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ANSWERED Post a pic of your V11 - No words

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2 hours ago, footgoose said:

on a side note. How does one accurately weigh a bike?

+1 on the "2 scales." Plus you get the "weight distribution."

IMG_0452.jpg

IMG_0450.jpg

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The name "pit bull" is said almost as much as "hey man", but that is certainly the pit bull of motorcycles, regardless of brand.

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On 12/22/2019 at 1:10 PM, docc said:

+1 on the "2 scales." Plus you get the "weight distribution."

IMG_0452.jpg

IMG_0450.jpg

I saw some Guzzis that were a different color. Are they genuine?

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On 12/23/2019 at 7:26 AM, knumbnutz said:

Two scales and add together.
I haven't weighed it and last bike I did weigh I used industrial scales at the tip.


Sent from my ELE-L29 using Tapatalk
 

Or a scale at one end and a levelling block at the other end and then repeat the other way around and add together.

Ciao

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Tricky thing with this illustrated exercise, was to mount the rider in full gear and all luggage to assess the "weight distribution."  

 

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9 hours ago, docc said:

Tricky thing with this illustrated exercise, was to mount the rider in full gear and all luggage to assess the "weight distribution."  

 

Its an interesting exercise. You see race bikes often quote 53/47~ but I always wonder if this is with the rider. 

In fact, anytime I see these stats I think its irrelevant without an average sized rider on board. 

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19 hours ago, knumbnutz said:

Its an interesting exercise. You see race bikes often quote 53/47~ but I always wonder if this is with the rider. 

In fact, anytime I see these stats I think its irrelevant without an average sized rider on board. 

No those stats are always without the rider. Too many variations in riders. If you are too far outside the box these days with regard to your physique then you can pretty much forget getting a proper cutting edge sports bike to handle to its full potential. The bike and suspension and the tires are all designed these days for a rider between 5'4" and 5'8" 125 to 145 lbs.

As you move outside that box your ability to be competitive diminishes exponentially. You may think that that's only for road racers but if your 6'2" and 190 lbs nothing on a a modern hyper sports bike is designed for that kind of creature. Not suspension, ergonomics or tires. Doesnt mean its unridable on the road but your on a hiding to nothing getting it set up to be really good. Modern sports bikes are designed around modern racers,ie Jockey sized people.

Ciao 

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On 1/5/2020 at 11:15 PM, Lucky Phil said:

The bike and suspension and the tires are all designed these days for a rider between 125 to 145 lbs.

Hmm.  Does this mean that I actually need to be riding 2 bikes at the same time ?

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4 hours ago, bbolesaz said:

Hmm.  Does this mean that I actually need to be riding 2 bikes at the same time ?

I've heard 165 but I weigh around 220 so what difference would it make....lol

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IMG_3240.jpg

 

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I had to look up the introductory years of the Porsche 356 shown above with the V11 Sport: 1948-49.

So, right there with the Moto Guzzi Gambalunghino that inspired the V11 design (1949-52).

Proof positive, once again, that  :notworthy:Luciano Marabese totally nailed the design of the V11!  :thumbsup::mg:

 

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On 1/5/2020 at 10:15 PM, Lucky Phil said:

No those stats are always without the rider. Too many variations in riders. If you are too far outside the box these days with regard to your physique then you can pretty much forget getting a proper cutting edge sports bike to handle to its full potential. The bike and suspension and the tires are all designed these days for a rider between 5'4" and 5'8" 125 to 145 lbs.

As you move outside that box your ability to be competitive diminishes exponentially. You may think that that's only for road racers but if your 6'2" and 190 lbs nothing on a a modern hyper sports bike is designed for that kind of creature. Not suspension, ergonomics or tires. Doesnt mean its unridable on the road but your on a hiding to nothing getting it set up to be really good. Modern sports bikes are designed around modern racers,ie Jockey sized people.

Ciao 

True! My lowly, ancient EX500A1 (1987) has a 56.5 inch wheelbase and bars that rise about 4" above the triples. I am that 6-02/190 "mythical" rider and that bike just plain fits me. Few bikes that I have thrown a leg over have given me that impression. Of memory, the Victory V92SC, the Buell XB12 - for two polar opposites, and as I recently discovered, the Ballabio. Many bikes, especially at shows, have "the look" but not "the feel". Since I actually ride the bikes, I prefer them to have both, but the feel is paramount. The V11 sound, "filtered" through the Staintune cans, is simply icing on the cake.  It is a manly bike, if one is allowed that term these days, and requires some muscle, skill and involvement on the rider's part. No droning commuter bikes need apply. 

EX500A1%20copy.jpg

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1 hour ago, po18guy said:

True! My lowly, ancient EX500A1 (1987) has a 56.5 inch wheelbase and bars that rise about 4" above the triples. I am that 6-02/190 "mythical" rider and that bike just plain fits me. Few bikes that I have thrown a leg over have given me that impression. Of memory, the Victory V92SC, the Buell XB12 - for two polar opposites, and as I recently discovered, the Ballabio. Many bikes, especially at shows, have "the look" but not "the feel". Since I actually ride the bikes, I prefer them to have both, but the feel is paramount. The V11 sound, "filtered" through the Staintune cans, is simply icing on the cake.  It is a manly bike, if one is allowed that term these days, and requires some muscle, skill and involvement on the rider's part. No droning commuter bikes need apply. 

EX500A1%20copy.jpg

As am I:)

Ciao

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