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125,000 mile Tune-up Report - lessons learned


docc
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A week ago I posted concerns about replacing my original fuel pump at 125,000 miles/ 201.000 km. Turned out that restart stumbling was a fluke, perhaps a bit of "vapor lock." Has not recurred, so I moved on the my 5,000 mile/8.000 km oil change/ tune-up interval. Some observations:

> I use the filter access cover to change the filter. Last change was the only time I found the filter stuck. This time I LIBERALLY oiled the gasket, both the surface and the sides. I remembered to inspect the old filter to be sure it brought its gasket out with it and also shone a light up into the sump with a mirror to be doubly certain no old gasket remained in the engine. I did not remember to peel the WIX sticker off the filter, but have run the label before with no issues. I prefer to remove them. "One less thing," you know.

> The Sport ran so great yesterday, I was mildly surprised the spark plugs looked so awful. The gap had opened from 0.0275" to ~0.033. One side of the plugs showed a nice coloration and the other side (especially the right) was all crusted with carbon deposits. I'm thinking signs of needy valve seals/ guides.

> I've been concerned my valves are sinking into the heads, especially the left exhaust. Pleasantly surprised that I relaxed the right side I/E maybe 0.0005"/0.0127mm just to get a nice, loose slide on the feeler gauge blade. I found the left side both at 0.007"/ 0.018mm, so slacked the exhaust a thousandth and snugged the intake a thousandth of an inch. Very pleased.

> My TPS had drifted from 157mV to ~134mV. For the first time, I purposefully held the throttle firmly closed to set the TPS.  This looked to make about a 10mV difference. I feel like I should be indexed to the map better.  :notworthy:  Thanks to all of those who have patiently helped me understand this importance. 

> I have been skipping the Decent Tune-up step of removing and cleaning the air bypass screws/circuit. Not sure the last time I did that, but the tips of the air screws weren't just sooty, but crusty and a lot of black gook and particle washed back out of the passageways with throttle body cleaner spray applied repeatedly until the wash-back looked clean. Again, pretty sure my old Sport is burning its share of oil via the valve seals, but I won't skip that step again.

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Out for a warm-up ride to balance the throttle bodies and, five miles from home, she coughs hard - sputters- picks up again- coughs - sputters- barely runs or idles as I nurse her in to a safe spot. She dies, making me think about that fuel pump again. Off the bike, I retrace everything I just had my hands on. There it is: I had left the TPS break-out harness connected and the bare leads had wandered their way to ground. Detached it, plugged the TPS in directly and motored happily away. Note to self:

> After setting the TPS and removing the voltmeter, see that the break-out harness is removed and TPS is plugged back in directly. :huh:

~ ~ ~ " I won't skip that step again. " ~ ~ ~

:rolleyes:

 

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Oh, and next valve adjustment (130,000 miles/ 209.000 km), I really should replace the original valve cover gaskets. Get-me some o' those hi-zoot Valpolini . . . B)

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Frankly, the hardest thing about adjusting the valves is removing and replacing the alternator cover to rotate the motor to TDC "destra e sinistra ." Be aware that this operation is what strains the yellow stator output wires.

Yet, this is the time to refresh our alternator cover that skims the road behind the front tire. The weather wasn't right for a clear coat, so just scrubbed it and a good coat of Carnauba wax . . .

IMG_7265.jpg 

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4 hours ago, docc said:

Frankly, the hardest thing about adjusting the valves is removing and replacing the alternator cover to rotate the motor to TDC "destra e sinistra ." Be aware that this operation is what strains the yellow stator output wires.

Yet, this is the time to refresh our alternator cover that skims the road behind the front tire. The weather wasn't right for a clear coat, so just scrubbed it and a good coat of Carnauba wax . . .

IMG_7265.jpg 

You can always just put it in gear and rotate the engine docc.

Ciao

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6 hours ago, Lucky Phil said:

You can always just put it in gear and rotate the engine docc.

Ciao

I've tried that and it is very awkward for me. I could never figure out how to keep an eye on the flywheel marks or control the motor position very accurately.

My alternator cove access is also complicated by my FIAMM horns. But I'm not giving those bad boys up!

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1 hour ago, docc said:

I've tried that and it is very awkward for me. I could never figure out how to keep an eye on the flywheel marks or control the motor position very accurately.

My alternator cove access is also complicated by my FIAMM horns. But I'm not giving those bad boys up!

I put my rear wheel up on the Pit Bull stand, pull the spark plugs and rotate the wheel with a finger on the hole; when it comes to compression, you can get close to TDC by finger. Then I use a round-bodied flat blade screwdriver to turn the flywheel tooth at a time to find the marks.
6 speed has the same flywheel hole as a 5 speed, yes?

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Yeah, I use the rear wheel method to get to TDC otherwise I have to remove the header pipes (because of crossover) to remove the stator cover to access the crank nut.

Speaking of stator covers, I've got mine off right now because I'm in the middle of replacing the stator.  Anyway, the battleship flat gray paint on the cover was chipped & bubbling so I removed all the paint and primed it with rustoleum self etching primer and plan on topping it with VHT Wheel paint (polyurethane).  I honestly don't know what I'm doing especially when it comes to paint so feel free to advise!  I never liked the gray the was on the cover but didn't have any success finding something similar so I went with VHT's sp188 ford argent silver.  Whatta ya's think?  One isn't compatible with the other ?:wacko:

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20 hours ago, guzziart said:

Yeah, I use the rear wheel method to get to TDC otherwise I have to remove the header pipes (because of crossover) to remove the stator cover to access the crank nut.

Speaking of stator covers, I've got mine off right now because I'm in the middle of replacing the stator.  Anyway, the battleship flat gray paint on the cover was chipped & bubbling so I removed all the paint and primed it with rustoleum self etching primer and plan on topping it with VHT Wheel paint (polyurethane).  I honestly don't know what I'm doing especially when it comes to paint so feel free to advise!  I never liked the gray the was on the cover but didn't have any success finding something similar so I went with VHT's sp188 ford argent silver.  Whatta ya's think?  One isn't compatible with the other ?:wacko:

My (limited) experience with paint is that if you use Rust-Oleum primer, use R-O topcoat. Many times over the years I couldn't figure how my topcoat fisheyed or peeled, until someone told me that RO use fish oil or something for their rust preventative, and other paint doesn't like it. I would use a urethane if they have it, given the ding factor of road dirt. My first rule for painting (and I do hate painting) is to let the part warm in the sun, even to the point of being uncomfortable to hold. That outgasses the pores in the part of water and oils, evaporates the carrier more quickly, allows for the cooling action of the evaporation to pull the paint back into the pores and give you great adhesion. Also you can apply a heavier coat, and second coat, much more quickly without runs. And if you like wrinkle, a hot part is the whole answer (a H-D trade secret lol)

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On 4/17/2022 at 3:12 PM, docc said:

> I use the filter access cover to change the filter.

docc, how often, or per X # oil changes, do you drop the sump pan?
 

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42 minutes ago, Kane said:

docc, how often, or per X # oil changes, do you drop the sump pan?
 

I've had it off twice.  Last time to replace the original gasket chasing oil leaks (it wasn't one of the leaks). Neither time did I find anything to address. No accumulations of anything, no clogging or obstruction of the pick-up screen.  Maybe if a V11 is stored in a wet environment, sitting for months and months at a time, or the oil doesn't get changed at least once a year then the sump drop would be more important (?) :huh2:

I would say that last sump-drop stripped a bolt hole. So, perhaps removing those how-ever-many bolts more often would be good. The again, perhaps not.  :mellow:

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16 minutes ago, docc said:

I've had it off twice.  Last time to replace the original gasket chasing oil leaks (it wasn't one of the leaks). Neither time did I find anything to address. No accumulations of anything, no clogging or obstruction of the pick-up screen.  Maybe if a V11 is stored in a wet environment, sitting for months and months at a time, or the oil doesn't get changed at least once a year then the sump drop would be more important (?) :huh2:

I would say that last sump-drop stripped a bolt hole. So, perhaps removing those how-ever-many bolts more often would be good. The again, perhaps not.  :mellow:

I've had mine off twice, once when purchased and once to install my Roper Plate. Neither time I saw anything of note, and I'll not take it off ever again without specific reason. The threads are a particular concern, and the Roper Plate causes you to lose 1/4 of the threads you had so care is warranted. Any engine block I have upside down will get all the pan holes Timeserted.

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I have only taken the sump off once prior to now, where the sump is off to install a Roper plate. But I am surprised that so many people never take the sump off. I thought it was more popular to use a hose clamp on the oil filter to keep it from loosening. And that seems to require sump removal. I have yet to have an issue with the oil filter, but I can see how it could be an issue. Normally a loose oil filter would show a leak but on the V11 it would simply leak back into the sump. Develop enough of a leak and you don't have sufficient oil pressure. But I have been lucky so far and not had a leak there.

On a side note, I wonder if the modern CARC sump from a Griso 1100 would fit on a V11 block. It might need both the sump and the sump spacer. Or it might be completely different. It has a cut out in it for the oil filter, instead of putting the oil filter in the sump. A better design in my opinion.

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