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Guest redguzziv10

Swing Arm Bearings

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Guest redguzziv10

in case anyone is as stupid as me...

The swing arm bearings are

SKF

ID = 3303

part = A-2RSITN9/MT33

 

Apparently the important bit is the MT33 bit. Stands for high speed grease :wacko:

and they're a sun'fabitch to get out!

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Guest Nogbad

Why would you want high speed grease in a bearing that hardly moves and doesn't get hot...... :luigi:

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I take it that the V11's use the same double row angular contact type as the 1100Sports etc.? If so I've seen several earlier bikes with stuffed swingarm bearings, usually it does look like water intrusion as they are almost always rusty. The way I've got them out is with an expading puller and a sodding great slide-hammer pluss lots anmd lots of heat! The problem with this is that it does the swingarm paint a whole heap of no-good. Having said that the paint is pretty ordinary to start off with so perhaps if the bearings do need doing the trick would be to powder coat it properly before installation of the new bearings.

 

With any 2RS type bearing in an application like this I always pry a seal off and wash out the crappy silicone grease they put in there at the factory and add a dribble of oil and a goodly smear of bearing grease before re-installing the seal and puting the bearings into the swingarm with the side that has had the seal removed and replaced on the *inside*. I've also in the past swapped the AC bearings for tapered rollers with no problems.

 

Pete

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I replace them on my daytona rs and with a friend we just get crazy to get them out ! They are huge, this is some "double" bearings

 

We also put a lot of heat and i repaint swing arm after removing the bearings.

 

In fact a few water was inside but finaly the bearings was not completly died and i should have leave it inside by turning it of half a turn (remember the travel of swing arm is really reduce, it does not work on more than 25°)

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Guest redguzziv10

so this was the procedure...

1. 2lb slide hammer, no joy...

2. 4lb slide hammer, still no joy...

3. 4lb slide hammer with blow torch....nope!

4. weld a plate with an eye bolt on each bearing....hydraulic puller on it..... no chance!

5. grind the buggers into tiny little bits...success!

6. powder coat the swing arm due to damage caused during stage 3.

 

now i gotta get the new ones in... watch this space!

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so this was the procedure...

1. 2lb slide hammer, no joy...

2. 4lb slide hammer, still no joy...

3. 4lb slide hammer with blow torch....nope!

4. weld a plate with an eye bolt on each bearing....hydraulic puller on it..... no    chance!

5. grind the buggers into tiny little bits...success!

6. powder coat the swing arm due to damage caused during stage 3.

 

76579[/snapback]

 

Oddly enough, the few I've done this is EXACTLY the proceedure I've used :grin: Although I usually get the einner race and balls out and then shrink the outer race out of the arm with weld, it's still a frontbottom of a job.

 

As I said before I've also replaced the AC3 bearings with 32205's, a seal and some spacers to good effect.

 

pete

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Correction! they weren't 32205's. I think that they were whatever the Tonti's use which ISN'T a 32205. I got the spacers made and needed some slightly abnormal seals to go with them.

 

pete

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I took my swingarm to the local Ducati shop and paid them to remove them. Pretty simple for my part really. I think it cost $25. I bet the tech that removed them ran out of swear words though :mg:

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so this was the procedure...

1. 2lb slide hammer, no joy...

2. 4lb slide hammer, still no joy...

3. 4lb slide hammer with blow torch....nope!

4. weld a plate with an eye bolt on each bearing....hydraulic puller on it..... no chance!

5. grind the buggers into tiny little bits...success!

6. powder coat the swing arm due to damage caused during stage 3.

 

now i gotta get the new ones in... watch this space!

Maybe I'm just lucky, but...

JUST came in from the garage after doing my swing arm bearings, (and a right front wheel bearing, bike at just over 15,000 miles). One felt pretty notchy, the other showed the first signs of following the other in due time. Started doing the "Search" thing here, and was not encouraged by my reading. Started having visions of busted knuckles, dremel scarred components, and time enough during the hellish removal to drink enough to be pissed at a piece of steel.

So instead, I put the whole swing arm in the oven at 190 degrees for a hour or two. Then just popped 'em right out with an expanding I.D. puller. Not a single problem. Immediately took the new pair from the freezer, and popped 'em right in.

Come to think of it, I am DAMN lucky. I can just see the ol' lady's face if she looked in either of "her" appliances! :whistle:..."you and yer damn motorcycles...blah, blah, yadda, yadda...and so on..." :lol:

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Guest ratchethack

Congrats on 2 counts, SH: 1. A successful, well thought out procedure (well noted for future consideration). 2. Risking the wrath of She Who Must be Obeyed by defiling the very heart of Her Domain with nasty, smelly moto parts -- and living to tell the tale. :P

 

Just a thought. Not suggesting the following would've been the case in your situation (or any other), but as has been the case with other swingarms on previous moto's -- when I had my Guzzi swingarm out approx. 20K miles back, the bearings likewise felt "notchy". Considering their range of back and forth rotation is confined to something <10 degrees, I worked them all the way around repeatedly, upon which they instantly smoothed out completely and felt as solid as new. Can't recall now, in all truth, but I b'lieve I injected fresh grease in there under the seals with my handy dandy converted medical grease syringe. In any case, I re-installed the swingarm with the OE bearings intact.

 

I'd reasoned that the grease had "piled up" and semi-hardened in place over time at the end of rotation in the races between the rollers, and that these little accumulations were easily enough "plowed through" by extending the range of motion, and all's well. Have observed the same thing with U-joint bearings. When I had the swingarm out again some 10K miles later, I found the same circumstance to a lesser degree, and treated it the same way. 35K miles now with no symptoms of bearing deterioration wotsoever (either swingarm or U-joints).

 

But o' course and as always, TJM, & YMMV. :luigi:

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Congrats on 2 counts, SH: 1. A successful, well thought out procedure (well noted for future consideration). 2. Risking the wrath of She Who Must be Obeyed by defiling the very heart of Her Domain with nasty, smelly moto parts -- and living to tell the tale. :P

 

Just a thought. Not suggesting the following would've been the case in your situation (or any other), but as has been the case with other swingarms on previous moto's -- when I had my Guzzi swingarm out approx. 20K miles back, the bearings likewise felt "notchy". Considering their range of back and forth rotation is confined to something

 

I'd reasoned that the grease had "piled up" and semi-hardened in place over time at the end of rotation in the races between the rollers, and that these little accumulations were easily enough "plowed through" by extending the range of motion, and all's well. Have observed the same thing with U-joint bearings. When I had the swingarm out again some 10K miles later, I found the same circumstance to a lesser degree, and treated it the same way. 35K miles now with no symptoms of bearing deterioration wotsoever (either swingarm or U-joints).

 

But o' course and as always, TJM, & YMMV. :luigi:

Actually, My thoughts ran on the same line whilst disassembling her. So with the idea of being as prepared as possible, to minimize downtime, and have more excuses to trip on down to my local moto shop, hang out, and breath in real shop atmosphere (it's a real shop. No perfumes, gym shoes or psuedo bikers looking for the latest shiny thing that advances the RIDING experience NOT ONE IOTA), and put the old bearings on the "stuff to tinker with on Down Time" shelf. Mucho spin overs didn't give me that "Yeah, that's better" feeling. Smooth bearings make for safe happy riders, motorsickles can be very unforgiving, and the cheap sooner or later pay more than I am willing... :thumbsup:

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Well it looks like i will have to do this job, removed the swingarm (easier than i thought) and the bearing on the drive side is knackered. Dont think my swingarm will fit in our oven (will check when wife is out). Any other tips for getting them out!!!

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Make sure said part is COMPLETELY degreased before you start baking !

 p.s. When you replace these bearings , remove one of the seal covers and pack the inside with grease and put the cover back in place. Put this side to the inslde of the swingarm in case you boogered this part up in the process.  If you want , you can practice on the old bearings.

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Well it,s out. Never took the chance with the oven. A right bug:er of a job. Just have to wait for the new bearing to arrive. Hopefully thats it for another few years.

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