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2000 v11 sport observations and questions


mikev
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Relay 2 (from the front)is a busy place. Sure, headlight relay, but as noted also the tachometer. 
 

Tach starts acting sketchy? Know that the headlight and brake light are also compromised, but more importantly: the charging system has lost its voltage reference and is not charging. This is why the bike will run progressively worse until the battery (and the bike) dies from a Relay2 failure. 
 

The power to the some of the Warning (“idiot”) Lights on the dash [ oil, battery, fuel] also comes through Relay 2. The Battery Warning Light (early V11 only) will not warn you of not charging from Relay 2 failure.

Certainly, Relay 2 is another good candidate for a good quality high current relay. 

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Relay 3 is worth understanding because 1) it is the least stressed relay (best place to pull a spare from the stack), and 2) while it is referred to as the Sidestand Relay, it is activated by the Neutral Switch (not the Sidestand Switch). This relay sends current to the Run Switch with the bike in neutral even if the Sidestand is down. 
 

When the Sidestand is up, it’s switch sends current directly to the Run Switch (no relay). 
 

Relay 3 would more correctly be called the Neutral Relay, IMO. 

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@mikev Looks like you scored on the chinadian Omrons :thumbsup:

Otoh I'm not sure how the chinese made CIT A1 relays ever got the nod.. Afaik their continuous current rating has never been published.. Only Omron, Panasonic and Picker disclose that value in their datasheets. And althought Panasonic downrates their CM1 relays switching capacity(resistive) of 35A/20A-NO/NC to 20/10-NO/NC max. continuous current, Omron high current G8HN & G8HE report equal values for resistive and continuous at 35/20-NO/NC and Picker PC782 reported max. continuous current value of 35A is given indistinctive of NO/NC.  :huh2:

Interestingly, Picker Components is a wholly owned subsidiary of CIT Relays & Switch..

Another relay option I found interesting is the japanese made Omron G8HN high current(G8HN-1C4T-RH) used by Suzuki.

@docc Very compelling information on the different relays and their various functions. It would surely come in handy while chasing electrical gremlins that can affect the V11s. It would be worth assembling into a compelling spreadsheet or pdf.. ;)

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That "Picker Components"  high current relay @Speedfrog has sourced may  be the best one available, currently . . .

[haha - I got to say "current" and "currently" in the same post. :grin: ]

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I changed spark plugs today and left boot came off wire so I jammed it back in.  Right boot is torn, but wire didn’t come out.  Bike started and sounded normal afterward…..

so I ordered 4 new red boots from UK, red ones unavailable in us?

thinking I should just buy the NGK racing wire and boot assembly from mgcycle, but they don’t come with coil boots.  What kind of coil boots do v11s require?  

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1 hour ago, docc said:

That "Picker Components"  high current relay may be the best one available, currently . . .

Picker had the PC686 Micro ISO relay rated at 40A continuous..! Unfortunatly it's not in production anymore. Makes me think they know how to build a high current micro relay though..

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Yeah that looks right.  How does the ignition wire attach to the coil?  I’ll have to look at my bike and see.  I assumed there was some metal spring or something inside the boot like the other end at the spark plug.  That just looks like a rubber cover.

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4 hours ago, mikev said:

Yeah that looks right.  How does the ignition wire attach to the coil?  I’ll have to look at my bike and see.  I assumed there was some metal spring or something inside the boot like the other end at the spark plug.  That just looks like a rubber cover.

Yeah, man, the coil wire should have a terminal on it:

IMG_5911.jpg

That connection can be vulnerable to damage:

IMG_5909.jpg

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On 8/11/2022 at 10:37 AM, docc said:

Yeah, man, the coil wire should have a terminal on it:

IMG_5911.jpg

That connection can be vulnerable to damage:

IMG_5909.jpg

Oof, one more thing to check before the Spine Raid.

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3 hours ago, mikev said:

it looks like it *might* be possible to change spark plug wires without taking tank off...

Yep, especially if you can get the bike up on a lift sitting vertical.

Do be aware that the coil mounts are fragile, so don't be prying hard to remove the ignition wire. Good to check to be sure the mounts have not already failed (common).

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  • 3 weeks later...

I made myself some new spark plug wires with the red NGK racing from mgcycles.  Cut to length with new connectors (marxparts) and reused old coil boots.  No corrosion in the terminal.  I was able to swap them out without removing the fuel tank.  It's a bit of an awkward spot but doable.

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