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Early Sport fork seals


docc
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2 hours ago, docc said:

My seal leak is "better" but not acceptable. MySport has the early 40mm Marzocchi. MotionPro only lists 39mm and 41mm seal drivers. Can I use the 41?

https://www.motionpro.com/product/08-0489

073213f866e4695e5381635c4ece2f6ad498892f

I would think you could go with the 41mm kit . 41mm is 0.039 in larger than 40mm . 

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2 hours ago, docc said:

Yeah, I keep seeing 40-41mm seal drivers applicable to my 40mm fork seals.

Truth?

Docc reading the manual for the early forks it appears you can get away without having a seal driver. Unlike the later forks you can remove the inner slider without disturbing the bushes or the oil seal. The later forks are more like modern forks where the upper fork bush is retained on the end of the slider and so to disassemble the slider from the stanchion you need to use the slider like a slide hammer because the upper bush retained on the slider won't allow removal unless the lower bush and seal which is retained in the stanchion is out of the way. So the upper bush acts like a shoulder to push out the lower bush and seal. The early forks retain both the upper and lower bushers as well as the seals in the stanchion with the bushes separated by a sleeve. So you undo the fork cap and nut and slide the slider out of the stanchion and the bushes and seals stay in place. This means you can replace the seals in the stanchion and then fit the slider back in so all you need is the correct dia drift such as a piece of PVC of the correct dia as someone mentioned because you dont have the slider in the way. The later forks you must fit the dust seal, the oil seal the retaining clip and spacer and lower bush and upper bush all onto the slider in the correct order then insert the slider and upper bush into the stanchion and then use the instillation tool to hammer first the lower bush into the stanchion followed  by the oil seal then fit the seal retaining clip and finally push the dust seal into place then split the tool to remove it from the slider. This is why the later modern design forks need the sliding hammer seal and lower bush instillation tool and the earlier forks almost certainly don't and you can get away with a simple home made sleeve of the correct OD to just tap the seal into place. At your mileage I would check the bushes for wear though as well. The bushes in the later forks are DU style coated bushes so check the teflon like grey coating hasn't worn away to the base metal. New bushes aren't that expensive. 

Ciao

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20 hours ago, Lucky Phil said:

 At your mileage I would check the bushes for wear though as well. The bushes in the later forks are DU style coated bushes so check the teflon like grey coating hasn't worn away to the base metal. New bushes aren't that expensive. 

Ciao

 Thanks for the detailed difference between the early and later V11 forks. What are "DU style coated bushes?"

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8 hours ago, docc said:

 Thanks for the detailed difference between the early and later V11 forks. What are "DU style coated bushes?"

Steel bushes often split style with various coatings. I used them for the throttle body bush repairs and are the std fitment from Weber. The fork bushes are the same.

  http://www.thyssing.com.au/products/glacier-garlock-bearings-ggb-bearings/du-bush/

 

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On 5/27/2022 at 10:48 PM, andy york said:

you need something with 52 mm od

my old forks are 40mm

might need to go to the hardware store and measure some PVC pipe

I have a heavy 3/4” drive socket that is 50mm OD that looks to be a good fit. I recently used it to set the front wheel bearings and they are 52mm.

I’ll get a look at the “DU style” bushes, as well, but likely won’t change them out this go-round unless they are awful. ( and they well could be . . .)

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6 hours ago, docc said:

I have a heavy 3/4” drive socket that is 50mm OD that looks to be a good fit. I recently used it to set the front wheel bearings and they are 52mm.

I’ll get a look at the “DU style” bushes, as well, but likely won’t change them out this go-round unless they are awful. ( and they well could be . . .)

Better to source replacement fork bushes docc. Pyramid parts make them for the 43mm forks and they are somewhat standard to a degree. You may need to measure them up to source the size. The come in ID X width X thickness from memory. 

Ciao

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6 minutes ago, Lucky Phil said:

Better to source replacement fork bushes docc. Pyramid parts make them for the 43mm forks and they are somewhat standard to a degree. You may need to measure them up to source the size. The come in ID X width X thickness from memory. 

Ciao

Yeah, well, then I'll have to hire somebody to replace them. Pretty sure that is out of my pay grade. :blink:

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2 hours ago, docc said:

Yeah, well, then I'll have to hire somebody to replace them. Pretty sure that is out of my pay grade. :blink:

From the manual it is home doeable docc. No special tooling required. Page 34 of the shop manual.

 

 

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Thanks for the encouragement. Harpers shows the Guzzi part (that does not mean they have them) for $41US. Each. Ouch.

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7 hours ago, docc said:

Thanks for the encouragement. Harpers shows the Guzzi part (that does not mean they have them) for $41US. Each. Ouch.

I bought a full set (4) Pyramid parts bushes for my 43mm forks for around $50ua. These bushes are nothing special in the scheme of things and if the low friction coating has worn off them then you need to replace them or they will start tearing up the chrome sliders. The ones in my second hand 43mm forks were actually fine but I'm not sure how many miles were on them.   

Ciao

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1 hour ago, Lucky Phil said:

I bought a full set (4) Pyramid parts bushes for my 43mm forks for around $50ua. These bushes are nothing special in the scheme of things and if the low friction coating has worn off them then you need to replace them or they will start tearing up the chrome sliders. The ones in my second hand 43mm forks were actually fine but I'm not sure how many miles were on them.   

Ciao

Got to find an equivalent US supplier . . . 

These 'Zokes are "40mm", IIRC.

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A half-hour of web search turned up zero DU bushings in 43mm. Closest I can find is 45mm- but they are cheap. 

https://www.hydraulicszone.com/mdu-045x050x012.html

You might consider sourcing them from the WP service center, if they're not prohibitively expensive.

Pyramid parts ships to US, which is about $70 US if it's the same as things going the other direction. 

https://pyramid-parts.com/collections/fork-bushes

I'd suggest that 43mm is simply outside the industrial standards, and fork manufacturers have them made in quantity to suit. If that's the case, your sourcing is limited to motorcycle fork suppliers. <shrug> Doable, but again considering the price and convenience (less for you than me) I gave mine to the WP service guys. 

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I'm guessing the V11 forks changed to 43mm with the LongFrame in 2002?

Maybe no 43mm forks until 2003 . . .

The early V11 Sport forks are 40mm.

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