Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/28/2021 in all areas

  1. This Sport officially made 200.000 km today. In fine form. I pulled over to record the moment. The most poignant feature in the image? The road ahead!
    12 points
  2. Leading indicators that you are about to have some great tacos: You just had a brisk 100-mile ride. There are more Spanish than English words on the signs. The picture on the sign is of a pile of raw meat. Carniceria is one of the words. Panaderia is one of the words. You have to walk under an arch to get in. Wrought-iron is featured (in this case a wrought-iron arch, so bonus points). The wood chairs are all painted different colors. An old man wearing farm-work clothes and a straw hat is by himself, reading the newspaper on the patio. There is a dirty, beat-to-hell old Ford truck in the parking lot (this was true when I parked, but sadly replaced by a Hummer by the time I sat down with my tacos.) There are more than three flavors of Jarritos in the fridge. And proof: Two el pastor, one carne asada. Two fresh corn tortillas per taco. With onion, cilantro, pico de gallo, guacamole, hot sauce and lime. The real deal.
    11 points
  3. A Guzzi (and non Guzzi) ride out last Sunday. My silver V11 next to the Cali. The days are getting shorter, and fall is starting
    8 points
  4. Here is an excellent image of the 2002/early-2003 "carry-over" LongFrame with short tank compared to an early ShortFrame/short tank Sport. Notice the amount of exposed frame between the front of the tanks and the forks. That is where the V11 frame was lengthened. A trim piece ("panel" 01 57 59 60 ) covers the otherwise exposed wiring/etc crossing the space. Later "long tanks" (internal pump/filter and no chin pad) obscure this area. Image (and Sports!) courtesy of @Guzzimax
    7 points
  5. Hibernation is approaching for me as well. Once November arrives and the gritters start salting the roads, that’s it for me until March, unless we have a mild spell when the roads are free of salt. Oh to live in a warmer climate…….I was originally intending to go out for a ride today, but it rained most of the day, & apart from moving a bike in and out of the garage, I didn’t venture anywhere
    7 points
  6. Last ride before hibernation today, l think. Nice weather with 6c. Home 6.30,, 2c = V cold knees. Cheers Tom Sent fra min SM-A525F via Tapatalk
    7 points
  7. Make no mistake, the "RedFrame" V11 Sport was/is a real "sporting" Guzzi. So-much-so, that Moto Guzzi very quickly lengthened and braced the frame, offered a fairing, with a wider rear rim/bigger tire, changed the forks, and offered "handlebars" (over the clip-ons). We > RedFrameTrash < are just lucky to land here and soak up the love.
    7 points
  8. Reasonably nice V7 cafe custom, being prepped for a new owner and some track time.
    6 points
  9. Consider it done! Glorious 133 mile day on hilly backroads, almost no traffic (I did pass that one Porsche. Because I could.) Perfectly clear, dry 60ºF/ 16ºC. Not the greatest view, but gives an idea of the roads here. This is the point that mySport posted an honest 200,000 kilometers. And ran sooooo great all day!
    6 points
  10. Even with knowing about the extra 274 miles to make a true and proper 200.000 km, it was cool to see this on the odometer today.
    6 points
  11. John asked me to look in on this thread, I used to know quite a bit about these systems. Firstly the alternator wires can be a problem, they snap off where they solder to the coils. When this happened to mine the copper was so corroded it was not possible to re-solder them so time for some new wires, its quite easy to solder the new copper to the coils. The bullet connectors where the regulator plugs into the stator leads often overheat, if this is a problem just chop the bullet connectors off and join to the alternator with crimp links or a solder joint. Grounding the regulator is critical, all the charging current travels back from the chassis to the regulator case so it can return to the alternator through the other yellow wire. The factory supply a small black wire from the case all the way to battery negative but this is far too small for the current involved. Run a short wire from the regulator case to a timing cover screw, the engine and battery main ground are massive compared to the tiny black wire. The regulator has a rectifier set up as a bridge, 2 diodes and 2 Silicon Controlled Rectifiers. The rectifiers sometimes go open circuit, this situation is very easy to set for if you have a meter with the diode test function, The diodes are connected from each yellow wire to the red wire, it should show about 0.5 Volt, since the diodes are between each yellow wire and the red pair its possible to add a diode on the outside. The way they measure the battery Voltage is very poor, it taps off the feed to the headlight after the headlight relay and in some cases a normally closed contact of the start relay. The relay contact and socket resistance changes with time, the Voltage drop can be anything from 0.6 to 1 Volt, I have a theory that the reference voltage drop approaches 1 Voltmeaning the battery Voltage has to be pushed above 15 to supply the regulator reference, this high Voltage demands more current which overheats the diodes unit the leads melt off. A warning sign can be the headlight out or the tachometer not working, chances are the battery is not charging and of course the charge light also fed from the headlight relay won't be working either fooling you into thinking everything is ok. I often thought of getting the Voltage reference from a different source downstream of the ignition switch, off one of the ECU relays or from a dedicated relay direct from the battery. This would give the regulator a lower Voltage reference because it expects a drop through the relay but it could easily be compensated for with some resistance ora diode in series. I struggled with this flakey Voltage reference for years then I upgraded to a permanently connected regulator from Electrosport, there was one minor drawback a parasitic drain on the battery, I used to disconnect the regulator over the winter but if you don't remember to re-connect it next thing you know the bike dies with a flat battery. Electrosport recommend their ESR515, I dont agree, it still relies on the flakey Voltage reference and a good ground connection. I used the ESR510 it is wired direct to the battery and it has a dedicated ground wire I don't think it supports the charge light. Instead of a charge light I recommend just purchase a battery Voltmeter for ~ $15 and hook it downstream of the ignition switch this will leave you in no doubt. https://www.amazon.com/12V-Voltmeter-Color-Digital-Display/dp/B07HHTZ1L5/ref=sr_1_46?dchild=1&keywords=12+volt+battery+meter&qid=1633586264&sr=8-46
    6 points
  12. ^ side stand switch is easily by-passable if you are in need. Same with the clutch-in-to-start switch. I carry a side-stand bypass plug (homemade) in my underseat kit. Hacked the connector off an old wiring harness and closed the loop. Honestly, to start this bike... ignition switch, kill switch, clutch switch, side-stand switch, neutral switch, starter button, relay, starter solenoid, battery amperage, starter motor... what could possibly go wrong?
    6 points
  13. Deltic 2 stroke, Allen Millyard is probably installing one in a frame as I write
    6 points
  14. Talk about rare. I'm the current "keeper" of the most rare V11S model of all, the Scura RC. (rubber chicken)
    5 points
  15. Frankly, this is a very familiar and fantastically sexy formula . . . Missing = 1) Exclusivity , and 2) Tanya Dexters (Instead, a concrete pillar)
    5 points
  16. There really isn't a compelling technical reason to install the gears with the exception that you do away with a cam chain tensioner and the inertia of a double row chain flailing about. If you need to renew the cam drive system and tensioner because of wear and add up the cost of the new Guzzi components then the upgrade to gears isn't to expensive at all. Docc did the numbers on it a little while ago. Ciao
    5 points
  17. Polished and polished (and polished) my new internal pump tank.... This is actually the original colour my bike had before all the paint fell off! What a steal for £180 with the pump!! Most of the little mark polished out with consecutive paint restorer/polish application. I am rather sweaty now though 🤣
    5 points
  18. The bump stop. It's what prevents damage to the shock internals when it bottoms out. You need to remove the spring and the eye end to replace it and removing the eye end is no joke even for a "shock expert". It involves heating the eye end to get it hot enough to to release the thread locker then a shaft holding tool, sometimes even in a shop press to hold the shock shaft to undo the eye end. I would cut a shallow groove around the perimeter of a new bumper that will accommodate an electrical tie wrap then cut it so you can spread it and slip it over the shaft and use the tie wrap to clamp it in place again. Ciao
    5 points
  19. Here is a photo-show ride report of a(nother) run from the top of Virginia to Owensboro, in western Kentucky and back for — yes, really — mutton. Oh, and for bourbon, beer, and more. Why? Just because, of course. On Tuesday, 21 September, Larry flew in from Ormond Beach, Florida, and Bob rode his V7 III from Rochester, New York. Lannis (Appomattox, Va.) and Dennis (Atlanta, Ga.) joined us along the way. Then, Sarah, Doug, & Tina — Kentuckians from Glasgow and the first two on Guzzis — met us at St. Mary’s picnic in Whitesville. Two others had to bow out, but are likely attendees for the next Mutton Run. So … as Wednesday was an all-day drencher, we launched on Thursday morning. Kathi spent most of the "Guys Gone" time in Erie with her dad. The photos pretty much tell the story. And, yes, of course, as usual, “too many pix;” you don't have to open it. But I did cull the original bazillion pix — seriously, 500+ something! — into a much smaller slideshow. Link below. The run from here to Owensboro and back was about 1300 miles, plus another 200+ or so of local riding. I also added some with my backtracking to Lexington for that new tire. Bob, with his r/t from New York did 2200 miles! As with most of my photo stories, this opens in “landscape collage,” so one sees all at once. You can see captions when hovering cursor over pix. Can also just go to larger pix by using the slideshow option. Here’s that link: Muttoneering in Kentucky I’m still grinning about these past several days of riding for mutton and more with some grand friends, the Muttoneers! What a wonderful memory Bill
    5 points
  20. My Scura R actually came from the Isle of Man 🇮🇲 - they were the last of the V11’s as production ended & were only allocated to European countries. I once found the breakdown per country & as I recall there were 4 only allocated to the UK. A few year’s back a forum member pm’d asking to buy mine - but I be like Charlton Heston! 🔫 ✋
    4 points
  21. My "good" tools are Snap On and Matco. I've never used them, but think Mac is ok. The tools listed by "the least mechanical person on the board." are designed to pass warranty. That is all I'll say about that. If you can find some antique (say 50s) Craftsman.. they are fine. Strong and delicate.
    4 points
  22. Stop #8 to #14 of 50: The Frio Canyon run; étapes 10, 13, 14, 21, 23, 40, 50. Summary: 717 miles (1154 km) run. Starting on Friday 15th, 7:30, back on Saturday 16th, 16:00. Highlights: Getting acquainted with what the Moto Guzzi can do Understanding the limits (mainly mine) Riding in different weather conditions The pro's and con's of minimalism packing Meeting people Lowlights: Not enough time to really enjoy the tour stops The Frio Canyon better known as the "Three Twisted Sisters": These so-called sisters are Ranch Road 335, 336, 337. While my objective was to add some stops to the Motorcycle Grand Tour of Texas, checking the sisters was also on my list. I only got to ride on one, 337. But the experience was incredible. More on that later. I set out early on Friday. I had planned that trip to begin on Thursday, but we had a full day of storm in H'town, and I did not want to ride under adverse conditions. I made my first stop at Gonzales Texas; Tour Stop #50 I then proceeded to my second stop, Frio Canyon Motorcycle Stop at Leakey, Tx. Approaching Concan Tx, I got surprised by an unexpected torrential rains thunderstorm. I was on 83, in the open, and I could do nothing but keep riding. Fortunately, I was behind a truck, and I only had to follow its lights from a safe distance. The rain was so strong that I had zero visibility, and I got soaked wet in no time. In Concan, I stopped at a gas station to let the rain pass. I was literally dripping water. All my clothing was water logged. The Guzzi did not mind at all the ride in the storm. I finally made it to my destination, the Frio Canyon Motorcycle Stop on Ranch Road 337. Tour Stop #23 During summer days, this spot is extremely popular. However, I found the place completely deserted, if excepted for some locals. The Bent Rim Grill has tables outside and a very peaceful view. The River Hills cabin where just right above the Motorcycle stop. As you saw on the time lapse, there was a lot of wind that Saturday morning, and the temperature had dropped from close to 80F (27+) to 50F (10+). The cold air was unpleasant filtering through the forearm aeration of my Marsee jacket. But riding at sunrise was so beautiful that it did not matter long. The 337 was very narrow, and there aren't any way to stop to take pictures. There were also plenty of bicycle riders, and you need to factor that in. Then I went on to make the required stops on my way back home: Tour Stop #10 YO Ranch Hotel Kerrville Tour Stop #40 Kerrville National Cemetery Tour Stop #13 Javelina Harley Davidson Boerne; Tour Stop #14 Alamo BMW Boerne Tour Stop #21 Gruene Harley Davidson Gruene Conclusion and lesson learned: There was a lot of wind for the ride back home. It became very painful for the neck. Possibly because I lack the muscle mass. I could alleviate the problem by riding leaning on the tank, with the helmet right behind the fairing. My rear end was sore, but the worse problem I had was the thighs for some strange reason. I do not know why. Harley Davidson Javelina and Gruene were full of people gathering for a Saturday. This was quite incredible!!! Food truck, Music... In comparison, the BMW dealer was completely deserted. I am going back to Leakey, this is certain. And this time, I will stay long enough to ride the three twisted sisters multiple times, each direction.
    4 points
  23. 4 points
  24. Electric(al) on cars makes sense to me. Like this insane yellow (Accel?) coil that @Tomchri shared with us last year. Pretty sure "dual quad Holleys on a tunnel ram" offer up emotion enough! Maybe some "Hooker Headers" to stir the mix . . .
    4 points
  25. Lovely. You know docc for me the sound and "feel" of a vehicle are massively important and why if I'm forced into a situation where every vehicle I own has to be an EV I'll just find another hobby/interest. Don't mind an EV Daily Driver in the slightest as a conveyance to get me from A to B but I could never become an EV "enthusiast". Too much character missing. As an aside my car has FENG ( fake engine noise generator) which is fake exhaust sound through the audio system, totally pathetic and it doesn't really need it anyway. That's maybe the EV future, a fake " emotional" system. You'll be taking your car to the mechanic because it "doesn't feel good" and he'll reboot the "emotion" generator. God help us all. Ciao
    4 points
  26. Seems that a V10 RedFrame should have a 9" rear. Oh, wait, that is something entirely different . . .
    4 points
  27. Haha... I remember that exchange well, Phil. I think we both learned something new. We clarified that there were 3 configurations from the factory. Short frame with short tank (pad and external pump) - up to 2001 model year, will not accommodate later tank. Long frame with short tank (all 2002s and many 2003s) - will accommodate later tank. Long frame with long tank. (2003 LeMans, and all 2004 and later.
    4 points
  28. If I go to sleep with a V11 wiring harness under my pillow, or whatever electrical part imparts the most wisdom, will I wake up as all-knowing as you guys in the morning? Is that what you do? No. I don't think so. I will have awful creases in my cheek and sheets stained from the charcoal-black, burned wires.
    4 points
  29. Perhaps this will work if you can put up with my waffling for twenty minutes? https://youtu.be/BDshMp-bM_0
    4 points
  30. Wow, Kiwi_Roy, exhaustive. I replaced the regulator after navigating through the V11lemans Tutorial Committee's advice and my bike is on the road and only needed human power for propulsion once since, a few days ago, when I ran it out of fuel. It has trained me well in the art pushing it around. I'm beginning to believe it learned a few tricks in an S & M dungeon and I'm its rube. I discovered a fried black wire in the harness under the seat a while back and appealed to the collective wisdom implicit here and ran a more robust wire from the regulator to ground. The electrical system seemed good enough to earn a grade of D, graded on a curve, in a class filled with Moto Guzzi addicts; until the regulator quit, was replaced and here I am still crying into my beer to anyone who'll listen. But it runs, only if I give it a drink of gasoline, but it is running. Almost overwhelming, the well written detail in your post. I do have a battery drain, it would be nice if I could vanquish it. I will cajole a friend who's education exceeds my kindergarten diploma in electrical/electronic summer camp to read over my shoulder and parse what you're recommending. He'll sketch a few illustrations in cartoon form and I'll get it. Thank you.
    4 points
  31. Epic thread drift. I promise to report myself to myself. No, really, the front UNI is >approachable< on an early RedFrame. It is. It is.
    4 points
  32. "I'm not afraid . . ." (Mess with you, Yoda does.)
    4 points
  33. 4 points
  34. @dowieze, here is the location of the critical main ground from the battery negative/earth terminal to the back of the gearbox on the right, behind the seat latch: If the starter cannot ground back to this point, it will destroy the wiring harness trying to start . . . Also, let us all be aware that the starter motor, itself, grounds through its mounting bolts. It is very important that these bolts, their washers, threads, and surfaces between the starter motor and mounting surface are clean, connected, and sealed from corrosion.
    4 points
  35. As mentioned already, it's funny the strange places they turn up. Although I was a bike fanatic when I was younger, haunted all the bike shops and lusted after the CX100 in the magazines back in the day, I had never actually seen a Moto Guzzi in person through my lifetime. About 12 years ago at work, I'm in the back parking lot on a smoke break, and one of the guys that worked in the traffic office, rides in on a Rosso Mandello; he'd apparently just picked it up from the Chicago ? area in the US on a bus? and ride deal. I was awestruck, be still my beating heart. When the first guzzi you see and touch is a RM, that sets the stage, and is the fodder for a serious addiction, lol
    3 points
  36. Actually Pete there is one semi significant difference. Some have an 8mm side stand bracket threaded mount bolt hole and some have a 6mm bolt which can be a bit of a pain if you have the wrong one as I did when I did the V10 Sport. Didn't realise until I went to refit the side stand bracket. It's not straight forward opening up the 6mm side stand bracket hole to accommodate the 8mm cap screw head. Not without a mill anyway. Ciao
    3 points
  37. I read in the book " Not much of an engineer" By Stanley Hooker a massive name in RR the classic line from Hives who ran RR during the war when he first had a meeting with Frank Whittle to discuss RR building Whittles jet engine. Whittle said to him that his jet engine was a "simple Engine" to which Hives replied, "Don't worry we'll engineer the simplicity out of it" lol. Classic and true to this day. I've worked on American, European/American and English RR turbo props and high bypass jets and RR always seem to do it the complex way. Ciao
    3 points
  38. Pretty sure we all feel for ya, buddy. Personally, I surely don't have the patience or restraint to do what you have done and sit it out until spring to be riding a sweet RedFrame V11 Sport. Cold front passing tonight here. Tomorrow will be the most joyous, Mandello-like weather mySport will have breathed since the spring. She absolutely loves it! I can hardly wait for even just tomorrow! Cannot imagine waiting 'til spring . . .
    3 points
  39. Classy? Yes!! Tuxedo? I was thinking more black party dress with red pumps . . .
    3 points
  40. This gorgeous champagne LeMans looks entirely capable of making the next (Eighteenth!) South'n SpineRaid in Tellico Plains, Tennessee, from "Southwest Ohio", @witttom . . . (Weekend After Labor Day/Get There/Bring Tools.)
    3 points
  41. I think both of you have missed the point with regards to relay temps. Guzzi have designed them as a "seat warmer". A free option not previously advertised but revealed here after 20 years. Ciao
    3 points
  42. Let me start in saying I lurked this forum for months before deciding that I needed a V11 in my life. I will admit to being reluctant to take on a more niche motorcycle, even compared to the Ducatis I'm used to. I thought if I bought a Moto Guzzi, it would be endless frustration, waiting five-ever to just LOCATE parts...not to think about shipping from the EU for everything, save oil filters. I thought it would be hell, like owning an MV Agusta. I am here to say, my fears were nearly entirety unfounded. Namely, MG Cycle, AF1 Racing, and eBay have helped me find every washer, seal, gasket, bolt, so far, that I have needed. Please, spend your money with MG specialists, so they can keep working with us to keep going. They deserve our support and encouragement. I think most of this fortune stems from a very small and cultist group of riders and suppliers who keep these elegant machines humming. Admittedly, some parts are a little spendy...but, I'm pleasantly surprised I'm able to locate what I need with little drama and a pinch of patience. A lot of parts are downright cheap! So, to anyone on the fence about getting a V11, I'd say go for it! Just do yourself a big favor and only buy the nicest example that you can afford. Don't buy a project bike unless you have very deep pockets and endless patience waiting for parts. A huge thank you especially to @Docc, for giving me buying advice and not letting me talk myself out of one of the best experiences in all motorcycling! I really look forward to next year when I can put my V11 Sport through her paces!
    3 points
  43. So I was on Griso Ghetto and a person posted aboutSouth’n Spine Raid at the Lodge at Tellico in Tellico Plains, Tennessee. I I was just through that area with my Griso. I went up Buck Bald Mountain chassing a KTM 890 R. I may want to join you guys next year as I really like that area. I own a 2007 Norge like the gentlman who posted the article, but I think I would rather ride the Griso. I was there for the Georgia rally. I wanted to do the Kentucky Rally like the gentelman who posted the article but it was my mothers birthday and we had a party for her. Here is a pic on top of Buck Bald. I have a GoPro Video of the ride up but too large to share here.
    3 points
  44. I have to thank the SpineRaider with the Rosso Mandello. What an awesome cat. He so promoted the TechSession, and took it all in. So glad to meet up with him again and admire his Rosso Mandello! After traversing the Cherohala, he said something so very encouraging to me. I've long thought my AeroStich aboard the V11 looks akin to a "high and heavy canvas covered load" (Johnny Cash). Adam said I look like a "Diesel Bulldog." Thanks for the encouragement, bud!
    3 points
×
×
  • Create New...