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Lucky Phil

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Lucky Phil last won the day on April 2

Lucky Phil had the most liked content!

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About Lucky Phil

  • Rank
    "I live here"

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  • My bikes
    v11 sport,GSXR1000 K7,Ducati1198s, Ducati1000ss,DucatiST2.
  • Location
    Australia

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  1. Turning down the end of the pushrod is a 2 minute job. It's not the feel of engagement I'm interested in it's the better shifting and faster engine response. The Guzzi now feels more "Ducati" in the response to the throttle which is only a better thing. You don't need to roll the throttle anymore during a downshift, just flick it and the engine responds immediately. Makes downshifts far better and also much better on the upshifts as well. Ciao
  2. RAM units will fit either bike 5 or 6 speed, the only difference being the gearbox input drive spline. It's my belief you can easily modify the twin plate input spline to suit the 6 speeder single plate anyway. The clutch high wear issue was dealt with years ago and was primarily an issue with the std Guzzi plate. I think from memory Pete had a RAM unit in a race bike that wore quickly but thats a race bike. The modern RAM clutches are now light weigh units with a steel flywheel. After you've used an Alloy RAM clutch it would be hard to go back to the Guzzi twin plate boat anchor for me. Every
  3. I don't quite understand this. Do you mean any bike Guzzi come up with needs to better the Guareschi bike? If so then thats not a valid position. Anyone with the fabrication skills can come up with a motorcycle that is basically a "track day" bike only. It's doesn't need to meet any road bike criteria of any kind whatsoever and on top of that this particular bike with it's mile long wheelbase, shaft drive and weight would get it's arse handed to it in a competitive race track situation by a decent rider. If you like this sort of narrow focus bike, fair enough but it can't be compared to a bike
  4. Why wouldn't you use a new RAM unit at around $750US. Two thousand British pounds is around $3700AUD. I'd part the bike out before I paid that sort of money. Ciao
  5. I only bought it for the Manual ability. I have "nanny" chargers that won't charge a battery if it's below about 10.5 volts which are annoying. Use this one on "manual" to get them back up to a decent state of charge then switch it to "auto" seems to work OK. Not sure about how or if the Lithium setting works on this charger as they require a constant amperage and variable voltage. Ciao
  6. I recently bought this "cheapy" off ebay ( around $35AU so about 2 cents US) specifically because it had a "manual" setting. It's brought the Odyssey back up to full charge from 5 volts but the capacity seems poor. Now on manual it will punch 16 volts into it and just a few amps so I'm not using the manual mode anymore. I'm trying to drop the voltage down with a load and hit it again. It supposedly does Lithium Iron batteries as well. HMM not so sure about that.
  7. A question for those more electrically inclined than I. My Odyssey battery has dropped it's bundle again I think due to inactivity and a faulty Reg. I noticed when I pulled it to install the Daytona engine it had been leaking a small amount of fluid. This also happened with the previous one as well and I thought I had solved the apparent overcharging with modifying the wiring to the headlight to prevent the typical voltage drop and the false voltage sensing experienced by the Reg. Apparently not it seems so I fitted the new ELE std wiring REG I already had and cleaned up the battery and instal
  8. Often especially for the round wire a small jewellers screwdriver is best or a pick with a similar flat end. A round pick on a round wire end doesn't work well although a pick or driver with a flat end on a round wire works much better. Ciao
  9. Use a small pick (preferably brass) to pull the end of the wire out of the groove and with these you can carefully allow them to unwind out of the groove. Best if you can grab the end with a pair of needle nose pliers and guide it out as often the ends are just cut off and have a sharp edge which can scratch the alloy housing if not held clear. Or you can just slip a feeler gauge in there on the end to protect the housing as you uncoil it out of the groove. Hold the leg securely though and initially stick some masking tape over half the opening in case the initial action flicks it out. If
  10. I can't see the details doc but it looks like a wire not a circlip? In the video removing a large Circlip that way is just horrible. You almost certainly distort the clip so it cant be re used and at the same time bur up the edges of the groove it seats in. Big clips like that are tricky to deal with but here's a tip. The component in the video can be held down on the bench with a pair of simple padded QR carpenters clamps so you aren't chasing the thing all over the bench while dealing with the Circlip. Or you can use another methodology. I would have used a pair of straight pliers and when y
  11. Yes a video on how to NOT remove a Circlip. Ciao
  12. I personally wouldn't be doing that. Ciao
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