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100 Years: Guzzi Documentary (English)...


VtwinStorm
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Puts a smile on my face. ^_^

While the V11 Sport/LeMans is, as usual, unrepresented, the Spine Frame is seen in the Dr.John Daytona. Fair enough! That was, after all, the genesis of our beloved V11. :mg:

A couple high points . . .

" . . . a beautiful madness."

" . . . una bella follia."

Screen Shot 2021-12-30 at 6.10.45 PM.png

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What strikes me the most in this documentary, is that a motorcyclist who gets a Guzzi is special for specific reasons.

Why did you purchase a Guzzi, but more importantly, why a V11 in the first place. I know that not everyone on this forum owns or rides a V11; still, it is the rallying call of this site.

We all our reasons, but some of those describes in the video resonates strongly with me. They may belong in the previous generations behavior.

Today's world is so different in so many aspects. I had the opportunity to be a witness of many of the changes. I noticed that I enjoy the raw pleasures that were those available to me several decades ago. My association with joy remained unabashed throughout the years.

I wonder what the newer generations will enjoy doing tomorrow? riding a V11 or getting therapy?

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On 1/2/2022 at 11:37 AM, p6x said:

What strikes me the most in this documentary, is that a motorcyclist who gets a Guzzi is special for specific reasons.

Why did you purchase a Guzzi, but more importantly, why a V11 in the first place. I know that not everyone on this forum owns or rides a V11; still, it is the rallying call of this site.

We all our reasons, but some of those describes in the video resonates strongly with me. They may belong in the previous generations behavior.

Today's world is so different in so many aspects. I had the opportunity to be a witness of many of the changes. I noticed that I enjoy the raw pleasures that were those available to me several decades ago. My association with joy remained unabashed throughout the years.

I wonder what the newer generations will enjoy doing tomorrow? riding a V11 or getting therapy?

I enjoy riding a V11 because honestly, motorcycles are my therapy.

Tough day at work? Feeling down? Lonely? Just plain bored? Ride a motorcycle.

It kind of happend to coincide with Guzzi's 100th Anniversary that I began thinking about a Guzzi, but I wanted one that was not a cruiser, but more sporty, and with the big block engine. I always admired the V11 Sport/LeMans from afar. I saw a mint champagne LeMans  with 6k on the clock on my local CL, and I started thinking...The price was absurdly high, but it started me down a rabbit hole of reading about the V11-series, and finding V11LeMans.com, and my search began in earnest.

I would say, from beginning to end, my search and acquisition of my clean black redframe V11 Sport took less than four months. I thought I would have to wait a year.

I cannot wait for the return of Spring so I can ride her again. Amazing machine.

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I sat on the black frame burgundy that I now own at a motorcycle show in Indianapolis, and was enchanted enough to stay in touch with the small "dealer" in a small town north of mine. I made monetary rationalizations and negotiations and bought it. The feedback from riding was unlike anything else I'd ridden and since it isn't the easiest machine to ride, it keeps one's attention more active in my opinion. Mountain roads in Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, etc. sealed the affection. Then the dreaded electrical gremlins came, and it sat languishing for several years in the garage. A crash ( obviously on a different bike) left me grounded and slightly spooked for a couple years. When I got the desire to return to riding back, no mechanic would touch it without a suitcase full of unmarked bills and Methuselah's scheduling. Somewhere I heard the phrase "If it's going to get f***ed up you might as well do it instead of paying for someone else to. "  Around that same time I remembered this forum and was encouraged. The first startup after relay exchanges and the "decent tune up " brought tears to my eyes, and I thank you all...

 

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1 minute ago, billgreenman1 said:

I sat on the black frame burgundy that I now own at a motorcycle show in Indianapolis, and was enchanted enough to stay in touch with the small "dealer" in a small town north of mine. I made monetary rationalizations and negotiations and bought it. The feedback from riding was unlike anything else I'd ridden and since it isn't the easiest machine to ride, it keeps one's attention more active in my opinion. Mountain roads in Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, etc. sealed the affection. Then the dreaded electrical gremlins came, and it sat languishing for several years in the garage. A crash ( obviously on a different bike) left me grounded and slightly spooked for a couple years. When I got the desire to return to riding back, no mechanic would touch it without a suitcase full of unmarked bills and Methuselah's scheduling. Somewhere I heard the phrase "If it's going to get f***ed up you might as well do it instead of paying for someone else to. "  Around that same time I remembered this forum and was encouraged. The first startup after relay exchanges and the "decent tune up " brought tears to my eyes, and I thank you all...

 

Awesome, my man!

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4 hours ago, billgreenman1 said:

Somewhere I heard the phrase "If it's going to get f***ed up you might as well do it instead of paying for someone else to. "  Around that same time I remembered this forum and was encouraged. The first startup after relay exchanges and the "decent tune up " brought tears to my eyes, and I thank you all...

 

I'm not sure that is our mantra here, but I'm not sure that it isn't . . .  B):luigi:  :bier:

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20 hours ago, VtwinStorm said:

I enjoy riding a V11 because honestly, motorcycles are my therapy.

Is riding a Guzzi, a V11 inherently different though? what makes a Guzzi special to you? is it just another motorcycle, or do you feel different?

Guzzi says you are not the same when on a Guzzi. Is this a valid point?

What criterion/criteria made you pick one, and a V11 in particular?

Back in the times when I was in my good years, we identified with bikes according to their engine architectures. Such as the Kawasaki/Suzuki triples, the legendary Honda CB 750 four in line. The BMW only came with the flat twin, the British bikes where parallels, the Guzzi with the transverse V twin and Ducati with its L engine.

Today, the Guzzi seems to have remained more or less the same. Ducati too, even if they have added two more cylinders and moved from the distribution they are so famous for.

What is it then?

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12 minutes ago, p6x said:

Is riding a Guzzi, a V11 inherently different though? what makes a Guzzi special to you? is it just another motorcycle, or do you feel different?

Guzzi says you are not the same when on a Guzzi. Is this a valid point?

What criterion/criteria made you pick one, and a V11 in particular?

Back in the times when I was in my good years, we identified with bikes according to their engine architectures. Such as the Kawasaki/Suzuki triples, the legendary Honda CB 750 four in line. The BMW only came with the flat twin, the British bikes where parallels, the Guzzi with the transverse V twin and Ducati with its L engine.

Today, the Guzzi seems to have remained more or less the same. Ducati too, even if they have added two more cylinders and moved from the distribution they are so famous for.

What is it then?

Well, I bought a V11 entirely on faith. I didn't want the clunky 5 speed, nor dropping the oil pan to change the oil filter (stupid design, IMO), and more sporty style. I also wanted a big block engine. V11 was really my only choice for a Guzzi. It was a V11 Sport or a LeMans. I ignored the Eldorado, Bellagio, all the V7s, V50, V65, 850/1000 LeMans (too pricey and slow for me). I wasn't interested in anything else for $6k or less.

I've only test-ridden a V7 Stone, and came away very unimpressed. Engine was breathless, gearbox clunky, the machine rode like trash and it had less than 100 miles on it.

I overlooked this, and wanted to add a big block Guzzi to my collection.

I chose a Guzzi because they did things differently. That engine with the two cylinders sticking out, the shaft drive, separate gearbox, tube frame, it all was so cool to me. The 100th Anniversary was coming up so the timing kind of made sense, so I said "Why not?"

The V11 I bought and shipped to me didn't disappoint. It is an incredible machine, which oozes a certain quiet confident charisma. I think only air-cooled Ducatis do it better.

I have big plans for my V11 Sport in 2022...lots of miles in the NH White Mountains! Lots of twisties, and perhaps a trip to Laconia Bike Week to spend time with toothless, special needs riders. :lol:

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19 hours ago, billgreenman1 said:

Somewhere I heard the phrase "If it's going to get f***ed up you might as well do it instead of paying for someone else to. "

My issue is: can you trust the workshop to do the work as carefully as you would expect it to be?

I am always referencing to the past, mainly because this is where my experience lays for the most part. In the 1970's, when you brought your motorcycle to the shop, you could speak to the guy that would actually work on it. Not to a "Service Manager". There were no "signature required". The guy would treat your bike as he would his. At pickup time you get a run down of what was accomplished, eventual troubles and suggestions. Not a rubber stamped check list.

With MPH Guzzi here in Houston, I would say that we are privileged. The shop has a proven history in Guzzi bikes, and the current mechanic that works on your bike is accessible. After I got the Le Mans last year, this was my first stop for a full assessment. The bike was healthy excepted for the odometer disease common to the V11s, so far, so good.

My V11 is afflicted with the common hiccups reported in the technical pages here: I have purchased all the necessary equipment to verify the setup. I have a cranking problem, which I have not yet resolved, but I am confident I have identified the problem.

My main concern is space. I do not have any space to work on the bike other than doing menial tasks.

My plan was to sell my car and purchase a SMART for two; even I ran all my errands with the Le Mans, there are times when I need to be able to have a bit more cargo space. Due to the chip shortage, the used car prices have gone unacceptable; It does not make sense to purchase a car that used to cost 6K for 15k or more today.

I will wait, or if push comes to shove, I will go MPH.

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9 hours ago, p6x said:

My issue is: can you trust the workshop to do the work as carefully as you would expect it to be?

I am always referencing to the past, mainly because this is where my experience lays for the most part. In the 1970's, when you brought your motorcycle to the shop, you could speak to the guy that would actually work on it. Not to a "Service Manager". There were no "signature required". The guy would treat your bike as he would his. At pickup time you get a run down of what was accomplished, eventual troubles and suggestions. Not a rubber stamped check list.

With MPH Guzzi here in Houston, I would say that we are privileged. The shop has a proven history in Guzzi bikes, and the current mechanic that works on your bike is accessible. After I got the Le Mans last year, this was my first stop for a full assessment. The bike was healthy excepted for the odometer disease common to the V11s, so far, so good.

My V11 is afflicted with the common hiccups reported in the technical pages here: I have purchased all the necessary equipment to verify the setup. I have a cranking problem, which I have not yet resolved, but I am confident I have identified the problem.

My main concern is space. I do not have any space to work on the bike other than doing menial tasks.

My plan was to sell my car and purchase a SMART for two; even I ran all my errands with the Le Mans, there are times when I need to be able to have a bit more cargo space. Due to the chip shortage, the used car prices have gone unacceptable; It does not make sense to purchase a car that used to cost 6K for 15k or more today.

I will wait, or if push comes to shove, I will go MPH.

It is definitely a blessing to have a a shop with a reputable "Guzzi whisperer". I'm not so sure I'd rely on the  V11 as day to day transport and luggage options are also a bit constrained. To each their own though! I still have a 4-wheeled box complete with windshield wipers and a heater, and a BMW r1150r as a daily summer mule. But the V11 stirs the soul differently. I've got the semi rare and slightly goofy stock tank bag and some Ortlieb panniers and have toured, but it is kinda like bungee-ing a milk crate onto a Lamborghini......

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11 hours ago, p6x said:

My plan was to sell my car and purchase a SMART 

Interesting garage-fellows, a SMART and a V11....

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