers. 

Yes, the thing that interests me is tyre sizes, inches for the Dia and MM for the widths. So a 17" Dia X 180mm width by X % of width for the cross section. Go figure.

Ciao

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Yeah, tire and inner tube sizes are weird. Somehow most of the world got stuck with inches for wheel diameters - then went ahead with metric for width.

Some truck tires in the US are all inches, a 35x12.50R15 is a 35 inch (0.9 meter) tall tire that is 12 1/2 inches wide and fits a 15 inch rim. These don't specify the sidewall as a proportion, they give the total height of the tire.

@PJPR01 You're gonna need more than 400 Kelvin to melt the sugar on your Creme Brûlée and get that nice crusty top.

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I do love mixing the fractional with the metric along with the ephemeral  . . . :nerd:

> about 1/4 of a ml <

Temperature is another wildcard.  My chemist son specifies that coffee must be extracted from the beans in Celsius degrees (196ºC), yet is to be consumed in degrees Fahrenheit (165ºF).  :whistle:

And volumetric measure? A "fifth" is not 1/5 of anything! :drink: And while "1 cup" = ~ 200 ml, I still can't think of anything in Base 8 . . . :wacko:

Even "8-Ball" (the pool table game) is in Base 7 + 1 (seven stripes, seven solids + the Eight Ball).  :blink:

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I need to sit down with a beer to consider the wisdom shown in this thread.

But should I measure the beer in milliliters, pints, fluid ounces, or British standard bathtubs? (I just made that last one up).

 The V11 fuel tank holds about 1/64 BSBs. 

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6 minutes ago, MartyNZ said:

I need to sit down with a beer to consider the wisdom shown in this thread.

But should I measure the beer in milliliters, pints, fluid ounces, or British standard bathtubs? (I just made that last one up).

 The V11 fuel tank holds about 1/64 BSBs. 

The mystery is revealed!

The V11 fuel tank is in Base 8!

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