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docc

Swing arm pins

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I know the manual says " put the swingarm pins back where you found them."

 

But my swingarm has been replaced. Now I wonder how deep to set the pins. For the last 4000 miles I've just set them the same both sides but surely there's more to it than that??

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Although not an exact answer....

 

It was discussed some here:

 

http://www.v11lemans.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=2719

 

And here:

 

http://www.v11lemans.com/forums/index.php?...736&hl=swingarm

 

 

...in the end, I just put them on hand tight, even, then backed them off a tad, then cinched down the lock nuts.

 

al

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If it is any help I think you did it right Al. :luigi:

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Thank you, Gentlemen! :notworthy:

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Docc,

 

If you are curious about your tire alignment you can run two staightedges along the rear tire up to the front. (make sure you bike is upright, center stand or helper) Then measure the distance to either side of the front tire. It should be darn close. Also if the tires are not parallel bikes track real funny through turns. I would think you would notice it.

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I would like to think I would notice it , too. But, sometimes I think I must not be that swift of a rider. I'll scope out the alignment and see if it shows any asymmetry.

 

I turned the pins in and the right went in further than the left. I turned the left out a full turn and the right out two to make them look similar in the lock nut. Am I making more trouble ?

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I think you are asking for trouble as that is too much free play.

As for the alignment, you may be okay, but bring that free play down to nil or nothing or even less(lightly torque it).

Go for a test ride on a flat, no crown road or parking lot, and look down your forks while riding in a straight line.

If it is not symetrical, you likely need to make an adjustment.

This is not the perfect test as the bike is not perfectly balanced, nor is your body...even if you are a chiropractor :P

But it may give you a clue.

The better way is to get out the straight edges, blocks, string, lasers, and or flash lights .

I'll bet a bike handles a lot better in the rain if it is aligned... :blink:

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The old tip I got for straight edges is use a long fluorescent light bulb.

J

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It doesn't seem like the pins move the swingarm or locate it. The swingarm appears to be located by the side plates, no?

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Yes, but if the pins are offset, they can put undue pressure on the frame.

I don't know about the spine frames, but on the Tonti frames, there is a fair amount of play and you could have a straight rear wheel, but offset by 1/4" or so.

J

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Although not certain... that is, I haven't jammed a feeler up there.... but I also think that on the Spine frames, the bearing/swingarm-end seems to be up against the back of the side-plates, so I don't think there is much room for play.

 

Maybe someone knows for sure if the sideplates locate the swingarm almost exactly? It seems close from what I can remember... but I may be wrong.

 

It would be nice though, and would settle concerns about centering via the pins.

 

Anyone know for sure? Perhaps I'll attempt to check this evening if I remember.

 

al

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Okay. Just for the sake of argument, let's assume the engineers that designed the V11 Sport knew what they were doing. First off, since the V11 Sport had the new transmission, the rear end had to be redesigned, it shouldn't have any measurements in common with anything built before. Any assumptions that it would be the same as a Sport 1100i, an Eldorado or anything else are unlikely to be true. It would be perfectly logical to assume that at the time of design, the intended position for the swingarm would be to be centered between the side plates. There would be three positions that always be certain, full left, full right and mid-point in between the two and my guess is that the center is the intended location as full up against either side would invite parts rubbing together. That said, I used a digital depth gauge to set my swingarm. I loosened one side pin and then used the other side to push the swingarm up against the sideplate. Then I ran in the loose pin until it just stopped. Then I measured the length of the threads protruding out of the side plate. Then I reversed the process and measured the amount of threads protruding on that same pin. I seem to recall that the movement is something like 4 millimeters (bad memory, so don't hold me to this). Dividing the two thread depths gets you the desired measurement to center the swingarm. Then all you have to do is back out the pin (the deepest one in) that amount and spin the other side in until there is no play and no excessive side load on the bearings.

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It doesn't seem like the pins move the swingarm or locate it. The swingarm appears to be located by the side plates, no?

I could not speak for the v11 but for the daytona rs i just replace the swing arm bearing of one of my daytona so.

 

The swing arm as still some free play when you put it in the right place between the side plates ...

 

So when we adjust the settings we only put it back like it was.

So it was properly center, same distance from each side.

 

Now i don't have check if it was perfect for the wheels alignement but till this little part replacement i don't experiment any trouble with the bike even in high speed curves ( > 180 km/h)

 

By the way NEVER try to replace by yourself the V11 / Centauro /daytona / sport swingarm bearing. :not::homer:

NEVER, it jut awfull to do. Give it to a bearing specialist. :!:

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I used the Carl Allison method and found the pins push the swingarm laterally 0.078" ( 2 mm ). Using a Vernier caliper I centered the swingarm without play.

 

Apparently the pins 'capture' the center of the swingarm bearings. These bearings are identical to the wheel bearings. Without capturing the center the swingarm would be free to rotate around the pin instead of within the bearing.

 

( It is notable that these bearings gather a lot of crud and would benefit from a periodic check, clean and grease.) :luigi::luigi:

 

Thanks to all for the insight and replies. I have much more confidence in the setting now. :bier:

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After the ride to the mountains I find a bit of head shake not there before. After talking with Andy I find this improves by backing the pins off 1/4 turn per side.

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