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Under the seat on left, back; third from the front.

Stand by for pics and links . . .

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Here ya go, buddy:

gallery_328_223_1207979.jpeg

The factory "mini" fuse is pretty awful about heat damage. My ordeal chronicled here:

 

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Thanks docc I was thinking it was a stand alone fuse, its in the fuse block. Then it all looks good.

 

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I really love your 30 amp circuit breaker solution. When I re-wire the bike this winter with an m-unit, I will totally steal this idea for the one and only fuse that will still be needed for the charging circuit. 

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One idea is to drill ventilation holes into the lid. Sometimes these fuse boxes can retain a lot of heat and that can lead to issues. In my semi truck, I routed the passenger A/C duct to blow right across my huge fuse panel. Haven’t had any problems in a good long while.

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Yeah, I even tried running with the fuse block lid off. No joy. That is a hard area to ventilate on the V11 without flowing in road-crap and weather-scuz.  :bbblll:

Honda VFR guys learned to use computer hard-drive fans to cool their regulators. Is that what we have come to? :nerd:

Turn the left side of the V11 into a Testarossa, of sorts?

Ferrari-Testarossa-Miami-Vice-7.jpg

Or just go total Jim Hall/ Chapparal . . .

sd-aspect-1484850927-chap.jpg?resize=640

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Those were awesome! Mechanical downforce! It’s a tight package.. best you can do is make sure the contacts are clean and tight. I bought circuit breakers to replace the fuses so in case something goes south you have the ability to at least get to a safe area.

Messing around on the side of any road is dangerous business. Trust me on that.

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327f33e7df923672b199dd675c87833c.jpg

Experienced my first main fuse meltdown today, but didn’t know about it before now.

Must admit I ignored the red charging light during my fast ride today, because I was so eager to blow some steam off on a curvy road just north of my home. Indian summer, low traffic, mountain area, clear blue sky, man and machine become one. Nothing could stop me. Not even a red light.

Well, at last it did.

It caused the low fuel indicator to fail, so I ran out of fuel in some rural area...
Later on the turn signal stopped working, and when the starter motor failed after filling fuel, I knew the battery was almost empty.

Thank god I had spare fuses with me. The fuse holder was also pretty melted, but managed to replace the 30A fuse. A friend of mine came along, lucky me! Of course he had jumper cables and a multimeter. He’s a Harley driver.

Can’t hardly wait to get the Greenie in the basement for winter, and start the big makeover.

An 30A circuit breaker sounds like a good idea:)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Edited by hammershaug
Minor adjustmenst
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I suggested this quite a while ago

Take a maxi fuse link and drill a hole in each blade then bolt lugs to it, that will ensure a low resistance and no heat.

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On 9/21/2019 at 10:13 AM, hammershaug said:

327f33e7df923672b199dd675c87833c.jpg

Experienced my first main fuse meltdown today, but didn’t know about it before now.

Must admit I ignored the red charging light during my fast ride today, because I was so eager to blow some steam off on a curvy road just north of my home. Indian summer, low traffic, mountain area, clear blue sky, man and machine become one. Nothing could stop me. Not even a red light.

Well, at last it did.

It caused the low fuel indicator to fail, so I ran out of fuel in some rural area...
Later on the turn signal stopped working, and when the starter motor failed after filling fuel, I knew the battery was almost empty.

Thank god I had spare fuses with me. The fuse holder was also pretty melted, but managed to replace the 30A fuse. A friend of mine came along, lucky me! Of course he had jumper cables and a multimeter. He’s a Harley driver.

Can’t hardly wait to get the Greenie in the basement for winter, and start the big makeover.

An 30A circuit breaker sounds like a good idea:)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

These bikes are known for eating voltage rectifiers. For a while I thought mine had a short somewhere in the wiring. After a while the voltage rectifiers just go. One thing I do that seems to help is when I don't ride I keep the bike on a battery tender. Just in case. But if the battery is low and you keep cranking the starter with low voltage you fuse WILL pop. 

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18 minutes ago, Rox Lemans said:

These bikes are known for eating voltage rectifiers. For a while I thought mine had a short somewhere in the wiring. After a while the voltage rectifiers just go. One thing I do that seems to help is when I don't ride I keep the bike on a battery tender. Just in case. But if the battery is low and you keep cranking the starter with low voltage you fuse WILL pop. 

I believe that happens because of the flakey Voltage reference downstream of the headlight relay. This is particularly bad on the earlier bikes where they had two relay contacts in series with the headlight current,

The Voltage the regulator sees is normally about half a Volt lower than the battery Voltage but if the bike has been sitting for a while I have seen mine as much as 1 Volt lower. So when the regulator sees a Voltage 1 Volt lower it jacks up the charging to compensate and the charge current goes up exponentially which will overheat the diodes melting the leads off.

My first experience with this I was able to remove the potting material and re-attach the leads to get about another year out of the regulator, I also took the opportunity to reverse engineer the circuit.

Finally I decided to fit a direct connected regulator, this solved the charging problem however it did add a small residual current that would flatten the battery if left over the winter.

 

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2 minutes ago, Kiwi_Roy said:

Finally I decided to fit a direct connected regulator, this solved the charging problem however it did add a small residual current that would flatten the battery if left over the winter.

however it did add a small residual current that would flatten a NEW battery in a hot summer garage in Mesa, AZ if left for 4-5 weeks.

Another data point.

Solution, ride more.

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16 hours ago, Rox Lemans said:

These bikes are known for eating voltage rectifiers. For a while I thought mine had a short somewhere in the wiring. After a while the voltage rectifiers just go. One thing I do that seems to help is when I don't ride I keep the bike on a battery tender. Just in case. But if the battery is low and you keep cranking the starter with low voltage you fuse WILL pop. 

Thanks for your tip. I think my battery is in good health, but can't be 100% sure of it. Haven't cranked the motor much either. Several trips a week, and it starts right away.

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