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Help with 1100 sport


red lion
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Not a biggie to replace them although they can be quite tough to get off and on.

Don't need to remove the tank, but the way I've did it in the past is to pull the whole TB assembly back, so you may not have enough room without removing the airbox.

Then it's a bugger to try to get the TB assembly back on

Grease would help getting them off, personally I wouldn't use grease putting them back on as you don't want them to move and rely on the friction to hold them in place. You could use something that will evaporate over time to ease them on.

Just what I've done not saying it's the recommended method, lets see if others chime in

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The easiest way to re fit throttle bodies is to individually fit the manifolds to the throttle bodies with the new rubbers and than bolt the manifolds to the heads with the t/b's attached.

Ciao

 

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1 hour ago, Pressureangle said:

So who has the highest quality TB boots? I should probably replace mine also, though they're not leaking they are ugly.

The rubber intakes often show cracking that is inconsequential. Until it is . . .

IMG_5301.jpg

I got my last replacement boots from MgCycle. I don't know about "highest quality", but they weren't expensive and shipping is always fast and reasonable from them.

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Weegie  Said I may need to remove the airbox. How do you do that?   Lucky Phil, I'm sorry but I don't understand your post. Could you please explain how to replace the boots  again  Step By step, It sounds like a big job.

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Removing and replacing the complete throttle body assembly on a SpineFrame Guzzi is an "event."

Replacing the rubber boots? Not so much. Fussy? Yes.

Instead of taking the airbox out (!), release the clamps of the rearward rubber intakes from the back of the throttle bodies and push those rubber tubes out of the way into the airbox.

Yes, the actual intake rubbers are tight fitting, very short, and stiff. Warm your new ones with a heat gun. Nothing extreme, just pliable. I like Shin-Estu grease, but the best temporary (evaporates away) rubber assembly lube I have found it this P-80 Emulsion from "ipcol":

61rrJdp63UL._AC_SL1500_.jpg&f=1&nofb=1

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I believe Phil is referring to the intake manifolds that bolts onto the head, they are triangular and held by 3 cap screws.

You'd remove them, think you'll need to purchase or make gaskets for them.

Install the rubbers to the removed manifold, then install the TB assembly onto the other side of the intake rubbers.

After that offer the whole thing up to head and bolt the manifolds into place

Not sure if that explains it enough or not

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12 hours ago, Weegie said:

I believe Phil is referring to the intake manifolds that bolts onto the head, they are triangular and held by 3 cap screws.

You'd remove them, think you'll need to purchase or make gaskets for them.

Install the rubbers to the removed manifold, then install the TB assembly onto the other side of the intake rubbers.

After that offer the whole thing up to head and bolt the manifolds into place

Not sure if that explains it enough or not

True, that explains what LuckyPhil has suggested.

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What Lucky Phil means, is that if you take the manifolds off the heads you don't have to deal with the misalignment caused by the angles of the intakes from side to side. Slip the rubbers on, slip the manifolds in, bolt the manifolds back up last. There are probably gaskets for them, but I'd not be afraid to use Yamabond or equivalent.

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Docc,  You said to release clamps of the rearward rubber intakes from the back of the throttle bodies and push those rubber tubes out of the way into the airbox.     Then will the throttle bodies move back to make room to install the new rubbers?

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18 minutes ago, red lion said:

Docc,  You said to release clamps of the rearward rubber intakes from the back of the throttle bodies and push those rubber tubes out of the way into the airbox.     Then will the throttle bodies move back to make room to install the new rubbers?

Just enough. It's tight and fussy. Helps to have the bike on a lift with the throttle bodies at "working height."

Warming the rubber and using a rubber lubricant like that P-80 is really helpful.

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23 minutes ago, docc said:

It's tight and fussy.

yep. I used silicone spray and many cuss words to do mine. I did not remove any manifold but did make and use different size hardwood 'pry bars' for leverage. I've ordered some of that P-80 for future. Silicone seems to evaporate but also seems to embed somewhat. Don't know long term effects but I've used it for years on many carb boots and similar applications. "seems" to make rubber fresh.

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I have another question about the 1100 sport. One of my bikes has a hose connecting the vacuum port from the right cylinder to the left cylinder. The other bikes have a cap or a plug, no hose. Would connecting the to cylinders have a bad effect on how the bike runs?

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