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Rear wheel removal


red lion
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Can someone please tell me the correct way to remove the rear wheel on an 2001 V11 Rosso Mandello? I tried to break the axle bolt but the axle turned with it. What size hex key is used  for the other side of the axle? And what should be lubed when the wheel is off?

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Did you have the original tool kit? There is a small tool, looks like a an inch sawed off a hex key, that you can hold with a wrench while turning the axle nut.

If not, you can buy a set of large hex keys at your local Harbor Freight. I don't recall the exact size you need, but maybe a 10mm. If you have some spare bolts lying around you can find one that fits, and then see what size socket that bolt fits into.

 

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Most O'reilly Auto parts stores in the Bay area sell individual hex sockets that size..probably at least 3/4 if not 1 inch..so you may need a socket adapter  if you don't have one..its worth the investment you will always need it if you own that bike.

Like Scud says..see if you have a larger size bolt around that the head fits..or better yet use a  Micrometer if you have one

Pay close attention to the order of disassembly to the inner and outerspacers and washers as they come off the axel ..its easy to screw that up.

 

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For sure clean the splines,, and everything, and a light coat of Kluber Staburags or MP3 grease. I woud also check, and grease the little bearing at the outher end of rear drive.

Cheers Tom.

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also, and this might be in the "wheels off" checklist but, check the wheel bearings for any notchy-ness. Some in-wheel bearing spacers were short giving a heavy lateral load, causing the balls to notch the race. (hope that was understandable) I roll the wheel (off bike) with a finger in each bearing, elevate it off the floor so it spins, and can feel if the bearings are not rolling smoothly. If you feel any drag or unevenness, it's best to replace them.

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2 hours ago, red lion said:

I read on an other post not to pull the axle all the way out, Only about 6or7 inches That it makes the job easier. Is this correct?

Yeah, man, once you have the back of the bike lifted, it is helpful to "chock"/support the tire/wheel to take the weight off the axle. I use a brass drive (or wooden dowel) to drive the axle through the brake caliper carrier, then the wheel bearings leaving it to support the rear drive.

With the caliper/carrier removed, the wheel can be wiggled off of the drive hub and rolled out beneath the fender/hugger.

There is a spacer sleeve between the wheel and the rear drive to be mindful of.

As @Tomchri said, Klüber Staburags on the drive hub teeth. Cleaning , rotating and liberally greasing the right, outboard needle cage will require removing the axle and lifting the rear drive away from the swing arm. This is an absolutely critical lubrication point to stop moisture/water entering and ruining the nose of the crown wheel:

IMG_4845.jpg

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Here is an image of a couple rear drives, removed, with the right side, outboard "needle cage" and central race.  This bearing only moves in an arc with the suspension movement (does not spin) So, good to rotate that inner race to a new position. If it is dry or rusty, clean thoroughly, polish, and grease liberally with waterproof grease (as for marine applications). There should be a large washer between the bearing and swingarm. Grease it liberally as well . . .

IMG_3714.JPG

What can happen to the inner race, if neglected (bottom row: far left = ruin't / far right=new) . . .

IMG_8887.jpg

[top row is the internal spacer on the axle between the wheel and rear drive.]

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Okay, one more that shows the washer that helps protect the needle cage if liberally greased. I emphasize this because mySport was missing this part.

Perhaps from the factory, perhaps from some careless technician (not me this time!)  . . .

IMG_8723.jpg

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12 hours ago, billgreenman1 said:

Tons easier to grease the u-joints on the drive shaft with the wheel off. I made several reference marks until I noticed the factory yellow lines...

Yeah man.  Just take it off- you can access the rear of the tranny too to give it a good clean (swingarm as well), and also refresh your clutch fluid whilst you’re there cos why not? 🙂

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53 minutes ago, stewgnu said:

also refresh your clutch fluid whilst you’re there cos why not? 🙂

Yes. Old moisture laden fluid will affect the feel at the lever, and the slave bleeder is easy to get to now.

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