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Anyone else had this problem - The lower bolt that attaches the bracket that the side stand attaches to broke and bent the bracket beyond 90. I've got local enginerring co trying to bent it back to 90 but they weren't hopeful. See photo in my members gallery. So I'm on the hunt for a new one. Harpers have one but its a bit expensive

large.Sidestand.jpg.b6eba6ec1bbf486fb9c4

[docc added image]

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It is quite common the fasteners gets loose, making the bracket vulnerable to bending. The small, lower faster should be snugged up routinely (say, at every oil change). Realize that the larger, top faster torques to 70 Nm (!). I don't recall anyone trying to straighten a bent bracket back.

DSCN2894.jpg

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9 hours ago, cash1000 said:

Anyone else had this problem - The lower bolt that attaches the bracket that the side stand attaches to broke and bent the bracket beyond 90. I've got local enginerring co trying to bent it back to 90 but they weren't hopeful. See photo in my members gallery. So I'm on the hunt for a new one. Harpers have one but its a bit expensive

large.Sidestand.jpg.b6eba6ec1bbf486fb9c4

[docc added image]

Did this shop try heating it up w/a torch to bend it back ? I don't suppose there are ANY salvage yards there so you might try eBay or a MG dealership to get another one ?

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Posted (edited)
20 hours ago, cash1000 said:

Anyone else had this problem - The lower bolt that attaches the bracket that the side stand attaches to broke and bent the bracket beyond 90.

It's lucky that you have a center stand on your bike, otherwise that would be really inconvenient. 

On my bike, I noticed that the lower bolt was slightly bent as I put it back, so I take your problem as as warning. 

Edited by MartyNZ
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7 hours ago, DucatiGuzziIndian said:

is that sump a little wet on the back end Docc?

Use to was! That's a rather long story, but has a happy ending . . .

IMG_2704.JPG

 

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On 7/9/2024 at 12:39 AM, cash1000 said:

Anyone else had this problem - The lower bolt that attaches the bracket that the side stand attaches to broke and bent the bracket beyond 90. I've got local enginerring co trying to bent it back to 90 but they weren't hopeful. See photo in my members gallery. So I'm on the hunt for a new one. Harpers have one but its a bit expensive

large.Sidestand.jpg.b6eba6ec1bbf486fb9c4

[docc added image]

Harpers:thumbsup:   I ain't had very good luck lately with fleabay new/used stuff for sale but what do I know.  That stand bracket looks to be cast aluminum, bends one way but not so easily back the other way without breaking is a ferrous material.  Definitely possible to straighten with heat I guess.  I like the idea of checking securement hardware at oil change/annual checklist item or possibly using locktite (medium) or lock washers. Good luck.

 

Edited by guzziart
I goofed, stand bracket is not aluminum according to my magnet.
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my lower bolt was somewhat loose, makes me want to spend some quality time torquing all the little fasteners everywhere on the bike

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9 hours ago, guzziart said:

Harpers:thumbsup:   I ain't had very good luck lately with fleabay new/used stuff for sale but what do I know.  That stand bracket looks to be cast aluminum, bends one way but not so easily back the other way without breaking is a ferrous material.  Definitely possible to straighten with heat I guess.  I like the idea of checking securement hardware at oil change/annual checklist item or possibly using locktite (medium) or lock washers. Good luck.

 

Yes they are cast steel.

Phil

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For your own benefit , install a stud in that small bolt area on the sidestand bracket . When you tighten a bolt you are screwing a bolt into the threads of the engine block. When you install a stud and tighten the nut , you are pulling on the stud to tighten the sidestand to the engine block. A much better setup and no chance of wearing out the threads in the block . 

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4 minutes ago, gstallons said:

For your own benefit , install a stud in that small bolt area on the sidestand bracket . When you tighten a bolt you are screwing a bolt into the threads of the engine block. When you install a stud and tighten the nut , you are pulling on the stud to tighten the sidestand to the engine block. A much better setup and no chance of wearing out the threads in the block . 

I love this evolutionary solution! Brilliant! :nerd:

Nut with a NyLock, even . . . :luigi:

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On 7/13/2024 at 12:25 PM, docc said:

I love this evolutionary solution! Brilliant! :nerd:

Nut with a NyLock, even . . . :luigi:

From an engineering perspective it makes zero difference whether it's stud or a bolt and nut. If it's something thats coming on and off all the time a stud would be preferable but otherwise it doesn't matter. It's easier to buy a decent grade of bolt than a stud as well. An interesting aside, all the load on a threaded hole or nut is taken by the first 6 threads and just over 60% of that is taken by the first 2 full threads in the hole or nut. From memory it's like 36% for the first full thread and 25% for the second thread and it tapers off for the last 4.

 

Phil

Edited by Lucky Phil
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The information I have I had from talking to old mechanics . The stud pulls straight up on the threads whereas the screw twists on the threads .  

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