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How do you ride your V11 for the best curve negotiation control? close to the tank, or close to the cowl?


p6x
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Today I rode 160 miles non stop. Nothing fancy, just trying to get a feel for the handling, and the best way to sit on the bike.

I was on the I-10 towards San Antonio.

When negotiating curves the handling is more responsive if my back is against the cowl. It also helps to lean inside the fairing to cut the wind. Now it has one major draw back. I am six feet tall, and my legs are locked underneath my body when I crouch, so if I want to do a quick change of trajectory, it is difficult to lean out of the bike.

If I seat directly behind the tank, it is easier to lean out to negotiate the curves and to sweep left and right. My legs are not locked, but the bike is less maneuverable that way.

I have not yet tried tighter curves. The Le Mans is very stable at speed while curving, but it is not really agile or easy to get out of the initial angle. I went briefly up to 6000 rpm, and did some quick changes to check. It is like a rail, but you can't really move it from its chosen glide slope.

Is this more or less the consensus here?

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This is less so on the earlier "ShortFrame" V11. I found that once I had selected fork and shock springs for my weight and "sag", and biased the sag more toward the front, I get the best handling moving forward "behind the tank" and weighting the front.

One of the simplest adjustments is to be certain the steering damper is backed completely off (set to the least damping).

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Another very simple adjustment is tire pressure. Over this long time, and 58 tires, I firm the rear pressure over the front 40/35 PSI.

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3 minutes ago, docc said:

This is less so on the earlier "ShortFrame" V11. I found that once I had selected fork and shock springs for my weight and "sag", and biased the sag more toward the front, I get the best handling moving forward "behind the tank" and weighting the front.

One of the simplest adjustments is to be certain the steering damper is backed completely off (set to the least damping).

I have not yet touched any of the settings. I like to be smooth and I don't really fancy wrestling the front.

I will check the damper before my next ride. On another subject, not a single cough or sputter and it was really hot... I rode from 10:30 until 1:30ish pm.

 

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Agree with Docc that redframe rear needs to be stiffer than the front.  In fact, I keep the fork pretty soft and run about 32lb in front and 40 rear.  My bike is prone to weave in wind-speed-semi traffic otherwise, particularly with the HB bags.    Certainly stiffen up the front for tight twisties of you like. 

I suppose body position is based on riding styles.  I Like to lean on the front of the bike, the pegs give good leverage for the rear.  

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2 minutes ago, docc said:

Another very simple adjustment is tire pressure. Over this long time, and 58 tires, I firm the rear pressure over the front 40/35 PSI.

I run a similar arrangement on my tire pressure. I am on Michelin Pilot Road, but I cannot tell which version. I think they are version 2, but I am not certain.

I

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The steering damper is so very easy to check. Be certain it is turned all the way counterclockwise. (Note where it is currently set.)

IIRC, your forks only have compression damping.  Easy enough to turn the adjusters in and count "clicks", then all the way back out to record where it is set now. Simply return it to the current setting before deciding to change it later.

Changing the preload on the rear shock is more involved as the tank and airbox may have to be removed for access to the lock rings.

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14 hours ago, p6x said:

Today I rode 160 miles non stop. Nothing fancy, just trying to get a feel for the handling, and the best way to sit on the bike.

I was on the I-10 towards San Antonio.

When negotiating curves the handling is more responsive if my back is against the cowl. It also helps to lean inside the fairing to cut the wind. Now it has one major draw back. I am six feet tall, and my legs are locked underneath my body when I crouch, so if I want to do a quick change of trajectory, it is difficult to lean out of the bike.

If I seat directly behind the tank, it is easier to lean out to negotiate the curves and to sweep left and right. My legs are not locked, but the bike is less maneuverable that way.

I have not yet tried tighter curves. The Le Mans is very stable at speed while curving, but it is not really agile or easy to get out of the initial angle. I went briefly up to 6000 rpm, and did some quick changes to check. It is like a rail, but you can't really move it from its chosen glide slope.

Is this more or less the consensus here?

that's how I would describe my observation. +1 on doccs tire pressure comment tho I run my rear at 38. When the front starts to show wear the bike seems heavier in turns so I tend to swap them early.

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21 minutes ago, docc said:

The steering damper is so very easy to check. Be certain it is turned all the way counterclockwise. (Note where it is currently set.)

IIRC, your forks only have compression damping.  Easy enough to turn the adjusters in and count "clicks", then all the way back out to record where it is set now. Simply return it to the current setting before deciding to change it later.

Changing the preload on the rear shock is more involved as the tank and airbox may have to be removed for access to the lock rings.

Wilbers shock remote pre load adjuster. How you can sell a bike with genuine pillion capacity without a simple method of rear preload adjustment is beyond me.

iphonepics 036.jpg

Ciao

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My '02 LM feels "lighter" and more flickable when I put my chest on the tank pad and hugged up against it while weighting the pegs, my butt is barely touching the seat. I'm guessing 60% on tank and 40% on pegs. Almost no weight on clipons. A dramatic handling dynamic difference vs riding lazy (weight on seat and clipons). Could it be why MG put a pad on top of tank? Idk, but when I wanna play in the twisties it works for me. YMMV

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7 hours ago, p6x said:

Today I rode 160 miles non stop. Nothing fancy, just trying to get a feel for the handling, and the best way to sit on the bike.

I was on the I-10 towards San Antonio.

When negotiating curves the handling is more responsive if my back is against the cowl. It also helps to lean inside the fairing to cut the wind. Now it has one major draw back. I am six feet tall, and my legs are locked underneath my body when I crouch, so if I want to do a quick change of trajectory, it is difficult to lean out of the bike.

If I seat directly behind the tank, it is easier to lean out to negotiate the curves and to sweep left and right. My legs are not locked, but the bike is less maneuverable that way.

I have not yet tried tighter curves. The Le Mans is very stable at speed while curving, but it is not really agile or easy to get out of the initial angle. I went briefly up to 6000 rpm, and did some quick changes to check. It is like a rail, but you can't really move it from its chosen glide slope.

Is this more or less the consensus here?

Brake before the corner, then corner on the power and notice the difference. Shafties like to be cornered on the gas.

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As far forward as you can get. Grasp the tank with your knees. No weight on the bars, elbows bent. Late turn in, flick into the corner and add power all the way through the corner. The machine wants to be stable. The less you mess with it other than adding power through the corner, the better it likes it. :grin:

It is a very good handling motorcycle..

Edit: Oh, forgot. 5000 to 6000 rpm is the sweet spot..

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12 hours ago, docc said:

The steering damper is so very easy to check. Be certain it is turned all the way counterclockwise. (Note where it is currently set.)

IIRC, your forks only have compression damping.  Easy enough to turn the adjusters in and count "clicks", then all the way back out to record where it is set now. Simply return it to the current setting before deciding to change it later.

Changing the preload on the rear shock is more involved as the tank and airbox may have to be removed for access to the lock rings.

I need access to a racing track, to adjust and test... the highways here are not ideal for that. I know where to find a set of twisties.

I favor a set up that will have to be a compromise between stable in long fast curves, and agile in the tight ones. I never had a motorbike that heavy before. 

 

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12 hours ago, footgoose said:

that's how I would describe my observation. +1 on doccs tire pressure comment tho I run my front at 38. When the front starts to show wear the bike seems heavier in turns so I tend to swap them early.

I have not yet experimented with tire pressure. Not until I settle on a tire brand and type. But this morning, I will check 38 on the front to see if it improves putting on the angle.

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