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Oil Temperature range


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Thanks for bringing this to light, Lucky Phil! True that bubbles start to form in water at 70C. Those bubbles (of water vapor) don’t readily rise to the surface at that temperature, so likely would have a hard time escaping something more viscous like motor oil. 
 

Seems motors stored in dampness and high humidity for longer periods would benefit from the higher operating temperatures and/or longer rides. 
 

Given the choice, I recommend the longer rides! :race:

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Its a combination of many things but its mainly the difference between air and liquid cooling. Liquid cooling is a far superior and more stable way to cool an IC engine and that translates to less eng

Don't be.   Apart from anything else it should be remembered that the original big block motor was designed to sit idling in Milan traffic in high summer with a fat Carribinieri sitting on t

You need to remember that the oil temp doesn't actually need to reach 100 deg C or 212 F to evaporate off the water. Put a pot of water on the stove and watch the vapour start rising way before 100 de

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8 hours ago, docc said:

Thanks for bringing this to light, Lucky Phil! True that bubbles start to form in water at 70C. Those bubbles (of water vapor) don’t readily rise to the surface at that temperature, so likely would have a hard time escaping something more viscous like motor oil. 
 

Seems motors stored in dampness and high humidity for longer periods would benefit from the higher operating temperatures and/or longer rides. 
 

Given the choice, I recommend the longer rides! :race:

I did a 2 min research on the interweb after I made that post but got bored. All I know is when you boil the kettle it starts to produce vapour quite a bit before it reaches boiling point. My Ducatis with the oil sight glass also produce a light bit of Mayo when started from cold in the workshop and after a warm up and a lap around the block it's cleared. Not very scientific I know but I lean towards the practical experience even when the scientific says otherwise sometimes. And thats a whole nother interesting discussion right there as the dissimilar materials folks would attest:)

Ciao  

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There's always going to be moisture in the case. Water is one of the major by products of combustion and blow by means there is plenty in the case. The whole idea is to try and prevent it condensing into water while it's in there so it can be expelled.

I actually have an identical thermostat to Mark's sitting in my van at the moment but right now I simply can't be bothered to fit it. I very rarely ride in the rain any more and that, more than anything else, will have the oil temperature plummeting! As it is my Griso idles at about 1400rpm and evening in 40*C ambient temps, in traffic, it has never dangerously overheated it's oil. Unless I get caught in the rain the oil temperature will hold at 75-80*C and a few minutes in traffic will have it up around 100*C in short order even in single digit ambient temperatures.

Yes I think a thermostat is a great idea and I think it is unfortunate that they chose not to use one in the cooling circuit of the 8V but for my usage nowadays I don't really worry about it's absence.

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