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Life after knee replacement.


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I am now at day fifteen after a left knee replacement due to arthritis, once healed expect to get the other one done.  I am starting to get dark thoughts about my ability to continue to ride the V11 once fully healed in perhaps a year to eighteen months time.  How have others got on with this one, I will admit I was becoming nervous riding the bike in the last few months before surgery due to worry my arthritic knee may collapse at any time as the V11 is a little wide and top heavy.  I am 69, reasonably fit and do like to ride.

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I can't speak to the knee surgery but can speak to the dark thoughts of an ageing motorcyclist. I'm 71 and in great shape...for 71:wacko: and it's a lot harder to move the bikes around in the shop than it used to be. The V11 is the easiest to maneuver among my five bikes because it carries it's weight low, but I don't think I could pick it up from a fall over. At some point we all have to consider the possibility of diminished abilities. Motorcycling is very important to me, and my simple plan is to not acquire any more bikes at or near 500 pounds. The Tenni will be my last big bike. It is very easy for me to ride her now and I hope I can for a very long time. I can't imagine ever getting rid of her. Arthritis in the left hand makes clutching painful with some bikes, but not the Tennis' lightened setup. I have a lightweight DR650 that will be there for me if-when I get too decrepit.

I've also had the inspiration from several riding buddies over the years whom I've watched deal with some serious sht and managed to persevere with two wheels (well, Bill's foot was torn off in a crash and he finally got a 3 wheeler). Mark is 78 and with knee pain rides a Bergman with a home-made seat, and it's amazing how fast he rides.

 

 

 

 

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I've been staving off aches and pains (shoulders, knees, hip, hands, Achilles) for the last few years by keeping up with my physical therapy.  Whenever I get a new muscle or joint pain, I'll get a referral to therapist and then make sure I include that into my regular exercise routines.   I've heard that for knees that it makes sense to do preop and postop PT.

I recently started getting slight "twitches" in my right hip.  After x-rays and an MRI, I found I had a 1 inch bone chip and muscle tear from an old injury.  So sometime ago I broke my hip.

I wish you the best.  I wouldn't give up right away.  Do your best to work through it and build new strength.  For sure your new knees will be better and less painful than your old ones. 

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After knee surgery in 1994 or thereabouts, I had to re-learn trusting my knee. After finishing PT and some time of cautious use, one day, it no longer hurt to squat down. Very fortunately, it has been fine ever since. As we age, it is both normal and healthy to ponder our abilities and to self-critique if possible. At 69, I am otherwise a train wreck. Currently nursing  my right ankle, which was sprained and now has plantar fasciitis. More present in my thoughts is the osteoporosis, and the diabetic/chemo-induced neuropathy from cancer treatment and immune suppression. Being clumsy by nature, I am more graceful riding than walking. I am riding for now, but as it is with life itself, I know the end is eventually coming. The key is fighting it rather than denying it.

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4 hours ago, footgoose said:

I can't speak to the knee surgery but can speak to the dark thoughts of an ageing motorcyclist. I'm 71 and in great shape...for 71:wacko: and it's a lot harder to move the bikes around in the shop than it used to be. The V11 is the easiest to maneuver among my five bikes because it carries it's weight low, but I don't think I could pick it up from a fall over. At some point we all have to consider the possibility of diminished abilities. Motorcycling is very important to me, and my simple plan is to not acquire any more bikes at or near 500 pounds. The Tenni will be my last big bike. It is very easy for me to ride her now and I hope I can for a very long time. I can't imagine ever getting rid of her. Arthritis in the left hand makes clutching painful with some bikes, but not the Tennis' lightened setup. I have a lightweight DR650 that will be there for me if-when I get too decrepit.

I've also had the inspiration from several riding buddies over the years whom I've watched deal with some serious sht and managed to persevere with two wheels (well, Bill's foot was torn off in a crash and he finally got a 3 wheeler). Mark is 78 and with knee pain rides a Bergman with a home-made seat, and it's amazing how fast he rides.

 

I know you couldn't pick it up and neither could I, not a chance in hell. Even a fit 35 year old would be struggling. It's an initial lift of over 200kgs. Worth thinking about if you're on your own at anytime even in the workshop. I haven't nonchalantly manoeuvred a bike around since my Speed Triple fell over in the garage 25 years ago. I felt it was starting to get away from me and managed to lessen the impact on it as it went down so no damage but getting that back up was almost impossible on my own and I was a fit 38 year old then. Since then I focus a lot wheeling a bike around because if it goes over that's where it's staying until I can get help to get it up again.

Ciao   

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Well heck if the standard is picking up a 500lb+ bike, then I'll get some help.  We can save it for the individual competition for next Festivus Feat's of Strength.  

So far as dropping it when I move the bike around, I like to straddle it the kickstand down.  Careful not scrape it up when pushing it around but fairly easy to the stand down again when straddling it.  I've noticed that taller folks have a little more leverage and push a bike around easier.  I say it's all technique based on your size and perhaps strength.  

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Quite right about a tipped over V11. Last time I surprised myself by dirt riding on a street bike, I ended up with my right boot pinned under the right muffler as it leaned 45º against an embankment. Riding at night with cataracts - now gone. Was only a 400 pound bike (180 Kg or so) and only halfway over, but my collarbone, shoulder and several ribs were broken. So, I waited until a fellow noticed me and helped lift the bike. A short but memorable ride home. Wife examined me, found where I was not injured and promptly kicked me there.

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Strong will, and mountain riding keeps me going. 26 years with water well drilling, what can be expected . Changed the whole U-joint left shoulder, right side long overdue, and and... 3.5day in hospital  :rasta:, out riding after 19days. 68C have faith, you be ok.

Had the  1100 Sport on the lift with the Becker Tecnik stand, standing in front of the bike, pulling front wheel to get her seated in the front wheel stand. Slow motion I see her roll of the Becker and slowly hit the floor. Bet I had a face long as a horse. Adrenalin and,, she was back up on her feet in seconds, no damage. Let's say I suprised myself and a few other. My soft tiles were helpful.     5 years ago, don't know about today, soon 68.  I'm out.

Cheers Tom. 

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2 hours ago, LowRyter said:

Well heck if the standard is picking up a 500lb+ bike, then I'll get some help.  We can save it for the individual competition for next Festivus Feat's of Strength.  

So far as dropping it when I move the bike around, I like to straddle it the kickstand down.  Careful not scrape it up when pushing it around but fairly easy to the stand down again when straddling it.  I've noticed that taller folks have a little more leverage and push a bike around easier.  I say it's all technique based on your size and perhaps strength.  

I have been thinking about an accessory right sidestand. Then, it could only steam roller me when I fall.

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Thanks for all the encouragement, stuck within this body so just have to make the best of it.  At least it is wet and cold outside so not missing much I suppose.

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3 minutes ago, 68C said:

Thanks for all the encouragement, stuck within this body so just have to make the best of it.  At least it is wet and cold outside so not missing much I suppose.

We must be on similar latitudes, as the rain is falling here as well. Having had two lumbar spine surgeries as well as the right knee, I know that the recovery period is one of the most down times for a rider. Yet, will come the day that inflammation releases its grasp on that last nerve and you once again have confidence. Have a bicycle? That is my other two-wheeled activity which keeps me in some semblance of shape for the motorized kind.

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It would be easy to tell you to never give up.

I am four years younger than you are, and I had to give up on something I have done for a good part of my life because of a decaying ability.

I think it comes down to how at ease you will be when you try to ride again, and how safe you will feel when you are on the motorbike.

As long as you still experience the good vibrations, then don't look at the rest.

 

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