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It occurred to me today...


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3 minutes ago, Scud said:

Docc - I seem to recall you being a bass player. Isn't musical notation in base 8? An octave is 8 steps, right?

 

1 minute ago, footgoose said:

I'm witnessing mass cabin fever.

ooooh, I am so busted reaching for too many wrenches. And throttles. And levers.  And not enough strings.

It occurred to me that I play some "eight to the bar" blues, but thought that ended up being Base 12.

No wonder the drummer scowls at me sometimes . . . :huh:

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19 minutes ago, Scud said:

Docc - I seem to recall you being a bass player. Isn't musical notation in base 8? An octave is 8 steps, right?

Winner!!  😅😅

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7 minutes ago, PJPR01 said:

Winner!!

Oh, wait, music is way worse than thread pitch and shoe sizes.

Sure: base 8 for octaves. Then there is "time" - 4:4. 3:4? 5:7? Change-ups?

I remember another musician saying, "It's just A-B-C-D-E-F-G"

Yeah, yeah. But NEVER in that order. And there is the the >time signature< and the change-ups and the keys, and chord progressions.

No wonder the drummer sometimes scowls at me. <_<

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Major and minor keys

Flats and sharps

Adaggios and crescendos and Piano piano

I used to find playing 6/8 time much harder than 3/4…who knows why, mathematically they are identical!

and scales…so many scales to practice over and over!  
 

Years of playing French horn in my youth….ah the torture sessions in Orchestra and Band with the conductor…good times!!

 

Who was it who said something to the effect of “A good blues player is not one who knows which notes to play, it’s someone who knows which notes not to play!”

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13 hours ago, Scud said:

Docc - I seem to recall you being a bass player. Isn't musical notation in base 8? An octave is 8 steps, right?

In music, they say an "interval" is the distance between two notes. The smallest interval in Western music is the half step, the largest the whole step.

Here is Texas, we prefer to use  the "two steps".

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On 8/2/2021 at 7:37 PM, docc said:

There you go. Then we gets-us some Moto Goozies and try to play in 9/11 time . . . :luigi:  ;)

IMG_3208.JPG

I remain surprised at the number of odd-sized and oddly-designed fasteners I encounter. I realize that there is a reason for each of them, but it has been said that we cannot avoid using reason - we can only avoid using it well. The Japanese are known for sizing the fastener to the task, while the Germans are known to employ the fewest sizes so as to simplify design, supply and manufacture. In the north of Italy, it seems that the fasteners are produced in accordance with a national law which mandates that 7, 9 and 11mm fastener companies are kept in production. I think it was a post-WWII reconstruction thing. Or not.  

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17 hours ago, po18guy said:

I remain surprised at the number of odd-sized and oddly-designed fasteners I encounter. I realize that there is a reason for each of them, but it has been said that we cannot avoid using reason - we can only avoid using it well. The Japanese are known for sizing the fastener to the task, while the Germans are known to employ the fewest sizes so as to simplify design, supply and manufacture. In the north of Italy, it seems that the fasteners are produced in accordance with a national law which mandates that 7, 9 and 11mm fastener companies are kept in production. I think it was a post-WWII reconstruction thing. Or not.  

We could have a long conversation about fasteners.

In the 70's, the Japanese bikes that got in my hands were all equipped with "Philips" heads. This type of head is notorious for being prone to wear. So we replaced them all with hex drive fasteners. Back then, we could only get the non stainless ones. It still costed a little fortune.

There there is the usage of the washers. I was taught that a fastener would always sit atop a washer to distribute the torque on a larger surface, and a saver measure. For example, you would never install a split lock or tooth lock washers without a flat washer in between.

Last, there is the metallurgy of the fastener itself.

German steel always was the best. I have screws that broke as I was trying to tight them up using a torque wrench.

Today, we have even more solutions with heads, but socket remains the standard for motorbikes, I guess?

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We could have a long conversation about fasteners.
In the 70's, the Japanese bikes that got in my hands were all equipped with "Philips" heads. This type of head is notorious for being prone to wear. So we replaced them all with hex drive fasteners. Back then, we could only get the non stainless ones. It still costed a little fortune.
There there is the usage of the washers. I was taught that a fastener would always sit atop a washer to distribute the torque on a larger surface, and a saver measure. For example, you would never install a split lock or tooth lock washers without a flat washer in between.
Last, there is the metallurgy of the fastener itself.
German steel always was the best. I have screws that broke as I was trying to tight them up using a torque wrench.
Today, we have even more solutions with heads, but socket remains the standard for motorbikes, I guess?
They were JIS fasteners rather than Philips. What you needed was a JIS screwdriver and all would have been well.

Sent from my SM-G925F using Tapatalk

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4 hours ago, Paradiso said:

They were JIS fasteners rather than Philips. What you needed was a JIS screwdriver and all would have been well.

Sent from my SM-G925F using Tapatalk
 

Thanks to you, I found the description of all head drives and the JIS B 1012.

I am pretty certain that I was certainly impossible for me to find the appropriate tool for a JIS B 1012 cruciform head. Hence, the reason why we exchanged them all with hex socket heads.

Anyway, I was totally unaware the Japanese had their own standard, but why not....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_screw_drives#JIS_B_1012

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1 hour ago, fotoguzzi said:

Fasteners on a Guzzi are nothing, try doing a belt change on a Buell.. I seem to remember at least 13 different tools to do the job.

IMG_2315_zpsee38fd9b-600x400.jpg

 

Finally! A bike which makes working on a Guzzi only "moderately difficult" in comparison. I remember Erik Buell being quoted as saying that there was "some insane geometry" at work in the Buell belt tensioning roller.

As to the JIS, the screwheads of 1960s Japanese bikes were really soft by today's standards. As to today's fasteners, I rather like the Torx ("star") drive as it is a more efficient means of generating rotational torque than the socket head.

Socket head wrenches, as force is applied, try to expand the bolt head outward as much as they try to rotate the bolt. Thanks to molecular bonds and steel alloys, this almost always works. Torx, on the other hand, has the splined connection which transfers the load more effectively, being more axial than radial. Can you imagine if the transmission input, output and final drive shafts were hex socket? 

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1 hour ago, po18guy said:

Can you imagine if the transmission input, output and final drive shafts were hex socket? 

splines and hex sockets (torx) have a lot in common.

I can imagine a Guzzi with a belt drive. Shave maybe 30lb and have little to no maintenance. :wub:

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Just now, footgoose said:

splines and hex sockets (torx) have a lot in common.

I can imagine a Guzzi with a belt drive. Shave maybe 30lb and have little to no maintenance. :wub:

That will never work. Everyone knows we're suspender people . . . *snap*  :oldgit: *snap*

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