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Frozen Pan on my EV


LowRyter
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The only other issue I didn't mention, all of the fasteners were over tightened.  They were lipstick marked and my guess is they guy might've gotten his metric torque numbers confused with his SAE muscles.  I've had the pan off many times and never had the fasteners so tight.  I tried to remove it when the bike was stone cold.  Used a light mallet with no luck.  

So I filled with oil and reinstalled the bolts.  

I'm guessing it will take heat and maybe some high strength fishing line.  Or some other technique TBD.  

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I know I'm a painfully slow mechanic, and I have to learn or relearn just about everything I do, but there's a reason I don't trust my bike with shop mechanics.

With it stuck on so bad and the fastenings so tight and you can't see a colored sealant,,,,,

Just a wag, but the mechanic probably got shit once before, because a customer's bike came back with a leaking sump gasket; he's obviously gone overboard to make sure that didn't happen with yours, I bet he's got it sealed up tight with YamaBond or similar product.

Very lucky all your sump bolts weren't stripped

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  • 2 weeks later...

Bumping for any update.

I was sure betting on the heat treatment.

No news is not likely good news in this instance.  :(

Bill

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1 hour ago, Bill Hagan said:

Bumping for any update.

I was sure betting on the heat treatment.

No news is not likely good news in this instance.  :(

Bill

Don's agreed to fix it when the next oil change is due.  I don't expect to pay additional labor and if he totals the bike, he can own it.  He said that the former tech used gasket sealer.  I haven't a clue why the guy did that even if he didn't know anything about servicing Guzzis since there was never any adhesive on the surfaces in the first place.  Believe me, I'm damned pissed about it.

Ironically, I never had much problems with my Guzzis until I got some miles on them and relied on Don's shop.  Then gearbox cracked, voltage regulator, fuel pump, oil pump, timing chest, etc., etc.  So far my best ever experience for any motorcycle has been 24k miles on '17 Ducati, KNOCKING WOOD until my knuckles bleed.

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Well, my worst ever experience was a Ducati that I was afraid to ride farther than I was willing to walk. :rasta:

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15 hours ago, Chuck said:

Well, my worst ever experience was a Ducati that I was afraid to ride farther than I was willing to walk. :rasta:

Times have certainly changed.   The Duc is the only bike that I would take on an overnight ride now.   KNOCKING WOOD <again>

(I'm also on some Duc forums, there are some issues with new Ducs but nothing like I see on WG for 1400, 8v, V7, TT, etc., etc.  I'm not comparing my legacy bikes since they're old and have miles on them but the long term reliability for them has been a challenge.)

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3 hours ago, LowRyter said:

Times have certainly changed.   The Duc is the only bike that I would take on an overnight ride now.   KNOCKING WOOD <again>

(I'm also on some Duc forums, there are some issues with new Ducs but nothing like I see on WG for 1400, 8v, V7, TT, etc., etc.  I'm not comparing my legacy bikes since they're old and have miles on them but the long term reliability for them has been a challenge.)

My 'Sport came to me with a lot of problems, all peripheral but troublesome in the 'trailer' sense. Once I straightened it out, I had near 15k absolutely trouble-free miles. 

With very little warning, it seemed to have a cascade failure. Fuel pump relay, electrical connections, starter siezure, it would run fine for a while then I'd be crawling back home or trailering home every time I went out. What it took, was a serious and dedicated maintenance to everything I could get my hands on without opening the motor. A big tube of DeOxit, new Omron relays, a new starter motor, new battery, remake all the ground and charge connections, new powdercoat and tires on the wheels, fix the steering head bearing race issue. It seemed a neverending litany of aggravation. Like I had to rebuild and remanufacture the entire bike. I excused MG because they're 'Boutique' and 'tiny'. But the real truth, I came to realize, is that I put 5 times the miles on it of any other bike I owned without *any* maintenance. Over the course of 4 years, in all weather, and often parked outside 'usually' under cover, in South Florida temperatures and humidity. I spent a lot more time maintaining all my previous bikes more frequently without really thinking about it. This only became noticeable because it went so long asking for nothing. One of my bumper sticker mottos is "Don't take half measures". This is a fine example of how I came to that philosophy.

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As a previous poster mentioned, take a Stanley knife blade without the holder and carefully tap it into the joint. Pick a corner to start with and combine this with a soft faced hammer on the perimeter. I have used this technique a few times with success and no damage. I had to use it recently to get the oil pump off a BB engine. The aftermarket pump had the locating dowels a fraction off spec and the pump was impossible to get off in the normal fashion so it was the very careful Stanley blade method around the pump mounting perimeter. Took a good hour to get it off without and real damage to the case thankfully. The pump was also on but I won't be reusing that.

The problem you are having is much like trying to work against suction. Try pulling something sucked down away directly and it's impossible but work at a small section to break the vacuum and it's much easier, same here. Once you get a corner to release and then work along an edge to get that to release it becomes exponentially easier. It's not suction holding the sump on of course but the principle is much the same.

Phil

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23 hours ago, Chuck said:

Well, my worst ever experience was a Ducati that I was afraid to ride farther than I was willing to walk. :rasta:

God Chuck what did you do to the poor thing. In 40 years riding Ducati's I've never had one let me down on the road or track and come to think of it same with my friends that I rode with on Ducati's. We had a new clutch basket fail in a WSB race once. That bike did the same race with a head gasket leaking coolant into the cylinder as well which we knew about before the race but it was powering our rider to a 10 place finish when the clutch basket failed. Apart from cracking cases those 996 engines were pretty tough and reliable. Our 600 TT2 did all IOM practices and 2 races without missing a beat and onto the TT2 World Championships on the same engine. The 750 engine did cough back through the rear inlet and pop the carburettor off as our rider shut the throttle after crossing the finish line in the senior race but the race was over so that doesn't count. 

Phil

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3 hours ago, Lucky Phil said:

As a previous poster mentioned, take a Stanley knife blade without the holder and carefully tap it into the joint. Pick a corner to start with and combine this with a soft faced hammer on the perimeter. I have used this technique a few times with success and no damage. I had to use it recently to get the oil pump off a BB engine. The aftermarket pump had the locating dowels a fraction off spec and the pump was impossible to get off in the normal fashion so it was the very careful Stanley blade method around the pump mounting perimeter. Took a good hour to get it off without and real damage to the case thankfully. The pump was also on but I won't be reusing that.

The problem you are having is much like trying to work against suction. Try pulling something sucked down away directly and it's impossible but work at a small section to break the vacuum and it's much easier, same here. Once you get a corner to release and then work along an edge to get that to release it becomes exponentially easier. It's not suction holding the sump on of course but the principle is much the same.

Phil

Thanks Phil.   Appreciate the recommendation.  That makes more sense than fishing line (my only thought).  

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